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Iceman
2005-03-08, 01:49
Ok, I sure didn't think I would care, but here I am considering trying to shave weight out of my pack. The question is, what type of household scale are all of you lightweight experts using at your home? Any help you can share would be great. :adore:

I may even want to weight the few alcohol stoves I have been building at home...

jimtanker
2005-03-08, 02:03
Icee -- go to the local neighborhood post office. Your tax money pays for that scale that they have out in the lobby.

Yea, I get funny looks. And for using the scale too.

bearbag hanger
2005-03-08, 05:41
Any office supply store has them - Office Max, Staples, etc. They cost quite a bit more than a standard postal scale, maybe around $35 and up? You could easily spend $100 on a good one. Generally limited to about 10 lbs with .2 oz accuracy.

SGT Rock
2005-03-08, 11:55
I have a roayal EX3 with a 3 pound limit. Comes from Wal-Mart in the office supply section. They are often hidden and it usually takes me a while looking to find them.

deadeye
2005-03-08, 13:25
Most kitchen stores also have them, typically in ounces with a 4 to 6 pound limit, and pretty cheap.

blackdog
2005-03-08, 14:37
This could be a good time to start shaving kilos and grams off your gear instead of pounds and ounces... *nudge nudge*

Turk
2005-03-08, 17:41
Go to the sporting goods section of Walmart and look at the fishing section. Usually they only carry these 3-seasons, but you get lucky at some Walmarts. Fish scales are great for doing final pack weights. The one I found there was also digital and accurate to +/- 1 oz. Great because it has a hook on it and you can figure out weights of bulky or awkward items by hanging them.

Major Slacker
2005-03-16, 07:45
For anything under 3 pounds I use my wife's Weight Watchers diet scale.

Before I quit, I used the UPS/FedEx scale at work to weigh my full pack. They said I could visit anytime, buuuut I think maybe next time I'll try the post office or the neighborhood UPS / Mailboxes, Etc. store.

Just Jeff
2005-03-16, 08:04
I used an analog kitchen scale from the Walmart kitchen section. It cost $5, has a 3 lbs limit, and is accurate to .5 oz.

Salvelinus
2005-03-16, 21:43
I got one from Office Max/Depot/whateveritwas for about $30. There were cheaper and much more expensive ones, but I felt this one suited me best.

It is a "Pelouze" brand with a 5 lb limit, accurate to .1 oz or 1 gram and has a "Tare" function which allows you to weigh the contents of a container only, without the weight of the container. I love it. No more Sunday runs up to work to use the scale there!

--Scott

KLeth
2005-03-17, 01:41
This could be a good time to start shaving kilos and grams off your gear instead of pounds and ounces... *nudge nudge*
Metrics . . . . . Now I think you're asking too much ! :biggrin: The "LITTLE" issue that has cost two Mars missions and quite a few problems for aviators.

I use a person scale that goes to 150kg and weighs within 100g. Then I suit up with boots, jacket, pack ect. and measures the total weight - Then I deduct my own weight that I measure afterwards.
To measure up food, trim gear or to select gear I use an old digital kitchen scale, that has a limit of 1½kg and measures within 5g.
I'm no ultralight hiker - Hence the boots - But I like to keep my pack trimmed to the bare necessities.

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-17, 04:00
I usually do one one three things.
1. Weigh at the post office
2. Weigh at the general store near me
3. Send it with wife to hospital to be weighed

The last thing I weighed I carried with me to the doctor and weighed it on one of the scales they use for infants. The doctor didnt even ask why. She knows better by now.

Aussie Nutter
2005-03-17, 04:45
I use a metric kitchen scale with 20g incriments that can go as high as 5kg and has enough accuracy for what i want. Bathroom scales weigh heavy things like my dog and my pack by subtracting my weight from total.

I have so much trouble with your pounds and ounces i cant even add them together. Does this mean im dumb or is your system just real screwed up?

blackdog
2005-03-17, 09:17
I have so much trouble with your pounds and ounces i cant even add them together. Does this mean im dumb or is your system just real screwed up?
I won't speculate on that, Oz. ;) One thing is certain, though, a unified measuring system would be nice. But all systems have some advantages that warrant their use. These are also very old habits, and as such very hard to break.

Here's a tool for making things easier:
http://onlineconversion.com/weight_common.htm

youngblood
2005-03-17, 09:23
...I have so much trouble with your pounds and ounces i cant even add them together. Does this mean im dumb or is your system just real screwed up?
Yep... to the second part of the question. :biggrin: But in our defense, ... uhh... uhhh... its OUR system.

Youngblood

peter_pan
2005-03-17, 10:04
Kilos and grams is not about metrics....it is about recalibrating your thinking and measuring.......Person who evaluates by pounds often carries a heavy pack....person who evaluates by ounces often carries a significantly lighter pack.....person who thinks and evaluates by grams often carries the lightest pack, or at least a lighter still pack.


Helium pack straps might be nice. :idea:

SGT Rock
2005-03-17, 11:32
I have so much trouble with your pounds and ounces i cant even add them together. Does this mean im dumb or is your system just real screwed up?

In our defense, we owe our system to the British.

therob
2005-03-18, 00:42
Ive been wondering the same thing about scales. I never new they were so readily available thru out town. My daughter will be happy when I buy one tomorrow. I can hear her now, "wow daddy no more holding me in one arm and the pack in the other".

Rage in a Cage
2005-03-18, 03:06
Ive been wondering the same thing about scales. I never new they were so readily available thru out town. My daughter will be happy when I buy one tomorrow. I can hear her now, "wow daddy no more holding me in one arm and the pack in the other".
That sounds like something I would do.=)

atraildreamer
2006-06-17, 06:15
I have so much trouble with your pounds and ounces i cant even add them together. Does this mean im dumb or is your system just real screwed up?

Let's see... :rolleyes: you use a measuring system invented by the French, :stupido3: you drive on the wrong side of the road, :captain: you make a great beer (Foster's) :beerglass , but the can melts when it is made into an alcohol stove. :bawling:, and, finally, you sent us Crocodile Dundee ! :eek: "nuff said! :biggrin:

dropkick
2006-06-17, 07:09
The reason why they drive on the wrong side of the road: when they pass someone going the other direction their sword arm (right) will be facing the other person, in case they wish to hack at them.

Brought to you by dropkick, perveyor of useless trivia.

Frolicking Dino
2006-06-17, 10:04
The American system is far more confusing and harder to use than the metric system. I prefer the metric system.

I use a kitchen scale for weighing small items at home (accurate to .5 oz / 14.18 gm) and a fish scale (accurate to 1 oz / 38.35 gm) for the big / awkward stuff. I am much like Oz Nutter in that I'm not concerned about the weight being accurate to a minute degree - I just want to know about how much something weighs.

Take-a-knee
2006-06-17, 12:09
I have a Lyman Digital trigger pull gauge that will weigh up to 10# down to fractions of an ounce, it was $50 though. If you don't have triggers to measure it wouldn't be a good buy. You have to use it gingerly to get a accurate reading. I bought one of those five dollar kitchen scales at Wal Mart it seems to be accurate enough. The Post office scale is far and away the best "buy". I have one of those 50# hanging scales in the garage so I can weigh the loaded pack.

Turk
2006-06-17, 12:43
Has anyone else run into this problem? :

You weigh items on one scale. Kitchen, sleep system,
clothing, emergency etc. Then break those kits down and
completely weigh every individual item. Generate a chart and total up the
math to arrive at a total wt. Then load everything into a pack, and weigh
that on a larger scale. Eg: postal, hanging etc. Then do a double take
when your numbers are not even close to each other??

The only answer I can really accept is that my small scale is in some
ways too accurate for some of the things I try and weigh. For example
just by placing one stuff sack on the scale and rotating it even slightly
off the exact center of the scale can result in 2, 3 or even 4 different
wt readings. All these little discrepencies I guess really add up when
you weigh in individual items and simply add up a column of numbers
and compare that to a single weigh in of a loaded pack. I guess I
just never realized how much all those little fractions can amount to
in the end.

Now granted I am not using high-end fancy scales. Perhaps the answer
is as simple as : "buy a better scale system Turk", or "do everything
at the post office". For now I guess I will just have ballpack my overall
wt +/- 1lb. Or trust my more general weigh-ins by individual stuff sack
and category.


... sorry if I am sounding like a gram weenie. I just never thought that
being so anal retentive to properly measure could still result in such
a wide margin for error.

SowthEfrikan
2006-06-17, 16:25
I still have to pick things up that say they are a pound to get a sense of what it actually all means.

Metrics are so much easier.

As for fahrenheit, that's a joke, right? :-)

peter_pan
2006-06-18, 09:20
Turk,

It is called the truncation factor.....add 10 items each weighin 8.4 oz which show as 8 oz each, expected total is 80 oz....Put them all on the scale and you get 84 oz.....

This is why a scale that measures to hundreths or tenths is better.....overall scales that measure in grams is even more accurate.

Pan

PS Your 20.1 oz, 9.4 oz and 0.9 oz items, Total 30.5 oz, shipped yesterday.

Kea
2006-06-18, 15:20
I went to WalMart and got a digital kitchen scale for about $30. Weighs up to 6 pounds, I think, and I go through the process of writing the weighs on the sides of things, full and empty. It's one of the things that I really liked about <u>Lighten Up!</u> and I use it as part of my packing process.

The scale also comes in handy for for kitchen testing and other activities.

Seeker
2006-06-18, 21:16
It is called the truncation factor.....add 10 items each weighin 8.4 oz which show as 8 oz each, expected total is 80 oz....Put them all on the scale and you get 84 oz.....

back a few years ago, when banks first started using computers, they rounded everything off to the nearest cent... some banks processed tens of thousands of equations (stuff like interest on principal) per day... one programmer figured out a way to 'capture' the rounded off bits and have them sent to his own account... made quite a fortune in just a few months, but couldn't keep his mouth shut, so he got caught... since then, they moved the decimal over a few more places, to keep track of it all...

dropkick
2006-06-18, 23:55
I still have to pick things up that say they are a pound to get a sense of what it actually all means.
Metrics are so much easier.
As for fahrenheit, that's a joke, right? :-)
What's a kilo????

In defense of Fahrenheit it's a much more accurate scale, having almost 2 degrees to every degree on the celcius scale (1.8 to 1).

Mr. Celcius based his scale on the freezing and boiling of fresh water at sea level, and had the benefit of the mercury thermometer that Fahrenheit invented.
Mr. Fahrenheit set 0 F on the freezing point of salt water (or as I believe human blood) and what was believed to be human body temperature (100 degrees) (He was 1.8 degrees off - not having the benefit of his later work like Cerlcius did).

So Celcius used water, while Fahrenheit used the human body, and except for his slight errors in measurement Fahrenheit's is clearly the superior scale.

So there nah, nah, nah.... :aetsch:

KLeth
2006-06-19, 01:52
What's a kilo???? Actually it's 1000g or 1 097 769 238 499 215 084 016 780 676 223 electron mass units :biggrin:
Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram):
The kilogram was originally defined as the mass of one litre of pure water at standard atmospheric pressure and at the temperature at which water has its maximum density (3.98 degrees Celsius).

Realize it . . . . There is no future in the Imperial nor the U.S. customary units has any future. Have a hogshead of coffee and a pole/rod of bauget, then wake up to reality . . . . :damnmate:

Does this make sence ?
1 fluid dram or fluidram = 3 fluid scruples = 60 minims

Or are you just Brittish-O-File :fisheye: :angel:

Kea
2006-06-19, 03:38
Realize it . . . . There is no future in the Imperial nor the U.S. customary units has any future. Have a hogshead of coffee and a pole/rod of bauget, then wake up to reality . . . . :damnmate:

I like hundredweights, myself. Had to learn it in order to read anvil markings so I'd know what they weigh. Can even pick up and move the one marked 1 1 00. :biggrin:

That said, the object is to get my pack under 0 1 04 on the next trip, to something more like 0 1 00 or maybe even 0 0 26.

Sorry to report that I haven't mastered pennyweights yet. :)


Kea, who loves ancient and weird measurement systems and teaches her children to do math in them.

blackdog
2006-06-19, 13:06
Kea, who loves ancient and weird measurement systems and teaches her children to do math in them.
You like strange number bases too?

Kea
2006-06-19, 13:51
You like strange number bases too?

And I think that men who can count in binary on their fingers and extremely sexy.

Kea

john pickett
2006-06-19, 19:43
"Does this make sence ?
1 fluid dram or fluidram = 3 fluid scruples = 60 minims "

Kleth,
That makes perfect sense to an Apothecariast.
John Pickett
Former Hospital Corpsman First Class :captain:

dropkick
2006-06-21, 02:27
The kilogram was originally defined as the mass of one litre of pure water at standard atmospheric pressure and at the temperature at which water has its maximum density (3.98 degrees Celsius).

Realize it . . . . There is no future in the Imperial nor the U.S. customary units has any future. Have a hogshead of coffee and a pole/rod of bauget, then wake up to reality . . . . :damnmate:


If you eliminated the air bubbles wouldn't water have it's maximum density in it's solid state, at 0 degrees Celcius?

-Of course ice floats, but if you eliminated the trapped air does it still float?
I'd a lot rather have a bucket of water dumped on my head than a bucket of ice..... But that's probably confusing firmness with density.


The metric system is the work of the devil!!
With my roods, ells, fas, acairs, gills, mutchkins, chopins, jougs, feņirlings, oxgangs, and the other measures, who needs all these new fangled measurements. :damnmate:

KLeth
2006-06-21, 03:03
If you eliminated the air bubbles wouldn't water have it's maximum density in it's solid state, at 0 degrees Celcius? No it's most dense (g/cm3) at the ~4C. Then it begins expanding again - Science is fun :)

-Of course ice floats, but if you eliminated the trapped air does it still float? No, it floats due to the fact that that ice has a lower density (g/cm3) than ice. Try putting a PE bottle filled with boiled water outside at winter and you will see that the bottle expands as the water freezes.

The metric system is the work of the devil!!
With my roods, ells, fas, acairs, gills, mutchkins, chopins, jougs, feņirlings, oxgangs, and the other measures, who needs all these new fangled measurements. :damnmate: I will fight your ancient herectic measurements with my glorious and pure :adore: Metres, Litres and Grams . . . . :dancing2:

Seeker
2006-06-21, 11:17
I will fight your ancient herectic measurements with my glorious and pure :adore: Metres, Litres and Grams . . . . :dancing2:

250ml, or 1 cup... sounds about equal to me... milk measured either way makes my morning oatmeal. :biggrin:

Kea
2006-06-21, 16:51
If you eliminated the air bubbles wouldn't water have it's maximum density in it's solid state, at 0 degrees Celcius?

-Of course ice floats, but if you eliminated the trapped air does it still float?
I'd a lot rather have a bucket of water dumped on my head than a bucket of ice..... But that's probably confusing firmness with density.


Actually no. Water floats because it expands ever so slightly when it freezes, thus making it less dense than the water it might be floating in. This handy feature assures that ice remains on the water's surface, where the Sun can warm and melt it, and thus preventing the Earth from turning into a giant ice ball.

Kea

Kea
2006-06-21, 16:54
I will fight your ancient herectic measurements with my glorious and pure :adore: Metres, Litres and Grams . . . . :dancing2:

Bah. The Metric System is for the weak minded. Anyone can work in base 10, so there is no intellectual challenge at all.

Kea, who last weighed in at 1 3 26

john pickett
2006-06-21, 17:38
"Kea, who last weighed in at 1 3 26"

Kea, would that be 1 pound, 3 shillings, 26 pence?
Or did you last weigh on January 3rd, 1926?
I'm glad my money is base 10. The thought of dealing with the old style Brit currency makes my head hurt. :confused:
John Pickett

Kea
2006-06-21, 18:56
Clearly, they don't teach hundredweights in Texas.