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icedancer
2005-04-05, 19:08
Can someone describe the Speer bugnet and how it attaches? I couldn't find a close-up shot on his site, but it is supposed to be removable, right?

I'm experimenting with homemade and trying to get a handle on 'prior art' before deciding how to start sewing. So far, I know the Hennessey models have the bugnet permanently attached all around, Risk made his Quarterweight with one side attached and the other side weighted. I've also seen Risk and others drape over a ridge line with weights on both sides, and net 'tubes', either full or half length, supported on a ridge line. I've also read descriptions of top entry hammocks with sewn on nets with side zippers or velcro closures. I wasn't clear on whether these openings are horizontal or vertical. Maybe both.

Does that about summarize the possibilites? Any comments on usability, durability? I know some have issues with zipper reliability, or velcro getting stuck to/with unwanted stuff. I would think they also add weight. Is that a valid tradeoff for the possibility of a draped/weighted net not staying in place or fully sealing? Does the weight of the extra material in a draped net offset the savings over velcro or zipper?

I like the idea of not attaching the net permanently, both because it leaves the possibility of doing without it, because it's more easily replaced if damaged, and can be moved from one to another, but I also see problems.

I've draped across a ridgeline, but have had wind gusts blow it around even if weighted. I've rigged an elastic cord under the hammock between two attachments that is connected after getting in, but haven't had any windy nights to test it yet.

I'm also thinking about how a draped net won't stop crawlies (I found myself sharing my bed with a spider a few days ago), and how any top entry will allow bug entry while I'm getting in and out as well.

It seems this will end up to be one of those personal preference questions. The Hennessey gets enthusiastic comments for an attached net, but might be difficult to duplicate at home (not to mention potential claustophobia.) What do you do to minimize problems with side entry or draped/tube nets?

youngblood
2005-04-05, 22:51
Can someone describe the Speer bugnet and how it attaches? I couldn't find a close-up shot on his site, but it is supposed to be removable, right?http://www.hammockcamping.com/Free%20Reports/SewingTips.htm


It seems this will end up to be one of those personal preference questions. The Hennessey gets enthusiastic comments for an attached net, but might be difficult to duplicate at home (not to mention potential claustophobia.) What do you do to minimize problems with side entry or draped/tube nets?I think you have a pretty good handle on the situation. Everyone will agree bugnets are great when bugs are about... but when they are not out, people don't agree. I use a homemake Speer hammock and rarely use the bugnet, I much prefer to not be impeded by the bugnet. Other folks always want a bugnet, I don't understand why, but hey if it makes them happy then there is nothing wrong with it. The Hennessy's, with the side pull outs, sewn in bugnet and bottom entry are specialist in buggy environments... a great jungle hammock. I'm usually in the mountains and I like the open top; I quite often reach out, push off to get it rocking and then fall asleep... like a big baby.

Youngblood

icedancer
2005-04-06, 13:37
That explains the Speer method perfectly, thanks! I notice they use a rectangle for the net instead of using an extended oval shape. Does this result in the material not being taut at the head and foot and drooping onto your face?

youngblood
2005-04-06, 14:07
That explains the Speer method perfectly, thanks! I notice they use a rectangle for the net instead of using an extended oval shape. Does this result in the material not being taut at the head and foot and drooping onto your face?Yeah, the netting does tend to droop... you don't have side pullouts or a spreader bar. You or your insulation are basically the 'spreader bar'.

I don't think taking up material by using an oval shape would help much if that was the only thing you changed, it still would want to droop. I think side pullouts or sometype of spreader bar located on the bugnets ridgeline above your head would be more promising. On occasions when I use it I give it a little thought, but then act like my own spreader bar and forget about it. It's more of an issue when you lay down the center line of the hammock. If you lay on a diagonal you basically open the bugnet up enough to keep it off of your face. If I want to lay down the center line I will either sleep with my hands behind my neck and let my elbows act like a spreader bar or toss a stuff sack or two along my shoulders to open it up enough keep the bugnet away from my face. I can usually figure something to make do. Luckily, I don't often use the bugnet... if I did I might work on that a little more.

The bugnet droop is probably the weakest link for the class of hammocks that don't have side pull outs or spreader bars (Speer, Clark and Byers come to mind), but it isn't that big of deal for me... it might be for you. This is where personal preferences apply. The hammocks that have side pull outs and spreader bars (or poles) have their own weakest links. There are tradeoffs to most everything... shucks, I'm not even perfect.

Youngblood

icedancer
2005-04-07, 15:17
I got my hands on something called a Mosquito Hammock yesterday, but not one currently featured on the mosquitohammock.com like the one in the pictures below. The store didn't have supports strong enough to get in it, but we did string it up. The net was sewn around on three sides with a zipper on the fourth and the top suspended from two tabs placed along the centerline of the canopy from a ridgeline.

The Jungle Hammock uses a stick as a spreader with a shaped canopy and lots of webbing, but I think a simpler version could be done with any net. I could place one attachment point above each shoulder and knee and spread them using found sticks. I will test this tonight using 'fabric around a rock' attachment points to avoid the sewing. I'll tie the spreader to the suspension cords instead of to the attachment point and not bother with trying to use the three extra loops in the middle. I think it might help any configuration. Even if the net is already hanging from a builtin ridgeline, the net could still be suspended from the tarp line for very little additional weight. This probably won't keep the net taut in all planes, but it may be enough to keep it off my face. The biggest problem may be the hammock sagging enough to put strain on the suspension cord. That may be why the setup on the Jungle hammock is so beefy, but I can afford to replace overbuilt with careful use. Now that I think about it, keeping the net taut invites problems.

http://www.mosquitohammock.com/images/picJungleHammockEndView.JPG

http://www.mosquitohammock.com/images/picJungleHammockNet.JPG

youngblood
2005-04-07, 16:42
That's neat. You'll figure something out... you've got the 'make my own gear bug'. Have fun.

Youngblood