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Fox
2005-02-19, 04:36
One thing I used when out in the woods hunting for over a week was a pack of 'sentless wipes'. Originally intended as a full body wipe and wash for hunters to remove body odor without rinsing before heading out into the woods, this works incredibly well for the purpose (I've had deer walk within six feet of me) and is remarkably non-irritant, even on sensitive parts.

For backpacking, depending on the duration of the trip, I'd either trim them down or repack them in a ziplock bag, and trim to the needed size on site.

I like trying to be low/no impact and scent free on whatever expeditions I go on- if I can get closer to the wildlife, all the better. =)

Here's the site.

http://www.bowhunting.net/scentshield/huntersbg.htm

Lanthar
2005-02-19, 18:54
saw something similar at cabela's the other week

Turk
2005-03-01, 19:38
Little trick I picked up for staying clean on those long sweatty treks when you dont have a water source to bathe in, or its just too darn cold.

Wet Wipes (bottle of 120) = 3$ at WalMart
Not to be confused with baby wipes. The wet wipes contain better cleaning agents, also alcohol based, so it takes the salt and grime off the skin.


The wipes dispense individually. Pull them all out and jam them into a bread bag. Twist the bread bag and put it into the smallest compression stuff sack you have. The one I use for this purpose is 2.5" by 8" and will compress down to 2.5" x 4.5" You now have a nicely compressed and waterproof shower system. For really tough grime, use rinseless hand cleaner (not the gritty abrasive kind ouch! unless you are into that) in a small bottle.

100 wipes will easily give you 20 days of waterless showers. And that is using a generous 5 wipes per shower.

Fox
2005-03-01, 20:54
No-Rinse wipes etc (http://www.norinse.com)

These look really nice. I'd be concerned about using anything you don't rinse off on *cough* ladyparts*cough*:embarasse because of all the bacteriological balance/sensitive skin problems one could run into, but the number of female testimonials, and the fact hospitals use these to keep patients clean sells them for me. It seems you can heat them up, too... mmmmm hot sponge bath...
:bath:

Here's one of the better sources I've seen, though I'm sure there are others out there... most seem to be in 'bulk' though...
Internet Grocer (http://www.internet-grocer.net/no-rinse.htm)

Sgathak
2005-03-02, 05:26
I just slather on Purell. Dilute in water if wanted.

Lanthar
2005-03-03, 10:19
I just slather on Purell. Dilute in water if wanted.

*trying to decide if beginning rant on the evils of purell and the whole anti-bacterial / triclosan marketing campaign is actually worth it*

Sgathak
2005-03-03, 18:26
No.... please... dont be shy... :rolleyes:

Seriously, Purelle isnt that big of a deal. You dont want to go swimming in it, but its not exactly the great satan either.

Hog On Ice
2005-03-03, 19:37
I have been known to use Purell for the pits - especially if there is some indication that I may be getting some chaffing there - catch it early enough and the hand sanitizer seems to keep it from developing worse - of course if I am a little late in the application then my eyes bug out when I hit my crotch pits with the stuff but such is life.

Lanthar
2005-03-03, 20:57
No.... please... dont be shy... :rolleyes:

Seriously, Purelle isnt that big of a deal. You dont want to go swimming in it, but its not exactly the great satan either.

I guess Purell itself isn't evil, but the main active ingredient, Triclosan, is. Yes, triclosan will kill 99+% of bacteria (that's why it can be labelled anti-bacterial), but it does so only when given an exposure time of 15+ minutes... @ 120+ deg F... since when can you get those conditions on your skin? btw - increased exposure time doesn't help. So, what is happening with the propagation of and missapplication of triclosan, is that it is killing the least robust bacteria (which are often benign or helpful), and leaving less competition for the more robust (aka stronger) bacteria are left with less competition for the nutrients on our skin. on top of that we flush it into our sewers and allow it into nature in massive quantities. What you REALLY need to be using is an anti-septic.
Triclosan (aka anti-bacterial) is simply markitng hype and will ultimately cause a lot of probelms.
Simple cleanliness is far more effective than any anti-bacterial.

Salvelinus
2005-03-03, 22:22
After the hospital where I work installed Purell dispensers in every room, our nosocomial infection (ie hospital-acquired) rates dropped through the floor. About a year ago, we changed vendors, and in the two-or-three week period in between our infection rates soared. It's very interesting when you look at nosocomial rates over the year--big spike during that time. BTW, we're talking about some nasty bugs here.

Also, the main disinfecting ingredient in Purell is alcohol. It doesn't contain triclosan. That is usually the antibacterial ingredient in soap.

--Scott

SGT Rock
2005-03-04, 09:09
Can you wash your hair and pots with it?

Lanthar
2005-03-04, 11:13
After the hospital where I work installed Purell dispensers in every room, our nosocomial infection (ie hospital-acquired) rates dropped through the floor. About a year ago, we changed vendors, and in the two-or-three week period in between our infection rates soared. It's very interesting when you look at nosocomial rates over the year--big spike during that time. BTW, we're talking about some nasty bugs here.

Also, the main disinfecting ingredient in Purell is alcohol. It doesn't contain triclosan. That is usually the antibacterial ingredient in soap.

--Scott

hmm... alchohol (isoprop) based is actually pretty perfect for this, I could have swore that I saw the main ingredient on purell as triclosan... I could easily be misremembering which bottle I read it on... hmmm... i need to relook at purell specifically...

deadeye
2005-03-04, 11:58
Yep, no need to rant about creating superbugs with improper use of antibiotics. Purell uses alcohol, an antiseptic. I keep a small squeeze bottle in my belt for handwashing, for everything else I use a small bar of unscented soap (ivory, nutragena, etc.) and a small cloth.

Mutinousdoug
2005-03-04, 13:27
A google search will bring up the Purell website which contains the ingredients of the stuff: 62% Alcohol, the rest appears to be glycerin and emolients. Looks pretty harmless.

Lanthar
2005-03-04, 14:31
A google search will bring up the Purell website which contains the ingredients of the stuff: 62% Alcohol, the rest appears to be glycerin and emolients. Looks pretty harmless.

hmm... must have been some other anti-bacterial hand thing I saw, and assumed purell was the same...


29. IS PURELL INSTANT HAND SANITIZER FLAMMABLE?
PURELL Instant Hand Sanitizer is flammable but requires a flame, spark, or other ignition source. PURELL products are safe when used, handled, and stored as directed.

:D w00t! It's dual use!

Mutinousdoug
2005-03-04, 15:27
Can anyone think of a reason to carry a Purell type product instead of an increased supply of ETOH fuel? Other than to keep it separate so you don't have to eat cold oatmeal the last day of your hike?

Sgathak
2005-03-04, 16:16
Rock, I keep my head buzzed down in a "screamin' eagle" so my hair washing needs are minimal. mostly they are scalp washing needs.... I havent had a problem, but you have to be careful or your scalp will dry out. It CAN be used for pot cleaning - or at least killing the bugs that might grow. It doesnt have that nice soapy effect that a few drops of Dr Bronners does.

Doug, I prefer Purell for cleaning because its gelled. Less likely to end up with a handful of cleaner/fuel on the ground. And unless it were pure ethyl, I dont think Id want it on my skin for too long. Who knows what denaturing ingredients will do to you?

Lanthar
2005-03-04, 16:33
Doug, I prefer Purell for cleaning because its gelled. Less likely to end up with a handful of cleaner/fuel on the ground. And unless it were pure ethyl, I dont think Id want it on my skin for too long. Who knows what denaturing ingredients will do to you?

ditto, methanol can be absorbed through the skin.

Major Slacker
2005-03-04, 17:52
Am I the only one who still sponge bathes with a boiled bandana?

blackdog
2005-03-04, 18:25
You should try using Enjo microfiber stuff. A small green pad takes care of the pots and a pink pad takes care of the skin. ...with just a spray of cold water. It's actually quite amazing to see the green fur remove greasy residue from a pot with no chemicals at all.

I use all sorts of Enjo stuff at home too.

http://www.enjousa.com/

fsck, i'm sounding more like a damn salesman every day. *beats himself up* But the fuzzy stuff works nonetheless.

deadeye
2005-03-04, 19:49
Unfortunately, synthetics get real funky real fast, so I stick with cotton. Thanks to Major Slacker, I'll start boiling a bandana - I carry 2 of 'em anyway, and a good boil wouln't hurt either one.

blackdog
2005-03-05, 06:00
Unfortunately, synthetics get real funky real fast, so I stick with cotton.
I was a sceptic too... But to each his own.

Another thing to try is tea tree oil. Very antiseptic and great for bee stings and such too. A bottle of it is tiny and worth adding to the fix-it-bag, if you haven't already.

SGT Rock
2005-03-05, 09:41
Kep sopme fabreeze at home for treating your stuff after the hike, it does help.

deadeye
2005-03-05, 09:50
I'm always skeptical, dut I'll be trying the Enjo stuff, thanks, Dog