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View Full Version : Where to find powdered eggs?



GregH
2005-04-21, 22:30
I need some powdered eggs for use in a cornbread recipe for my Bakepacker. However, my local Albertson's doesn't appear to carry it. What type of stores would carry it (Wal-Mart, Sports Authority, Kroger)?

Thanks for the guidance.

Greg

fly.fast
2005-04-22, 00:01
Greg, I've found freeze dried eggs at my local outfitter as well as REI and Campmor.

Lanthar
2005-04-22, 10:04
I'm not sure where my mom used to get them, but discount grocery stores typically have them (Aldi's). Also, one of the most popular dried eggs are the governement food bank dried eggs.

bstwo
2005-04-23, 21:52
GregH,
For baking only, you can use one Heaping T of soy flour as a egg substiute. I have benn using this for about 5 years in my cake recipes in my bakepackers. You do realize that you don't need that fancy grid to steam food? I have some pictures of my steamers and my cake recipe on my web site, The steamers are under Stove and Cooking Acc.

http://webpages.charter.net/fam-strick/web/ (My Home Page)

Rosaleen
2005-04-25, 12:44
Greg-

I can sometimes find cans of dried egg white or dried whole eggs in the baking section of a grocery store. As far as adding to a baking mix on the trail, though, have you tried using the mix WITHOUT the eggs? I've steamed muffins, etc., using an off the shelf cheap mix and water many times. No egg or oil, just water and the mix. Keep it simple!

Rosaleen

Lanthar
2005-04-25, 15:28
Rosaleen,

You're post got me thinking... my favorite brownie mix in the world is from Aldi's, and the best way to make it is the no-egg option... I'm thinking I may have a new way of making personal deserts... :biggrin:

Thanks!

GregH
2005-04-25, 15:33
Thanks everyone for the info.
Rosaleen:
I'm new to the bakepacking "genre" and so have not tried any recipes without using the egg.
This weekend I was hiking/camping on the Ouachita Trail in Oklahoma and successfully baked blueberry muffins, cheese biscuits, and pancakes (all from no-egg recipes) on my MSR Whisperlite. I'll try some of the recipes I've seen which call for egg without the egg. Thanks for the tip.

bstwo:
I'll also try using soy flour - which I've seen everywhere - as an egg substitute and compare the difference to not using egg at all. And I'm heading over to your website in a minute.

GregH
2005-04-25, 15:47
Bruce (bstwo),

I jumped to your site: very nice. I especially like the mousetrap!

With regards to your steamers: how did you get the middle holes punched? Does the punch displayed on your site go in that deep?
The bakepacker guys (Strike 2 Industries) say their heat exchanger/heat pipe system is faster and more efficient than steaming. I'm wondering how hard would it be to fashion a collapsable grid that would fit inside my pot?

bstwo
2005-04-25, 16:11
GregH,

I punched all the holes with the Whitney Punch, yes you can reach them all.

The BackPacker grid may be more efficient, but all you really need is a bag support. I have been using a larger model that fits a 10" stock pot for about five years and it works great. No grid, just holes. So what if it is 5% slower, you can custom fit a steamer to fit you cook set, and always have it with you. Do you know how good chocolate cake smells on the trail? You could almost trade it for sex!

Try it, you will like it!

SGT Rock
2005-04-25, 16:15
How big a hole can that Whitney punch make? How much do they cost? And, where do I get one?

Rosaleen
2005-04-25, 16:16
Lanthar-

You are welcome---A point about brownies. They do not usually do well with cooking by steaming. Too much fat, IIRC.

This could be the one area that only an Outback can do for baking: regular brownies. I've read of substitutes that call for melting chocolate and stirring in graham cracker crumbs. My chocolate would be eaten before the crumbs could be crushed.....

R

bstwo
2005-04-25, 17:01
SGT Rock,

The Whitney Punch comes with punches and dies from 3/32-9/32" or the metric equivalent. the real WP will set you back about $70, or you can buy a nock off at Harbor Freight for $17, you do the math. Several other internet clan have bought the one from HF and been happy with it. I looked at one, and would buy it, but I already have several.

Rosaleen,

The directions on the BackPacker say NO FUDGE. Yep, must be the fat, but I have use Chocolate fudge cake mixes before, you just have to boil them longer, or have a gooier center, but who cares about a little goo.

GregH
2005-04-25, 17:19
I have Jean Spangenberg's "Bakepacker's Companion Cook Book" and she says it's the extra shortening that causes the interminable bake times for standard chocolate mixes.

bstwo
2005-04-25, 17:43
I also have the Companion book, lots of info and recipes.

GregH
2005-04-25, 18:01
I also have the Companion book, lots of info and recipes.

I baked her Cheese Biscuits on the trail this weekend. They were great.

Lanthar
2005-04-26, 18:54
The directions on the BackPacker say NO FUDGE. Yep, must be the fat, but I have use Chocolate fudge cake mixes before, you just have to boil them longer, or have a gooier center, but who cares about a little goo.

exactly, that's why the no-eg version is better... less cakey more gooey

a7u
2005-05-24, 23:03
One time I accidentally added a little too much water while re-hydrating powdered eggs. I tasted the soupy mess and realized, hey, it isn't too bad. Eggy hot water. So I pulled out a packet of dried soup mix & stirred it in. Since then I have used powdered eggs in the proper way but have added them to soups with great results. Good taste, good nutrition.

Lanthar
2005-05-25, 14:56
One time I accidentally added a little too much water while re-hydrating powdered eggs. I tasted the soupy mess and realized, hey, it isn't too bad. Eggy hot water. So I pulled out a packet of dried soup mix & stirred it in. Since then I have used powdered eggs in the proper way but have added them to soups with great results. Good taste, good nutrition.

That's not too bad of an idea