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Billc
2005-05-12, 15:21
I just purchased a Hennessey Hammock. I am not planning on using a sleeping bag. What do you fellow hammock users use for bedding and how do you control moisture seeping in through the bottom of the hammock?

peter_pan
2005-05-12, 17:17
moisture does not seep in thru the bottom of a hammock...cold does....condesation begins with the air and you, the heat and evapoization source....get rid of the non breathable " solutions": space blankets, closed cell pad, etc. Use quilts and under quilts and only breathable shielding materials...But then I'm biased.

Welcome to the hanging crowd.

Pan

txulrich
2005-05-13, 09:35
moisture does not seep in thru the bottom of a hammock...cold does....condesation begins with the air and you, the heat and evapoization source....get rid of the non breathable " solutions": space blankets, closed cell pad, etc. Use quilts and under quilts and only breathable shielding materials...But then I'm biased.

Welcome to the hanging crowd.

Pan

I'm not biased and I agree. My quilt arrived yesterday and I get to test it tomorrow. The Scout troop is going to Beavers Bend, OK for a canoe trip. I still haven't replaced my sleeping bag with a quilt (I'll use it that way) but that will happen in the future.

youngblood
2005-05-13, 10:08
Hammock sleeping gear & moisture control

I just purchased a Hennessey Hammock. I am not planning on using a sleeping bag. What do you fellow hammock users use for bedding and how do you control moisture seeping in through the bottom of the hammock?

Like Pan said, moisture doesn't seep into the bottom of the hammock... you should be hanging high and dry above the wet ground. The moisture you are refering to is from perspiration and you may not even sense the perspiration. Basically you emit moisture from your skin in the form of a warm high humidity vapor and it condenses when it reaches an object that is cool enough for this vapor to reach its 'dew point' or a barrier that will not let the vapor pass through.

The best ways to handle it can vary with different weather conditions and individual preferences. If you are using breathable insulation, most or maybe even all of it will harmlessly pass through the insulation. If you aren't using breathable insulation and are not purposely trying to gain the extra warmth of wearing a vapor barrier of some type, then you need to do something to minimize this phenomenon. Basically there are four things that come to mind. First is to turn from time to time when/if you wake up during the night to give the vapor/moisture a chance to harmlessly dissipate into the surrounding air. Second, if you are using a nonbreathable pad for insulation is to cover it with a quick drying wicking material. Third is to not use so much insulation on top of you that you are sweating. And fourth is to pitch your rainfly so that you get ventilation that is appropriate for the weather conditions you are in. This vapor type perspiration is going on, whether you sense it or not, and somehow you need to dissipate it into the surrounding air. If it is a windy night you can pitch your rainfly more constrictively to block some of the wind, but if you pitch your rainfly constrictively on a warm humid calm night, you will make it difficult to get the ventilation you need to dissipate the perspiration. Even bugnetting can contribute to condensation of perspiration.

Youngblood

Pappyhighlife
2005-05-13, 15:48
During the summer months I use my Military poncho with a poncho liner tied in. It's lighter than my sleeping bag and most nights I have to peel it off because it gets so hot sleeping.
I suppose it works so well because the quilt is soft and the liner must act like a space blanket sealing in the heat and acting like an insulator. It also makes a great seat cushion in camp, even on damp ground because of the poncho itself. When I was in the service we never wore the poncho much because it made you sweat so much, you got just as wet wearing it, as you would standing in the summer rain.
Never had a problem with condensation in the HH. I also found that this system is not worth squat in the HH when the temp falls below 50
But that's another thread. <<..>>

Billc
2005-05-16, 00:30
Thanks fellas for the information about mosture control in a HH. I am new to backpacking and trying to learn as much as I can before making a lot of mistakes. In fact my HH has not arrived yet and I have not even been on a backpacking trip. I think I made one mistake on the second item purchased. I bought a Osprey Aether 75. It was on sale at a local store in Columbia, SC and seemed to fit well. That was before I read a number of articles on ultralight packing. I bought a Primus 1 liter hard anodized pot w/ lid and think I will like it a lot. Read a thread on the Atlanta alcohol stove and made one out of a potted meat can this afternoon.

What do I need to keep warm in the HH that I can make or adapt to stay warm, without mortgaging the house for?

Just Jeff
2005-05-16, 01:12
What do I need to keep warm in the HH that I can make or adapt to stay warm, without mortgaging the house for?

See http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/HammockCamping.html

Risk, Sgt Rock, Ed Speer and JRB are pretty much the recognized experts on staying warm in hammocks...check out their pages!
http://www.imrisk.com
http://hikinghq.net/hammock/hammock.html
http://www.speerhammocks.com/Tips/Tips%20on%20hammock%20camping.htm
http://www.jacksrbetter.com

And I haven't added this to my page yet, but I will soon:
http://www.paysheet.com/underfly/underfly.htm
It uses the stock fly as an undercover to block the wind and hold insulation. Since many folks will recommend you get a larger fly anyway (I like the JRB 8x8), this will be a good use for the one that comes with your hammock.