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village idiot
2005-05-06, 15:53
I am thru hiking the AT this season beginning on May 8th. I have always hiked without a stove, but never for so long of a trip before. I do not mind eating the same thing day in and day out and in winter have never felt the need to have hot drinks.
I just take foods that do not need to be rehydrated or cooked(i.e., poptarts, granola bars, beef jerky, string cheese, pretzels, crackers, cheese spreads, tuna fish in the resealable packets, pepperoni, gorp, little debbie stuff, matza and/or pitas, etc...).
I was just wondering what others thought about this and wether or not anyone else on this forum does this as well? Or am I just a crazed idiot? If any of you share this method any suggestions would be appreciated!!!

-The Village Idiot=nanoo, nanoo, nanoo to you too, and hydi ho, good day, good bye, and thanks a million maniacs!! See ya on the trail!!!

SGT Rock
2005-05-06, 17:29
I hear people have done it. I prefer hot food myself and I think it may be something you want if you are out for a while in cold weather on a long distance hike.

Just Jeff
2005-05-06, 22:45
I think it would get old on a long distance hike, but if you're ok with that go for it.

I'd make sure I knew how to build a fire in the rain and snow before I left the stove at home, though. A bottle of hot water in your bag could literally save your life in an unexpected storm. Building a good fire would be just as good...as long as you're comfortable with your abilities when it counts.

My .02, anyway...worth what you paid for it. :)

Rage in a Cage
2005-05-07, 00:05
It can be done but I would not want to go for extended periods without a warm meal. I have found that a hot meal can go a long way toward improving my mental status when I am hiking in cool, rainy weather. I would at the very least carry a soda can stove and a pack or two of ramen to help fight off the rainy weather blahs.
You are a better judge of what you can live with than I am so plan carefully and good luck. :)

GregH
2005-05-08, 16:13
It can be done but I would not want to go for extended periods without a warm meal. ...

It's hot coffee for me. Sitting in the forest listening to the quiet while my hands are cupped around a mug of good coffee...ahhhh, priceless.

deadeye
2005-05-08, 21:51
Hot or cold is an entirely personal choice, although I like my coffee, too. I'd be more concerned with the quality of the food - most of what you have listed fits best in the category of "junk food." You're about to go on a 4 to 7 month journey, placing high demands on your body, and giving it very low octane fuel to accomplish the task.

GregH
2005-05-09, 17:13
...You're about to go on a 4 to 7 month journey, placing high demands on your body, and giving it very low octane fuel to accomplish the task.

It's the latest weight loss plan: The AT Diet!

tinny3
2005-05-11, 20:36
If you do a study on no stove versus stove you will find that it is actually heavier to go without a stove because everything you eat still has the water in it. a very big dehydrated meal weighs about 5 oz and is a nice touch. it takes a mere 3/4 oz of fuel to cook it for a total of 5-3/4 oz. if you eat a couple powerbars and some gorp you are at the same weight and it is not nearly as satisfying as a hot meal. stuff like tuna in a bag is even heavier. it is pretty hard to beat a good hot meal. Also you can boil water in a pinch.

kentucky
2005-05-19, 10:22
well u can make without a stove its not hard theres just as much or more carbs and protien in food thats not cooked, i like my stove because i like my coffee,and also there are alot of areas that wont let you start a camp fire,my recomendation is bring one,hot soup is nice hot coffee I dont hike in the rain much any more so usuallys i hold out unless i have to and remember on them rainy days somthing hot helps the mental part atleast for me :captain: ky

GregH
2005-05-21, 19:28
well u can make without a stove its not hard theres just as much or more carbs and protien in food thats not cooked, i like my stove because i like my coffee,and also there are alot of areas that wont let you start a camp fire,my recomendation is bring one,hot soup is nice hot coffee I dont hike in the rain much any more so usuallys i hold out unless i have to and remember on them rainy days somthing hot helps the mental part atleast for me :captain: ky

For goodness' sake, man, use that period key! :rolleyes:

Icemanat95
2005-05-22, 19:15
There is very little in the world that picks you up better, after your third or fourth straight day of hiking in the rain, than a hot meal and some hot drinks to finish out the day. I cannot even imagine giving that up. Sure I'm willing to delay my gratification a bit to save weight on stove and fuel, but not to do away with warm stuff altogether. It is also a basic safety issue as well. The ability to generate some significant heat without having to fuss around with building a fire, is a major assett should you or someone else get hurt or sick.

gungadin
2005-05-24, 18:43
While I have gone without warm food and drink for several days, it would definitely be impressive to leave it behind for months. That will probably call for even more personal reflection, but the benefit of simplicity is great. If you can leave it behind, I say go for it. It would be very commendable. I would bring a stove and food you can warm unless you are 100% sure. Maybe try it out with a week or two trip to see how it goes and then make up your mind.

Pappyhighlife
2005-05-26, 14:35
You folks got me thinking, I remember camping with my Dad back in the late 50's I was just a chap of course. But reading your posts I remembered we never carried a stove. One summer we hunted camped, and hiked in the Ozarks from mid June to July. For a coffee break my Pop would build a small fire and use his old fashion coffee pot to brew a cup or two for himself.
All the meals were like that. When it rained he made me carry an empty old Chock full of Nuts coffee can with holes punched in the top. With a large hole cut in the side. (Hobo stove)
He would put up our tarp get the fire going and cook the critter De-jour for the day in a pan on top of the can.He cooked everything in a big ass black frying pan from bacon to bannock.
He build my pack frame and Mom sewed an old mail bag in it. She also re-supplied us every so often.
Thanks for the stroll down memory lane.
Good hiking, Pappy.

Icemanat95
2005-05-26, 16:53
You folks got me thinking, I remember camping with my Dad back in the late 50's I was just a chap of course. But reading your posts I remembered we never carried a stove. One summer we hunted camped, and hiked in the Ozarks from mid June to July. For a coffee break my Pop would build a small fire and use his old fashion coffee pot to brew a cup or two for himself.
All the meals were like that. When it rained he made me carry an empty old Chock full of Nuts coffee can with holes punched in the top. With a large hole cut in the side. (Hobo stove)
He would put up our tarp get the fire going and cook the critter De-jour for the day in a pan on top of the can.He cooked everything in a big ass black frying pan from bacon to bannock.
He build my pack frame and Mom sewed an old mail bag in it. She also re-supplied us every so often.
Thanks for the stroll down memory lane.
Good hiking, Pappy.

The modern version of Pappy's Dad's method is the Zip Stove. And there is nothing wrong with either of those methods, but they do require extra time and in the case of a fire, it is definitely not a low-impact method.

That said, has anyone out there tried hiking with a Kelly Kettle. (http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?lGen=detail&itemID=106256&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCat=10107&iSubCat=10111&iProductID=106256)

JAK
2005-09-12, 00:39
Do a search on this sight for Kelly Kettle.
PKH and myself both use them.
Someone around here even made their own.

donredondo
2005-09-13, 15:41
what? here?............

http://www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor/kelly-kettle.htm


as an aside on the BBC in the UK we have a bushcraft guy called Ray Mears who makes popular progs looking at how indigenous people live off the land in harmony and without depleting it's resources...... there are some wonderful wilderness tips he has......

one of which is ... if you are in an area with a lot of pine, a stove can be made from a chunk of tree.... find a 2' length, split it into 4 with your handy hatchet and wedges. bury 6" or so in a cleared area, withit standing up and with 1/2" or so between the quarters. stuff birch bark, dry twigs etc in the gap and light them up. the resinous wood will catch and you have a stove. place billy/kettle on top.....


if you can get PS channels over there or BBc America.... keep an eye open for Ray Mears...good stuff.

Seeker
2005-09-13, 17:41
don,

think i've seen it... "Ray Mears Outdoors"... pretty good show as i recall... (then there's the guy who runs around barefoot, chasing snakes... don't think it's the same guy... he's crazy... good, and funny, but crazy...)

to answer the original post, i never go without a stove of some sort... i'm almost reptilian in my inability to move before the sun is up and warm, and i have to have something warm to drink in the mornings, even in the summer... alky stove is my favorite, in that it weighs little and is completely reliable...

PKH
2005-09-13, 18:11
Yup - Kelly Kettle - fine piece of kit.

PKH

dougmeredith
2005-09-13, 20:44
He also has a fairly interesting book that I picked up a year or two ago. Warning: if you are looking for LNT, this book isn't for you.

Doug

KLeth
2005-09-14, 02:00
On our hike this year I did a lot of experimenting on the making of camp fires.
As you probably know; you can get a small cooking fire going, using nothing but 2-3 rocks or 2 big branches, a handfull of birch bark and some twigs - If there are no stones nor branches a cooking-trench works well.
Even fresh birch burns nicely - But normally there is no need for burning fresh birch and it doesn't comply with "Leave no trace".
Dry "cotton grass" (guess you could use ripped up "red mase" as well) mixed with moss litter or birch bark dust is great for catching sparks from flint and steel.

The first fires I made, before looking into how to do it right, were not very good - Too large, wouldn't catch fire or too small to get going .
Now I'm a lot better at making fires for cooking - But still I can get better . . . .

Anybody have expiriences in making something like mayasticks and mayadust ? I know the cottonball/vaseline trick!