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Sgathak
2005-01-27, 22:02
What do you carry one the trail?

I tend to eat very "asian"... its quick and easy to prepare and can be very healthy if prepared right.

Soooo...

I carry Ramen noodles, Thai Rice noodles, fresh fruits and veggies, lightly dried (so it can rehydrate, unlike jerky) deer or elk, and whole nuts. I also carry a few small squeeze bottles of soy sauce, thai chili sauce, and olive oil. Plus plenty of miso soup powder and dried tofu.

For snacks, I have some moose goo, maranantha organic peanut butter (in a squeeze tube, softer than regular peanut butter, less salt than other peanut butters) or some nutella.

And for giggles, Ill throw in some hammer gel or honey based gels.

I can rehydrate all the dried stuff in a nalgene bottle and then when its time to eat - start the stove, toss some olive oil into the pot, and use the stoves warm up stage to get the oil hot. Then you just drain off the water in the nalgene and add in the noodles, veggies and meat/tofu.

Dinners ready in 5 minutes.

deadeye
2005-01-28, 10:06
Ditto on most of the above, particularly the asian food. Another staple is mashed potato flakes, to which can be added all sorts of stuff like chicken broth, canned or dried tuna or chicken, soy bacon bits, TVP, dried milk and spices, dried veggies, etc. Can make a high-protein, high-carb, easy cooking, good tasting one-pot meal. Add olive oil or squeeze Parkey for fat & extra calories. Great stuff when packing for long intervals between resupplies. If I'm out for shorter trips, or shorter distances between resupplies, an MRE or two is a great treat. Some are worse than dog food (the bean burrito comes to mind), but some are excellent. I think the minestrone is my favorite.

JPW
2005-02-04, 15:52
I like the alfredio nodle and sause mix. If you hapen upon a pond with bluegill you can catch, add the meat from one or two filleted and cut into pieces, or cheat and add a pack or can of whatever you want.I cant remember the brand name of the last one I fixed. I'am trying to come up with things I can get at any small country store. I used to be the guy carring the dutch oven, switching to ultra lite is changing my cooking.

Major Slacker
2005-03-04, 19:19
I'm always trying something new -- preferably from the grocery store. I limit my cooking to just boiling water and my menu to what I can cook in a bag.

Just the other day I found a little single serving carton of no-bean chili. (Living in Texas I discovered true chili satisfaction, and it's been nothing but meat and heat for me ever since.) At 14 oz. it was heavy, but I usually pack one heavy meal for the first night out. I packed 3-4 tortillas in a zip-lock, put that and the unopened chili carton in a Food Saver bag, poured in 2 cups of boiling water, waited 5 minutes, poured off the water and feasted fajita-style. Mmmmm! I'm thinking I might be having that for dinner tonight.

For dinner I mostly eat soup, mixing and matching from the following: whole wheat couscous, "instant" brown or white rice, Knorr vegetable or spring vegetable soup mixes, ramen noodles from the health food store or aisle if possible, Lipton chicken noodle soup with the freeze-dried chicken chunks, freeze-dried vegetables. For first nights out I like those new little foil pouches: an asian soup mix with shrimp or imitation crab, potato soup mix with clams, jambalaya with shrimp. I also like Tasty Bite Indian meals in foil packets that can be heated in the pot as the water heats. They also come with a great little plastic tray, lid and spoon. Sometimes I'll eat a freeze-dried dinner, because when I go browsing in the local outdoor outfitter's store I buy at least one thing, even if it's just a freeze-dried dinner. I usually sip a cup of decaf tea while the food cooks.

For breakfast I like oatmeal with brown sugar, nuts and/or fruit. Granola is good hot or cold, so I pack it if I can't decide ahead of time if I want to cook breakfast. Cereal bars and granola bars are great if I don't want to cook at all. My favorite, really, is a Hostess apple pie, but I can't usually find those. They're also too heavy to carry more than one. At home I gotta have my French roast brewed VERY strong and mixed with sweetened condensed milk. On the trail I settle for the generic equivalent of the International Foods Cafe Vienna mix using 3 scoops instead of 2. I also like an orange flavored "energy" drink mix called Emergen-C.

For lunch I nibble all day on all kinds of stuff: dried fruit, fig newtons, nuts, fig newtons, beef jerky, fig newtons, Snyder's pretzel pieces mixed half jalapeno and half cheddar cheese, fig newtons, various snack bars and fig newtons. Did I mention fig newtons? I used to count out 2 per day, then 3 per day, then 4 per day. Now I don't count them, because I eat them all the first day anyway.

GregH
2005-03-20, 22:41
...For lunch I nibble all day on all kinds of stuff: dried fruit, fig newtons, nuts, fig newtons, beef jerky, fig newtons, Snyder's pretzel pieces mixed half jalapeno and half cheddar cheese, fig newtons, various snack bars and fig newtons. Did I mention fig newtons? I used to count out 2 per day, then 3 per day, then 4 per day. Now I don't count them, because I eat them all the first day anyway.

So how many pounds of Fig Newton's per day does one need when hiking?

jimtanker
2005-03-21, 00:01
Oatmeal and coaco for breakfast. Yea gets borring but I buy the variety pack.

My GORP of choice is cashews and M&Ms. Some home made jerky for snacks too.

Dinner is Ramen flavored with crushed red pepper/jerkey/chicken packet in any combonation. Easy mac, microwavable mac n cheese is great.
Everything I cook is just with water added, no cleanup.

Watered down gatoraid to drink and a packet of Gu thrown in when I'm feeling that dragging feeling.

Major Slacker
2005-03-21, 14:18
So how many pounds of Fig Newton's per day does one need when hiking?
Hmmm. Let's see,

(F x H) / D where F = pounds of Fig Newtons, H = hikers and D = days.

Limit of F = C - B where C is carrying capacity of H, and B is base weight of H's pack.

Limit of D = R where R is days until resupply.

If H eats all the Fig Newtons on the first day, F/D approaches zero as limit of D approaches infinity. Conversely, F/D approaches the limit of F as D approaches 1.

There you go. ;)

GregH
2005-03-21, 17:17
Thanks for the thorough report. I want to be fully prepared on my next trip out!
(Now I just need to find a grocer who sells Fig Newtons by the truckload.)

Frolicking Dino
2006-06-05, 19:19
I'm not real fond of regular ramen, but there are some tasty quick-cooking noodle combos at the Asian supermarkets. Thai pad noodles come with three flavor packets - the tiniest one should be labeled 'molten lava'. They also sell various sorts of dried fish and packets of flavorings that make some wonderful meals.


If H eats all the Fig Newtons on the first day, F/D approaches zero as limit of D approaches infinity.If H eats all the Fig Newton's, then D become diarrhea instead of days in this equation. My son ate a two-pound box of Fig Newtons once....

Take-a-knee
2006-06-05, 22:39
What to eat on the trail is a work in progress for me. I've had access to MRE's for years so I just ate those. I recently discovered Knorr/Lipton rice and pasta side dishes at the local supermarket. Just add boiling water and simmer for 7min. I've been using my OES simmer stove but I think a cozy would do but I have yet to make one. I usually add a foil packet of tuna or chicken for protein, those dehydrated meals are tasty but skimpy on the protein. I decided to try the Knorr brand because they have no hydrogenated fats, if you haven't gotten the word that stuff will clog an artery post haste. Deadeye, for that reason lay off the squeeze parkay, the olive oil is much healthier. Lard is a health food compared to anything that is partially hydrogenated. I like the mountain house granola for breakfast (500 calories!) or oatmeal. Cliff builder bars (20 grams protein) or a MetRx bar a few hours later. Homemade trail mix as needed.

KLeth
2006-06-06, 01:41
We've just begun packing and measuring up food for this years summer trip.
For lunch and dinner we will primarily be eating freeze-dried rations (Globetrotter, Trekking Mahlzeiten, Blaa Band, Travellunch). These are just dumped in boiling water or prepared in the bag by dumping hot water in it. For after-dinner we have powdered blueberry soup, powdered chocolate pudding, hot chocolate or powdered vanilla pudding. These desserts can normally be bought in ordinary stores.
Last year we also brought Cathay Pemmikan, which we ate with mashed potatoes (from powder) - Very good. Last year we also used rice bags that only should cook for 10min (found some 5min later), these can easily be boiled in a makeshift cozy.
For breakfast we use a & mix of oatmeal and a milk-pouridge (high in protein and long-carbs) maybe mixed with some freshly picked blueberries, fresh cooked blueberry jam, raisins or brown sugar.
For snacks we bring logan-bread, jerky and nut-mix.
We alays remember to add just a little salt to our food to prevent de-salting which is not the funniest thing I've tried on the trail.

Our summer hikes are normally without re-supply, so we're carrying quite a lot of food.

dropkick
2006-06-08, 02:05
I like to make my own mixes that only require boiling water to complete. (I actually call them messes instead of mixes as I often cook them together in one pot)

examples:

Spaghetti: dried tomato paste, homemade dried noodles (they cook faster), dried hamburger, dried onion, dried celery, dried carrot, dried celery (my normal veg packet mix), dried mushroom, and marjoram, add boiling water, let sit in cozy till cooked, eat.

S.O.P.: (like s.o.s. with potatoes) potato buds, dried milk, black pepper, put in pot add boiling water, stir. Dried hamburger, beef gravy mix, dried onion, dried mushroom, dried milk, put on top of potatoes, add more boiling water, stir top, let sit in cozy till done.

Turkey dinner: potato buds, dried milk, black pepper, put in pot add boiling water, stir.
Stove top stuffing, put on top of potatoes. Can/package of turkey or chicken, turkey gravy mix, dried milk, put on top of stuffing, add boiling water, stir gravy/turkey layer, let sit in cozy till done.

Beef stew: veg mix, beef, gravy mix, dried milk

etc.

Seeker
2006-06-08, 14:32
i'm not much of a fussy eater... you military guys might (or might not) understand... but i loved the ham and eggs c-ration, and the omelet with with ham MRE.... ate them every meal i could get... alternated once in a great while with beef stew... didn't like much else, and in 11 years and two deployments, only added tabasco to a meal once... didn't see the sense, so i never did it again... so my camping diet tends toward the simple/monotonous...

that said, i love lipton/knorr noodles (stroganoff or chicken) with foil pack chicken. i split a package into two ziplock bags, add a huge tablespoon of powdered milk, and i'm good. sometimes i'll add chopped up beef jerky instead. that makes it a one-bag meal. but it's not hard to add the foil-pack chicken either.

for breakfast i like oatmeal... same drill as lipton noodles... baggie with two oatmeal packs and a huge tablespoon of powdered milk in it.

lunches are a bit more varied... essentially starches and meat/cheese... that means crackers or bagels or english muffins, summer sausage/ landjaeger/ pepperoni, and chunks of cheddar or pre-packaged cheese sticks like my kids take for lunch. i often make a cup of soup for lunch too.

Number7
2006-07-03, 04:10
Enertia trail foods are the bomb.

blackbishop351
2006-07-03, 08:43
Hmmm. Let's see,

(F x H) / D where F = pounds of Fig Newtons, H = hikers and D = days.

Limit of F = C - B where C is carrying capacity of H, and B is base weight of H's pack.

Limit of D = R where R is days until resupply.

If H eats all the Fig Newtons on the first day, F/D approaches zero as limit of D approaches infinity. Conversely, F/D approaches the limit of F as D approaches 1.

There you go. ;)

OMG!!! I'm dyin' here! Finally another math-oriented hiker!! (I'm a physics/pure math major)

KLeth
2006-08-06, 04:08
Made 6 packs of hamburger rocks/gravel for our summer hike.
1.5kg of cheap ground beef 10-12% fat became app. 450g gravel split in 6 ziplocks. Each pack got a large pinch of salt before being sealed, to ensure deactivation of any residue water. The salt were also great to get extra natrium on the trail. What ever we wanted to use the gravel in got an extra 150ml water and we let the gravel heat with the water. This meant that the gravel were rehydrated when food was ready.

dropkick
2006-08-06, 07:38
I like to make my cooking burger into jerky.
I mix the burger with salt and pepper. (Occasionally I also add minced onion, or garlic).
Roll it out on parchment paper in a sheet pan about 1/4 inch thick.(6 mm)
Cook it in a closed oven for 1 hour at 200F/94C. -This should kill any germs, etc.
Then I get rid of the sheet pan, peel off the paper, and with scissors cut it into 1 inch strips (2.5 cm).
I put it back in the oven, directly on the racks, and at the lowest temperature (170F/75C) I dry it with the oven door cracked open for 3 or 4 more hours.
If it cracks when bent it's done.
I cool it uncovered in the refrigerator, and then package it in plastic bags.
I keep it in a freezer until time too use it, but it's good for months without freezing.

When I want to use it, I either rip it up and rehydrate it, or eat it like jerky.

-Rule of thumb: when adding to a recipe it takes an equal amount of liquid to rehydrate the jerky.
i.e. add 1/4 C boiling water for every 1/4 C of jerky (normal portion for 1 person)

JAK
2006-08-06, 10:22
Made 6 packs of hamburger rocks/gravel for our summer hike.
1.5kg of cheap ground beef 10-12% fat became app. 450g gravel split in 6 ziplocks. Each pack got a large pinch of salt before being sealed, to ensure deactivation of any residue water. The salt were also great to get extra natrium on the trail. What ever we wanted to use the gravel in got an extra 150ml water and we let the gravel heat with the water. This meant that the gravel were rehydrated when food was ready.I could see that stuff being really handy if you need a little extra traction. ;

I am going to try that this winter, as food I mean.
I'm curious if you could rehydrate it with snow?

Congrats on your Greenland trek!

KLeth
2006-08-06, 11:15
I'm curious if you could rehydrate it with snow?
Didn't try with snow, it's summer on Greenland and therefore there is surface water-o-plenty :biggrin: I know why it was called Greenland . . .
In total we had around 300 hours of sun and temperatures ranging between -1C & 26C.

JAK
2006-08-07, 01:32
Didn't try with snow, it's summer on Greenland and therefore there is surface water-o-plenty :biggrin: I know why it was called Greenland . . .
In total we had around 300 hours of sun and temperatures ranging between -1C & 26C.Very nice. Sounds like things are greening up. Now don't you guys be getting any ideas about going a Viking again. :viking:
Vinlands taken. :)

We're having a hard enough time holding off the Yanks. :fight:

This has been our best strategy so far ---> :cheers:

Major Slacker
2006-08-07, 09:58
OMG!!! I'm dyin' here! Finally another math-oriented hiker!! (I'm a physics/pure math major)
Hang on, don't be dyin'! I'm really more an art-oriented hiker, but I might be the only art major who took Calculus classes for the fun of it.

JAK
2006-08-07, 15:40
Hang on, don't be dyin'! I'm really more an art-oriented hiker, but I might be the only art major who took Calculus classes for the fun of it.Hmmm. I was an engineering student that took English Literature classes for the fun of it. If I did it again I would have gone for a BA with a Math major first, before studying engineering. There was too much smoke and mirrors when we covered it, and now I am too old for the mental cartwheels. I do find the History of Mathematics interesting. That is still within my reach. And stove design. Stove design is great. If you can't figure it out you can still build it and get the answer that way. :)

KBob
2007-01-31, 11:55
I once opened a C rat and found it was Ham and eggs, yuck, left it on a bunker wall. a rat came up sniffed it and ran away.

shooter
2007-02-05, 12:55
parts of pine trees are eatable.
gators have big mouths.

JAK
2007-02-06, 09:53
I once opened a C rat and found it was Ham and eggs, yuck, left it on a bunker wall. a rat came up sniffed it and ran away.The Ham and Cheese in the Canadian meal packs weren't too bad if you hit them with a lot of ketchup first. Some argued not to heat them first. You were basically OK as long as you found a way to wolf them down without bringing out the flavour. Still, anything with eggs designed for a shelf life of 100 years has to be suspect.

KBob
2007-02-06, 10:05
The ham and egg C ration I am talking about happened about 35 years ago in a little country far far away. Even in the 70s they were old, worst was the pork slices in "axle grease". Junior in "Platoon" says it best.

JAK
2007-02-06, 11:22
Pork Slices in Axle Grease eh. Sounds yummy.

Growing up in Canada in the 60s and 70s I would see the odd Life Magazine expose' or come across a glancing reference in a stack of Boy's Life magazines I got from an older cousin, but I always thought they were references to WWII or the Korean War, which I heard a lot about growing up as they really weren't that long before, looking back. I didn't learn about the Vietnam War until it was ending and my mother had me watch the helicopters leaving the embassy roof and telling me it was one of those important points in history, like the Man on the Moon, and the '72 Canada-Russia Series, different ending of course. But I grew up knowing more about those other things, and even phalidimide since I had a phalidimide girl in my class. So you are like one of those ghosts under my bed that I grew up with but never got a chance to really know.

It rather shocked the crap out of me as I eventually studied it further in school, that it was during my childhood, and that my older cousin might have been over there had he been an American. So I make it a point to make sure my daughter is more aware of what is going on in the world as she grows up in it, without shoving her face into it too much. I will never forget when we hadn't realized she was in the room as we were all in shock and disbelief and her little innocent voice called out "daddy look a plane" as the plane hit the sceond tower. She was just going on two, and had flown on planes and had fallen in love with them as I had worked away a bit and she even flown up front with the pilots on one flight back from Newfoundland and got a set of wings. There won't be two many more kids flying up front anymore. I'll have to tell her the whole story when she is older, but in the mean time she is at least kept somewhat aware that there is a place called Iraq, and another place called Afghanistan, and some other places, where real people are dieing every day. I figure my job isn't to protect her from it, since other people are already doing that and have already done that. My job is to keep her somewhat in touch with it, as much as it is possible to do so, and I am able.

Cheers.

john pickett
2007-02-07, 15:53
"But I grew up knowing more about those other things, and even phalidimide since I had a phalidimide girl in my class."

JAK,
Are you by chance refering to "Thalidomide"?
John Pickett

JAK
2007-02-07, 19:11
That was it. Thalidomide. Thanks. My classmate was only missing a few fingers. My mother was a nurse and even she came very close to using the drug. She made that pretty clear to me that I wasn't to turn my back because that could just as easily have been me. I moved away but it's funny how the bonds grow stronger as you grow older. Talking 'bout my generation.

sailingsoul
2007-02-07, 23:13
Raising children is such an awesome job. I grew up in the 50/60's, I remember the thalidomide tragedy. That drug was prescribed to treat morning sickness in pregnant women. At that time it was not approved for use in the US. The Enquirer had pictures showing some of the thousands of babies in Europe with horrendous birth defects. Missing two fingers, she was lucky from what I've seen. It is very important to be sure your children are socially aware up to a point. I had a good friend who's German Jewish parents never let him forget how lucky he was to be growing up in NYC and not in 30/40's Germany. He confided to me once that he hated his dead relatives whom he sometimes had night mares about. Kind of got in the way of enjoying his childhood. All parent have a hell of a job. I'm sorry to be so off topic SS

JAK
2007-02-07, 23:42
No I started it. I like to wax poetic now and then. Yeah I know what you mean. There is a fine line. In a situation like the movie life is beautiful you would try and protect them from everything, but here where I live its like la la land. Of course the hardest thing to protect them from is our own demons, and we all have those I suppose. Cheers.

shooter
2007-03-05, 16:29
quaker instant grits or oat meal for breakfast,dinner and supper what ever i kill or catch.plan b grits or oatmeal.

SowthEfrikan
2007-03-18, 10:56
There's a certain simplicity about your menu that's very appealing, shooter. I'm the hiker who travels with oatmeal and dried nuts and fruit for breakies, then tortillas, bacon, cheddar cheese and sundried tomatoes for lunch, with supper usually a Mountain House meal, supplemented by dried veggies, flavoured with olive oil, salt and pepper. Snacks include biltong, Lifesaver gummies, dried apple, nuts, and chocolate in cold weather. Emergency fodder are Clif and Lara bars. I also usually carried boiled, peeled eggs out for the first day. Eating is one of the great pleasures of the trail. Drinks are usually Earl Grey Tea in summer and mint-flavoured hot chocolate with marshmallows in winter. Now you know where all the weight is.

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-05, 16:47
Now you know where all the weight is.

All my pack weight comes from a sleeping pad and vodka lol. I've made hamburger in the bush out of soaked and mashed worms cooked on a flat rock.

oops56
2007-04-05, 17:48
Hello sonthfrikan where is this hiking trail sounds like you only have enough food for 10 miles i like to set up some place for take out for you he he

Bear
2007-04-05, 19:40
You sure don't want to hike with Rhino! I would have to be some kind of hungry, or drunk, to eat worms. Is the vodka to wash down the taste or work up the nerve?
I'll just add some weight to my pack and forget the worms.
I think I see how your sleeping bag gets so dirty.

Frolicking Dino
2007-04-05, 20:40
Fried worms are pretty tasty. If you get hungry enough, you become willing to try foods that you would normally pass up.

One of my close friends from high school was a victim of thalidomide. His arms were tiny and attached sideways, but his hands normal size and backwards. It was a crying shame as this guy had all kinds of musical talent, but he was really limited as to what insturments he could play.

Take-a-knee
2007-04-10, 22:13
Fried worms taste like bacon...really, with a little added grit (not grits). It is amazing what you'll eat in SERE school.

Iceman
2007-04-11, 00:09
I have eaten many a bad bug, on a dare or after a few too many hits off the jug. My hunting buddy ate a slug just for schittz and grins. From last years griddle crust to diggin the eye out of a pigs cranium off the spit, I have eaten things that make most folks squirm. Then FEAR FACTOR turned me into a lightweight. Stole our thunder. Ruined my campfire stories. :mad:

deadeye
2007-04-11, 09:36
Take worm, catch fish, eat fish, taste much better.

Iceman
2007-04-11, 09:57
It appears we were doing this backwards, thanks for the tip! :biggrin:

dropkick
2007-04-12, 01:23
On another thread we were talking about Bear Griz and eating bugs brought him back to mind. He was eating maggots that he found on a dead animal in one of the episodes that I watched part of.
I don't have any problem with that, except he was telling the viewers how clean and safe maggots are to eat.

A few years ago they were losing all kinds of birds up around the Great Lakes (and they might still be - I haven't kept track). Anyway when they finally tracked down the cause of the deaths it was botullism passed through the eating of maggots.

The bacteria and the poison didn't affect the maggots, but when it was passed to the birds it killed them and started a new cycle of botullism infected maggots.

I stopped keeping mine inside my lip when ice fishing.

If you knew what killed the corpse I guess they would be ok. And if I was starving I'd probably take a chance, but ants are usually more readily available, and I know they're clean.

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-25, 15:08
parts of pine trees are eatable.
gators have big mouths.

You can makes teas and flavor soups and stuff with many pine needles. THey have more vitamin C than a sack of oranges.

KLeth
2007-04-25, 16:03
On another thread we were talking about Bear Griz and eating bugs brought him back to mind. He was eating maggots that he found on a dead animal in one of the episodes that I watched part of.
I don't have any problem with that, except he was telling the viewers how clean and safe maggots are to eat. I have seen that episode now and I am amazed that he found mealworms and called them maggots.
The show is over-dramatized.

dropkick
2007-04-26, 01:17
I missed the maggot switch wasn't looking close enough.
NOW mealworms, they can be good eating and no worries about botulism.
But I'd probably just eat the meal instead.

-a side note that no one really cares about: I used to raise mealworms. Fed them to my lizards, amphibians, and some of my fish (had a series of fish tanks and several "exotic" pets when I was a kid).

You too can raise mealworms. Just leave some meal uncovered (Quaker Oats works) for a week or so and they'll magically appear (if you wait too long before looking the black beetles are adult mealworms).

sailingsoul
2007-04-26, 01:46
Just leave some meal uncovered (Quaker Oats works) for a week or so and they'll magically appear (if you wait too long before looking the black beetles are adult mealworms). Where did they come from? Do the black beetles fly or just crawl? :dontknow:
Maybe the meal worm fairy brought them while you were asleep! :hmmmm2: SS:captain:

Truckin
2007-05-14, 21:36
Ramen, discard the spice pack before leaving. Drain the water after cooking, add 1 ounce olive oil, basil, grated parmesan, and salt and pepper to taste. Violia! awesome pasta dish.

I'll usually take powdered Idaho potatoes (like the southwestern kind) as a side dish for supper. Go great together.

I still have trouble reaching my 5000 calories a day though (without making my food sack enormous). What kind of lightweight snacks do you guys use? :albertein

Take-a-knee
2007-05-14, 22:33
Planters Energy mix, 1600 calories in a nine ounce can.

MetRx meal replacement packets, 260 cal. 38 grams protein. Mixed with water it is palatable, mixed with a "juice box" of soy milk, it is tasty.

KLeth
2007-05-15, 01:53
Salted/smoked nuts, jerky, chocolate and logan bread http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g50/kleth/Hiking/fire.gif

dropkick
2007-05-15, 01:58
Where did they come from? Do the black beetles fly or just crawl? :dontknow:
Maybe the meal worm fairy brought them while you were asleep! :hmmmm2: SS:captain:
Didn't your Dad ever tell you about the birds and the beetles?

Actually, I don't have a clue where they come from.
Already existing eggs in the meal?
Human beings do eat a lot of insect eggs and carcasses in their food and don't even know they did it (appetizing thought).

Never saw a beetle approach the open container, the larva just magically appeared (though the beetles do like the dark so I might have missed it).

The beetles have wings, but as far as I can recall I never saw one fly.
On the other hand, once I had the mealworms started I would close the top of the container with a piece of cloth and a rubber band. They didn't really have anywhere they could fly too.

-Oh if you decide to do this, after you get worms started put a little cut apple or potato on top of the meal - provides water for them.