PDA

View Full Version : Food for a base camp



Fox
2005-02-20, 20:47
My husband and I were going to take the truck to a friend of ours, and then just hike a couple miles into the woods, set up a base camp and stay out there a few days. This would likely mean we wouldn't have to worry about gear weight as much. The question is- what's the practicality of taking MREs and other store-bought dehydrated food if the focus was more on quality than weight conservation?

SGT Rock
2005-02-20, 20:50
I am probably biased by many years of eating them, but MREs suck IMO.

jimtanker
2005-02-21, 01:04
Oh, come on top!

Remember the old dehydrated beef patty? That one always was and always will be my favorite.

Sgathak
2005-02-21, 01:13
There are some decent MREs... the newer ones arnt bad, and theres a novelty factor when you didnt spend two months in the desert eatting 3 of those gut bombs a day.

If your "base camping", you can do MREs, the Chicken/Salmon/Tuna/Beef retorts, fresh veggies, dried stuff.... you can really get away with alot more if your willing to haul it, knowing your only doing 2-3 miles

Jim Henderson
2005-02-21, 14:15
I've always had a fondness for bringing a really big frozen steak rolled up in my sleeping bag along with some corn on the cob wrapped in foil for the first night's dinner.

Since you are not far off, you can pretty much take almost any food you like.

I like most of the MRE's but one company makes some of the better varieties.

www.longlifefood.com has very good MRE's and allows you essentially custom make your MRE by selecting which entrees and accessory packs are included. They even have some premium MRE foods like Smoked Salmon Fillet, Veggie Burgers, Manicotti, Teriyaki and others from time to time. They have a wide selection of "pound cakes" and fruits in MRE packs. They are a little pricey on some things but often have very good sales. I like their foods and would recommend them.

Have fun,

Jim Henderson

fly.fast
2005-02-22, 00:01
Wow. My experience as a Scouter actually applies.

Be creative. You don't have to worry about weight and so you have a lot of options.

Have you ever used a dutch oven? You can bake -- bread, cake, pie, cobbler, etc. You can cook meats, casseroles, chili, soups, or my favorite lately -- red beans and rice with cornbread.

Charcoal is my favorite base camp cooking fire. You can do about anything that you like in a 2-day base camp.

Have fun.

Lanthar
2005-02-22, 00:19
Wow. My experience as a Scouter actually applies.

Be creative. You don't have to worry about weight and so you have a lot of options.

Have you ever used a dutch oven? You can bake -- bread, cake, pie, cobbler, etc. You can cook meats, casseroles, chili, soups, or my favorite lately -- red beans and rice with cornbread.

Charcoal is my favorite base camp cooking fire. You can do about anything that you like in a 2-day base camp.

Have fun.

ditto, if you're only going a little ways, don't skip on the food. food goes a LONG way toward making a fun basecamp expereince.

Pappyhighlife
2005-02-23, 13:28
Well Top Soldier as I said many times, that MRE is a very versatile meal.
I guess cause when I was in we ate K-Rats and C-Rats. Now that was puke chow! The kids like the MRE as well. For those of you out there that use the MRE I found a place that sells individual meals cheap www.theepicenter.com
But for the base camp I use the Dutch oven as well. I use the lid for frying and the oven for the rest. I found that cooking anything with large amounts of tomatoe sauce makes for an acidic taste.

Lanthar
2005-02-24, 12:05
anyone looked at gsioutdoors.com cast aluminum dutch oven? everythign I cook in a dutch over is in another pan / bot anyways, so I'm not real conerned with any aluminum oxide scratching off...

Sgathak
2005-02-24, 13:26
Ive looked at the GSI dutch oven, but am not sure Id use it. The main reason is that cast iron has a mediating effect. It spreads out the heat, absorbs alot of it initially, and makes for an overall even temp. I dont know how aluminum would do that.

My new fav cast iron cooker are African Potjie (pronounced Poi-key) pots.