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Scout
2005-04-19, 17:24
On my previous hikes I have survived on the following:

Breakfasts:
Cream of wheat
Dried Apricots
Breakfast bar

Lunch:
Hard salami (while it lasts)
Crackers
Soup

Dinner:
Mac-N-Cheese
or
Minute Rice and Stove Top Stuffing combo

Just bought some smaller pots (lighter too!) and am now looking for other ways to cook without having to boil my macaroni noodles (since my pot is much smaller).

Looking at backpacker meals...what do you think?

What other ideas do you suggest?

AddyB
2005-04-19, 18:59
Mine is adambajan@gmail.com

(Gee, I hope this doesn't get me more spam)

Lanthar
2005-04-19, 20:01
at least gmail deals with spam pretty well... you might break up your email and post something like

adam-bajan-AT-gmail.com(remove hyphens)

Just Jeff
2005-04-19, 22:05
http://www.freewebs.com/freezerbagcooking/

And my favorite trail food:
http://www.ediblegear.com/index.html

KLeth
2005-04-20, 01:18
That's a joke, right ? Pretty funny anyway :biggrin:
I'm not sure I would eat anything I had been sweating through for serveral days.

Iceman
2005-04-20, 01:20
Maybe ediblegear should list the calories of their products, or did I miss something. I am trying to lose weight, don't ya' know.

Just Jeff
2005-04-20, 01:36
Maybe ediblegear should list the calories of their products, or did I miss something. I am trying to lose weight, don't ya' know.

I think the calories are listed on the packaging. Why don't you order 1 or 2 and let us know how it turns out.

Try not to sweat in it first, though!

Iceman
2005-04-20, 10:35
I have eaten a lot of nasty things before, but eating my own ( or someone elses) oily, sweat impregnated hiking wear or gear aint going to happen. Have you ever eaten a pine tree, some parts are edible...? I wonder what Eull Gibbons would have thought about eating our gear, when there is so much other good stuff growing in 'them thar hills..."?

Just Jeff
2005-04-20, 12:19
Yeah, I've eaten that layer of pine trees that tastes like oranges. Not bad for a freshen-up!

The gear is a joke, btw. Try to order some and see what it says.

Scout
2005-04-20, 13:41
:damnmate: did we take a rabbit trail away from the original topic!?
Teach me about f00d and water useage!

jimtanker
2005-04-20, 14:04
Try Kraft Easy mac. Just like the stove top kind only, like your title, just add water.

Just Jeff
2005-04-20, 14:36
:damnmate: did we take a rabbit trail away from the original topic!?
Teach me about f00d and water useage!

Lots of stuff is just add water. Just go down the dried foods isle in the grocery store and find something that doesn't have a long boil time. Or let it soak before you boil it.

If it says to add butter, like Lipton meals, add olive oil instead. It's healthier, tastes better (IMO), and lasts longer on the trail because it doesn't separate.

Lipton makes all kinds of easy meals.

Then get the foil packs of tuna, salmon, chicken, oysters, shrimp, etc. The tuna and chicken are tasty and don't have a bad calorie count, but the big kick is the added taste, texture and protein. The shrimp is ok...might be decent if you can find a good Lipton to pair it with. The oysters are pretty good alone, but like the shrimp is pretty low in calories (like 10 per oz). I've heard the ground beef is nasty unless you find a good mix for it. The foil packs don't meet some folks' threshold of 100 calories per ounce, but I'm ok with that.

Mac and cheese is the same...just add water. Add tuna if you want...I even do that at home occasionally.

Couscous is the quintessential hiker food. Add water and you don't even have to wait long. They make sweet varieties for breakfast, plain to mix in with stuff, and flavored to eat alone. I like the chicken flavored.

There are some pretty good soup mixes out there. I had a 3-bean soup (don't remember the brand) that was AWESOME. I just added half the amount of water because I like thicker soups, and it filled me right up. Might have been good with chicken added, but it was already a 3-serving pack so I didn't add anything.

I mixed the foilpack shrimp in with a Zartran's Cajun Rice Dinner mix and it was decent. Would have been better w/o the shrimp, though.

I've eaten Stove Top, but I usually end up with that not-hungry-but-not-satisfied feeling after an hour or two if I don't eat something with it. It tastes good, though.

I usually don't cook a hot breakfast, but if I do I take whole grain oatmeal, brown sugar, raisins, whole almonds. At home, I measure and mix the oatmeal, powdered milk and brown sugar in a ziplock. I'll have the almonds and raisins for trail food anyway, so I just pick one to add to the oatmeal and it's awesome. I eat this for breakfast at work 2-3 times a week.

Same goes for instant grits, cream of wheat, etc.

Powdered milk is good. Make regular old cereal or add it to mixes for a protein and flavor boost. If it's cold outside or if you can put it in a creek overnight, mix it up the night before and let it sit until morning...it'll help get rid of that chalky taste.

If you can find fresh berries, add milk and sugar in the morning and eat it like cereal...yummy!

You've already posted about the commercial backpacker meals...I rarely eat those, but they sure are convenient. There's also an organic company that makes them...they look a lot tastier than the major names, but I forget the company. They package their stuff in clear vacuum packs. Anyone know what company I'm talking about?

There are all kinds of no-cook meals that don't even need water...I usually eat these for lunch. Things like bagels, tortillas, cheeses, stick meats like salami, peanut butter, etc.

Remember, Lipton meals are usually intended as a side item, so if the package says 2-3 servings, it's probably only one serving for a hungry hiker eating it by itself.

There's a hodge-podge of stuff...hope it helps!

And speaking of rabbit trails...set a snare and use your Ramen seasoning...

Mutinousdoug
2005-04-20, 15:04
Scout,
This is a partial list of recipes I take with me. I've used them all, but haven't cooked the hoe cakes on an alcohol stove. Should be just like the frybread.I don't thru hike. I go hike in somewhere, setup a camp and dayhike around to fish or hunt, so I'm not such an ultra-lite guy. I carry two pepsi can stoves to speed things up at breakfast and supper (I know: "The Horror!".)
FWIW:

LENTIL SOUP

Ingredients:
Lentils Onion
Celery Smoked sausage (salami; summer)
Chicken stock Cilantro, coriander and chilies

At Home:
Dice onions, sausage and celery and package together
Chop chilies and package with coriander, chicken stock and cilantro

To Cook:
Soak Beans and rinse. (then I let them soak for a few hours so I don't have to add h2o while they cook)
ROAST DICED ONIONS AND CELERY
WITH HAM OR SAUSAGE IN PAN-NO OIL. Toast them, really.
ADD BEANS, CELANTRO, CORRIANDER, PEPPERS
AND CHICKEN STOCK.
COOK, ADDING WATER AS NEEDED
UNTIL BEANS ARE TENDER. (this works in a cosy. about 20-30 minutes depending on how long they soaked)


COUSCOUS PUDDING (serves 4)

½ C instant couscous (middle-eastern or ethnic section of your grocery)
½ C nonfat dry milk
¼ C dried cranberries or cherries
¼ C chopped walnuts
3 Tbs brown sugar
½ Tsp grnd cinnamon
1/8 Tsp salt
1 ¼ C water

Bring water to a boil.
Stir in mix, cover and let stand 10 minutes. (I usually split this up and eat 1-2 servings at a time, unless I have guests.)


SPANISH RICE

1 bag Instant rice
1/4th Diced Onion
2 Tbs Olive Oil
¼ C Dried Tomatoes
4C Water or Chicken stock

Soak dried tomatoes (5-10 minutes in the baggie you brought them in )
Heat oil in pan, add diced onions and cook ‘til translucent (maybe 2-3 minutes)
Add rice, stir until coated.
Add broth and tomatoes, bring to boil, cover and let simmer(Or in a cosy) ‘til done about 15 minutes.
YOU might have to scale this recipe down if you'e only carrying the Snowpeak pots. I carry an aluminum billy to boil my water.

CLAM CHOWDER

1 Pkg Knorr leek soup
1 can baby clams in olive oil
1/3 cup inst mashed potatoes
1 ½ cup water

In your pot, bring water and leek soup to a near boil
add
baby clams in olive oil - add all of the oil (worth the weight!)
stir in instant mashed potatoes

HOE CAKES
Ingredients:
1/2 Cup Cornmeal 3.5oz
1 cup hot water (more or less) 8.0oz
2 dashes butter flakes 0.2oz
1 dash salt 0.1oz
3 dashes powdered milk 0.3oz
camp spoon of olive oil 0.5oz
Total weight: 4.6oz dry 8.0 water
Calories: approximately 550-600
*note* all weights are approximate
Mix all ingredients in a bowl to a consistency that isn't runny but isn't a paste either (similar to pancake batter). Rub a light coat of oil on your frying pan, and then pour the batter into pancake sized cakes. Heat until brown, then flip and heat until brown on the other side. For a variety, try adding a packet of onion soup mix, taco seasoning, or beef stew flavoring. Make double recipe in the morning and have cornbread with breakfast and lunch.
This is a little elaborate and requires a small frypan or equal. and a simmer mode on your stove. I have a little aluminum dish/bowl that came with a Kmart messkit I've had around for 30+ years. That's all I've ever used it for.

FRY BREAD
1 cup flour (1/2 flour ½ bisquick)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
warm water (1/4 tbls pdr milk)
oil for frying 1/8th “ deep in pan. Enough to just float bread.
Mix dry ingredients then add water a little at a time ‘til you have a soft dough. Knead a few minutes, let rest for 15 min- half hour or more. Heat oil so sample drop cooks as soon as placed in pan. Then pinch off pieces, flatten to ¼” and fry 2 min/side. This is fry bread for two! You can double recipe. (see above for cooking)

Scout
2005-04-20, 15:26
Excellent suggestions...exactly what I was looking for in the begining!

Here is my snag - I am a picky person. Can't stand certain textures, tastes and so on. However, some of your recipies have sparked my interest so I will see how it works out.

Thanks.

Mutinousdoug
2005-04-20, 17:41
Scout,
Try going to "www.backpacking.net/forums/" and got to "light foods" and then "post trail food recipes here".
I think that's where I got some of mine.

"picky eater" eh?
There is nothing edible that garlic powder or pepper sauce won't make better.

Heh! You're funny.

jimtanker
2005-04-20, 19:13
I always have crushed red pepper with me.

Also, do a search for "zip loc bag recipies" you should get a few hits.

Chicago Dave
2005-04-24, 18:12
I've been experimenting with freezer bag meals the last month. I like this method, theres no clean up and you just pre-store the meals your going to cook in the freezer bags.

The Freezer Bag method is especially useful for mac & chesse since it usually burns my pot. All you do for these meals is bring your water to a rolling boil and then pour it in the bag. The trick to it is how long you let the bag sit, I found 12 minutes was good for mac and chesse to make sure the macaroni noodles are thoroughly cook, and only about 3 to 4 for minutes for Ramen based recipes.

Im also trying to get away from the Lipton noodles and trying to use the Ramen noodles for a base for most my meals since the Ramen noddles are fried in oil and have a higher fat content. To accomplish this I toss all the flavor packets that come with the Ramen noodles and use Knorr sauce mixes instead (Creamy Pesto a favorite of mine) there are many flavors. I also add either chicken, turkey or spam to these Ramen based meals.

Its hard to find spam and turkey in the foil packets all the time so i'll use the canned ones, the cans really don't add alot of weight (an ounce give or take).
I have an alloted 2 pounds of food a day and i'll include this ounce or so in that. By weighing my daily food provisions, it will save me alot of weight by being strict to the 2 pound guideline. For this reason i'm turning into a proponent of maildrops, since if your re-supplying in town stores, you can get carried away with the weight.

Mutinousdoug
2005-04-24, 22:43
:biggrin:
Also, "Fantastic" brand makes some good, instant stuff. See them at: "www.fantasticfoods.com" They'll be at your local grocer at or near the ethnic foods section. Refried beans; soups. I think it's all organic (whatever that is). Heat, cosy, spread on a pita and eat. Oh, and bring some salsa. It's not to spicey :bawling: .
I always thought Kraft Dinner was too messy to fix in the woods until there was: boilin'bags!

Scout
2005-04-26, 03:51
awesome. was wondering how to cook mac and cheese without actually putting the noodles in the pot - i have learned how to cook in my huge pot but I have downsized to a lighter size along with an ultra light ION STOVE!!!!

So now all these freezer bag ideas are going to get put to a good use!

tinny3
2005-05-02, 04:07
On my previous hikes I have survived on the following:

Breakfasts:
Cream of wheat
Dried Apricots
Breakfast bar

Lunch:
Hard salami (while it lasts)
Crackers
Soup

Dinner:
Mac-N-Cheese
or
Minute Rice and Stove Top Stuffing combo

Just bought some smaller pots (lighter too!) and am now looking for other ways to cook without having to boil my macaroni noodles (since my pot is much smaller).

Looking at backpacker meals...what do you think?

What other ideas do you suggest?

Stove top stuffing is good any time---Thanks for the idea i never thought about stuffing!!!! Try anything made by bear creek --it is easy to heat up and taste great. if you do the potato soup let the dried potato chunks soak for awhile before cooking everything. i sift them out and put them in a seperate bag with the dried corn and hamburger. cooks in about 3 minutes and taste great

Scout
2005-05-02, 05:15
Stove top stuffing

Stove top
Minute Rice
Chicken bullion

You really need the bullion to get the flavor right.

Another good option - add in a pack of chicken.

GregH
2005-05-02, 12:55
I've been preparing some of my meals at home, putting them into FoodSaver bags and sealing them, then into the freezer. Pack them when I'm ready to go. They stay fresh due to the vacuum seal and all I do is drop one into boiling water for a bit to heat it up.

tinny3
2005-05-02, 21:16
When you cook rice and stuffing do you add any butter or oil? I was thinking that stove top as made at home called for some oil or butter? If it is like most backpacking food you just leave that part out and it taste great anyway.

Scout
2005-05-02, 22:07
When you cook rice and stuffing do you add any butter or oil? I was thinking that stove top as made at home called for some oil or butter? If it is like most backpacking food you just leave that part out and it taste great anyway.

I just leave the oil/butter out. BUT I have learned (from this site) that people carry oil with them as a subsitute for butter...I will try that too!

Major Slacker
2005-05-03, 14:19
…commercial backpacker meals...an organic company that makes them...but I forget the company
http://trailfoods.com/