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KeyMeKoe
2005-02-14, 00:12
I am planning a trip to Southeast Alaska. Does anyone have experience hammock camping in Brown Bear country?

Jim Henderson
2005-02-14, 14:31
Sandwiches. That is what a hammock in Brown Bear country reminds me of. The old Farside comic had one where some bears come up on some campers in their sleeping bags. The bears are delighted and say "sandwiches".

I have no experience in hammocks and none in Brown Bear country so can't speak from real knowledge. I would definitely hang my hammock somewhere that it is NOT in a game trail or likely path. I certainly wouldn't keep any food in my hammock and I would make sure I don't smell like bacon in my sleeping gear.

I would assume the usual tips you can read in many outdoor mags would be valid. I would guess you aren't in much more risk in a hammock than a bag on the ground in bear country, other than being at "proper dining height" ;^)

Good Luck,

Jim Henderson

Sgathak
2005-02-14, 17:49
1. Follow usual "bear rules"... follow them closely.
2. Carry Bear Spray... not "mace", Bear spray. Different things.
3. Carry a BIG gun. SE Alaska is big boy country... you shouldnt have any problems, but you dont want to know what happens if you do.

The Hammocker
2005-02-14, 20:02
try to hang the hammock high, climb the tree and hope the bear don't deside to figure out whats up in that tree. :biggrin:

deadeye
2005-02-14, 22:21
Think "Pinata" just like a bear thinks.

Lanthar
2005-02-15, 11:00
try to hang the hammock high, climb the tree and hope the bear don't deside to figure out whats up in that tree. :biggrin:

Gotta agree with deadeye... this screams pinata...

The Hammocker
2005-02-15, 19:55
true :biggrin:

Iceman
2005-03-03, 02:29
Turk, with so many encounters under your belt, are you really sure you wouldn't like a bit of firepower on your hip, your chances of a bad encounter are increasing each time, no? Call me a chicken, but I would sleep a lot better with a large caliber weapon laying around, than not. Maybe that Smith and Wesson .50 cal revolver ain't such a bad thing afterall? Even as a last option? Actually here in Washington, we are noticing increased problems with cougars since our state outlawed hound hunting of cougar and bear. Cougar numbers are way up, and so are cougar encounters. I have two kids who enjoy the outdoors with me, and I carry for this reason also. Great insight into bear habits.

Sgathak
2005-03-03, 18:38
From what I understand, in America, guns are everywhere and very easy to own them, carry then and even use them regularly.

Not picking on you... its just the way the "rest of the world" sees the US is just... WOW! Every time I see this a statement like the above I get the same "WOW" feeling. Its like everyone thinks the whole US is still trapped in either 1800s Wild Wild West, or the entire country is just a Suburb of South Central LA.

Yes, our nation is founded on the belief that it is a RIGHT (even if the law makers dont know that) for everyone to keep a bear arms... Which means the government cant take them away, it does not mean that every other person is walking the street with a 6-shooter on their hip. In fact, Id say most people in the woods (unless its hunting season - and I *KNOW* Canada has those) are not armed.

I know that wasnt your point - Im just ranting.

oneshot
2005-06-01, 08:14
Turk, with so many encounters under your belt, are you really sure you wouldn't like a bit of firepower on your hip, your chances of a bad encounter are increasing each time, no? Call me a chicken, but I would sleep a lot better with a large caliber weapon laying around, than not. Maybe that Smith and Wesson .50 cal revolver ain't such a bad thing afterall? Even as a last option? Actually here in Washington, we are noticing increased problems with cougars since our state outlawed hound hunting of cougar and bear. Cougar numbers are way up, and so are cougar encounters. I have two kids who enjoy the outdoors with me, and I carry for this reason also. Great insight into bear habits.
Well I am a coyote hunter (sport not pro) and I have decided long ago not to call by myself because of the chance of encountering a lion. I was told by a friend who has had alot of experience with cougars that the only defense with a cougar , unless he is very young or very stupid , is to have another hunter with you. My friend told me that in a cougar attack the first and most likely the last thing you will feel is a pain in the back of your neck as the kitty grabs you by the neck. Cougar attacks here in the peoples republic of california aren't common but since 1990 the cougar population has gone from 600 to over 6000. With the number of people pouring in increases encounters with cougars are going up and will go up more as they start looking for new target rich territory.
That being said,I am inclined to pack a shotgun with me for close shots and for the rare, young or stupid, lion. When camping I usually don't pack and try to remember all the advice I've read on bear avoidance techniques, since packing in a state or national park is a no no.

Boyd

Doctari
2005-06-22, 05:08
I don't hammock, yet. However as hmmocks, tents & tarps are (Mostly) made of the same stuff, I thought I would add a comment. It actually is a reply to many who questioned my using a tarp with: "But a tarp dosn't protect you from the bears" Unless your tent or etc. is made of kevlar, that nylon tent's "Protection" means it will take a bear about 0.03 seconds longer to get to you. From that point of view, if following the advice on the above posts, a hammock (or tarp) should be as "safe" as a tent.

Everything is "bear resistant" but tissue paper dosn't resist very long.

Doctari.

PKH
2005-06-22, 08:41
And another old Far side cartoon:

Two polar bears in the act of breaking into an igloo - grinning at each other.

"Oh hey, don't you just love these things? Crunchy on the outside, all soft and chewy on the inside?

Cheers,
PKH

dropkick
2005-06-29, 18:25
Jeez, the answer seems simple to me (a none hammock hiker) all you need to do is pick 2 trees about 10 feet apart and put your hammock on a line between them about 15 feet up.... :hmmmm: :withstupi :stupido2:

Sure, there might be a few small technical problems with this idea, but I've done the hard part and come up with the basic concept, I have faith you can overcome any small problems.