PDA

View Full Version : Jellyfied alcohol in home made stove?



Whitesmoke
2005-02-09, 13:19
Anyone every try jellyfied alcohol in their homemade stove? Not sure if it will work well or not since these stoves rely on evaporation of the alcohol to work right. But I'd think it would still evaporate once burning....?

I thought maybe we could get a longer burn using the jelly stuff....

They make it for lighting pellet stoves with....I have a bottle of it at our cabin that I light the pellet stove with and it seems to work well for that purpose.

Streamweaver
2005-02-09, 13:27
Sterno is jellied alcohol ,and it doesnt really work as well as denatured or heet etc. it is heavier and it never really gets all that hot .im not sure exactly what type of alcohol they use in sterno so jellied denatured may have some benefits.im sure others here could answer this question better but to me the extra weight and less btu,s arent worth it. Streamweaver

SGT Rock
2005-02-09, 13:59
If I remember correctly Sterno contains Methyl alcohol mixed with calcium acetate. I think the problem with jelly alcohol (besides the vaporization process) is that some of the energy is spent burning off some of the additive. Might be good for a simmer option if you want to simmer over the stove.

Major Slacker
2005-02-09, 16:05
I have a couple of .5 liter bottles of Sterno mixed with denatured alcohol that I sometimes use in stoves. I wanted the Sterno cans to make some stoves, but I was too cheap to just throw the stuff away. I don't know the exact ratio, but it's one can of Sterno and the bottle filled the rest of the way with denatured alcohol.

PRO: The mixture burns cooler and slower than straight denatured alcohol, so it can make a hot burning stove more efficient.

CON: It leaves a crispy residue after everything else burns away. There is also a surprising amount of foreign matter in the Sterno. The gunk clogs up stoves with tiny burner holes and stoves filled with fiberglass or perlite. The gunk can also clog up squirt tops on fuel bottles.

katesdad
2005-02-18, 15:12
Can you get a product called "Greenheat" Stateside?

Here in the UK an organisation into environmental issues has come up with a means of converting green biomass into alcohol based gel fuels.

I use the bottled version for starting BBQ's, and they also sell it in sachets that have about 50mg of the stuff.

I find the sachets really useful in the field as they're light, and you can pack a lot in a small (and irregular) space. One sachet burns for about 20 minutes, and is enough to boil a canteen cup of water in about 12 (tested during the summer, I imagine it would differ in colder weather.

Great stuff for soldiers, esopecially over solid fuel tabs, as it doesn't produce all that black smoke (read: please bad guy shoot over here at my smoke signal), leaves no residue, and smells better than the hexamine we get over here.

Just a thought ... now back to the cold and wet!

Larry
Bedford, UK

Lanthar
2005-02-18, 15:54
greenheat? interesting

Jim Henderson
2005-02-19, 13:57
I have seen bottles of jellied alcohol in the candles and lanterns section of variety stores. This alcohol is more the consistency of shampoo and pours out in a similar way.

Maybe this would work better if you are determined to use this kind of fuel. Don't know how it compares to Sterno which is more solid than jelly like.

I have seen it at Bi-Marts in the Northwest.

Jim Henderson

Aussie Nutter
2005-02-26, 04:36
I saw these cans once that were full of jelly that you just opened, put a little stand on top that weighs like nothin and threw a match at. BUT who wants to carry the used cans around. Anyone know what im taking about and has used them? If that fuel is able to be stored like shampoo do you even need a stove, wouldn't a rock make a nice spot to pour the gear onto and light it up with some others to make a pot stand out of. Just an idea, let me know if it sux. :shot:

Streamweaver
2005-02-26, 11:52
I saw these cans once that were full of jelly that you just opened, put a little stand on top that weighs like nothin and threw a match at. BUT who wants to carry the used cans around. Anyone know what im taking about and has used them? If that fuel is able to be stored like shampoo do you even need a stove, wouldn't a rock make a nice spot to pour the gear onto and light it up with some others to make a pot stand out of. Just an idea, let me know if it sux. :shot:

what you describe soundslike sterno,it comes in a can that looks sorta like a little paint or stain can.sterno works better for keeping food warm than actually cooking it.most of the sterno type stoves ive seen are actually pretty heavy,at least when you compare them to the potstands for pepsi type stoves.your idea for putting the fuel on a rock would work,ive done it using esbitand trioxane but its best to put down a peice of aluminum foil first because these fuels including the sterno will leave residue on the rock. Streamweaver

unbreakable
2005-03-09, 15:09
A friend of mine showed me how he stuffs cotton balls into his home-made stove, kind of loosly but a bunch. saturates with alcohol and lights. He used a varnish can for the base so it's resealable with it's own lid. once soaked they act like a wick and actually aid in efficient use of the alcohol plus they can be removed as an antiseptic in case of a cut or bite. likewise it removes the need for an additional source of alcohol for short trips. in conjunction a piece of tin with the top edge serated held on with a hose clamp so that it can be slid down around the can for stowage. works like a charm, no holes to punch, no extra alcohol container, fully collapsable and dirt cheap plus the added first aid tool and minimal chance of spillage.

Major Slacker
2005-03-10, 14:37
… they can be removed as an antiseptic in case of a cut or bite…
I hope he's using isopropyl (which doesn't burn well in a stove) or pure ethanol. Denatured alcohol contains methanol, a toxin that would be absorbed through the skin if applied as an antiseptic.

unbreakable
2005-03-10, 18:02
Iso. it doesnt burn as well but works

Major Slacker
2005-03-11, 18:03
…a piece of tin with the top edge serated held on with a hose clamp…
I found a hose clamp today, remembered this post, brought the clamp home, cut it down to fit a 2.5" - 3" diameter can and weighed it: 0.95 oz. That's about half the combined weight of my stove, base, windscreen, pot and lid. Bummer.