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Billc
2005-05-21, 02:30
I need to purchase some rainware. I have pants but need to purchase a jacket or poncho and hat. What do you people like to use that is not expensive?

AddyB
2005-05-21, 03:07
Helly Hansen "Impertech" rainwear isn't grossly expensive, and it's very durable, although it doesn't look or feel like it is. It's a very stretchy PU material, backed with a mesh-like fabric. http://www.hhworkwear.com

Cheers,

Adam

peter_pan
2005-05-21, 08:36
DriDucks....$ 29.99, top and botton....breathable....durable enough for the AT if treated gently ( no bushwacking).

Sgt.Krohn
2005-05-21, 16:03
my packable rainsuit is from RedLedge. I have the Thunderlight parka and the pants with the full zips. The parka has underarm zip vents and front zip vents. Both the parka and the pants are a single breathable waterproof fabric.
I've had them about 5 years and they have really held up well and I've never soaked through.

here's a link to what they look like on the Campmor website

RedLedge Thunderlight parka (http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=3192609&memberId=12500226&storeId=226)

http://www.campmor.com/images/cloth/larger/30321_l.jpg

RedLedge full zip rain pants (http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=3192620&memberId=12500226)

http://www.campmor.com/images/cloth/larger/30322_l.jpg

My favorite rain gear though is still my military poncho. I use it all the time and lived in it for almost 6 months back in 1970 on the other side of the world...
It's pretty hard to beat a military poncho and a poncho liner !!....

http://pic12.picturetrail.com/VOL433/1045515/5481091/97435942.jpg

Billc
2005-05-21, 23:11
Sgt. Krohn,
Thanks for the information, I have read some reviews on the Red Ledge rain gear. All have been good. It is even better for someone on the form to respond as a user of the gear. I aapreciate you help. Incidently, do you use the military issue poncho when backpacking?
Billc :)

Sgt.Krohn
2005-05-22, 02:20
Sgt. Krohn, Incidentally, do you use the military issue poncho when backpacking?
Billc :)
Bill- Once you've been a grunt and your whole shelter is your poncho & your poncho liner you never hit the trail without them. I've never seen a non-military poncho built out of as quality of materials as the military ponchos are. they are heavier than any other poncho out there but they are meant to be tough enough to fight in.
I still sleep under a poncho liner on just cool nights. My wife teases me and calls it my "blanky" :rolleyes:

In Nam we carried a jungle hammock and used it when we could. Your poncho was your rainfly.

http://pic12.picturetrail.com/VOL433/1045515/5481091/92667319.jpg

SGT Rock
2005-05-22, 10:43
LOL, when I was in the 2nd Cav, the nickname for the poncho liner was the "woobee" because it was our security blanket. The joke was also "Without my blanket I woobee cold"

Billc
2005-05-22, 16:30
Sgt. Krohn,
I didn't make it to Nam. Found it difficult to stay alert in class some afternoons at Signal school, Fort Gordon. This was back in August of 62, in barrick type buildings w/ window exhaust fans. Failed one test by 3 points. Phased back into the next class. Later, I was glad that I was phased back. 13 of my former class buddies upon graduation were assigned to the 1st Air Assault Division, Fort Benning. They were promoted to serve as gunners and Airbore medics on those H. choppers when the 1st Air Assault Div. landed in Nam.

I think I will pick up a surplus poncho next time I'm in Augusta, Ga. I remember staying dry when I used to wear one.

Thanks for the pics. and information.

Billc

txulrich
2005-05-22, 17:12
[QUOTE=Sgt.Krohn]my packable rainsuit is from RedLedge. I have the Thunderlight parka and the pants with the full zips. The parka has underarm zip vents and front zip vents. Both the parka and the pants are a single breathable waterproof fabric.
I've had them about 5 years and they have really held up well and I've never soaked through.[QUOTE]

I also have the RedLedge set. I use it for both work and the weekends. What's really nice (besides being really light) is that it stuffs into its own pocket.

Nomad
2005-05-23, 03:12
I've had Marmot and some North face but the Redledge is best for the money. Eventually backpack straps will wear thru the fabric.

Its ALL about ventilation IMO!! Whatever you get make sure it is full of angeled zippers.
To he!! with goretex only. I'm about done with that stuff. It breathes as well as I can fly. I would say the poncho is A#1 but three trips with tornadoes and vicious winds turned mine into a scarf up around my ears.

I will say that a poncho (humpback desgned for packing) and gaiters is the coolest way to warm weather hike aside from just strapping an umbrella to the side of you pack (which I've done. Its awesome in light weather and intense sun on wide open trail)

SGT Rock
2005-05-23, 08:18
That is a good reason to get a Packa. The straps are inside the jacket so it cannot wear through and it has ventilation similar to a poncho with the form fit benefits of a jacket.

Billc
2005-05-24, 00:24
Hello Sgt. Rock,

I'm not familiar with a "packa." Where do I find info. on a packa, and is it expensive?

Rage in a Cage
2005-05-24, 00:38
http://www.thepacka.com/

PKH
2005-05-24, 08:41
For Sarge (Rock)

I wonder if you have personal experience with the Packa. A number of reviews make this interesting piece of kit look pretty good. One concern I have is whether or not the Packa can be usefully worn without the pack. I'd rather not have to carry a separate rain jacket or shell when just farting around the campsite, or in the worse case situation, making or breaking camp in a cold heavy rain. This is very much on my mind as I endured just these conditions this last weekend. But overall it looks nice - I'm tempted.

Cheers,

PKH

SGT Rock
2005-05-24, 09:00
For Sarge (Rock)

I wonder if you have personal experience with the Packa. A number of reviews make this interesting piece of kit look pretty good. One concern I have is whether or not the Packa can be usefully worn without the pack. I'd rather not have to carry a separate rain jacket or shell when just farting around the campsite, or in the worse case situation, making or breaking camp in a cold heavy rain. This is very much on my mind as I endured just these conditions this last weekend. But overall it looks nice - I'm tempted.

Cheers,

PKH


Yep, I have one. First - Cedar Tree is a great guy. Supports the military and is a down to earth southern boy. Last time I talked to him he was looking for a place around Western NC to move to from Georgia - and he has a new wife who seems very nice.

I had the same concern about the Packa, it actually took me a couple of trips to get sold on the idea myself. It can be a hassle if there is pouring rain while you are trying to get set up if you don't have a plan ahead of time. But, you can wear the packa without the pack on, you just have a big hump of extra material on your back.

I found I could get my pack off inside the packa and let it come out the bottom. Everything inside my pack is inside liners, and my tarp is on the outside of my pack where it is easy to get too. So I could drop my pack and get the tarp over it in nothing flat. Then get my shelter set up over the pack. It did get a little wet, but nothing bad. The key is to have the draw-cord loose around the pack before you try this.

PKH
2005-05-24, 09:14
Thank's Sarge - I think I'll end up giving this a try.

Cheers,

PKH

Rosaleen
2005-05-24, 14:05
Sarge-

Do you like the Packa better than your poncho? We've briefly discussed using a poncho/tarp over a Hennessy and skipping the stock fly, especially for long trips. Too bad I didn't get to show you the setup I'm using for experiments while at Trail Days.

Rosaleen

Nomad
2005-05-24, 14:53
Thanx for the link and heads-up!! I saw a pack once with an integrated rain-jacket but this is waaaay better. In fact I have mistook the Packa for that other product

This piece if gear should resolve alot of issues. Plus I expend alot of energy donning and removing my jacket inbetween downpours because the pack has too come off.

Not to mention I now waterproof my contents and skip the packcover. It always seems to get just as soaked as with it on somehow. This has never ceased to infuriate me. I can't seem to overcome the issue. I've had to put drain grommets in the bottom of a couple packs. From the factory my Gregory can hold about 1.5" of water in the bottom quite nicely. A wet pack can gain...what? ...1-4lbs?... of water weight overall when wet?

I'll definately be researching this harder. Great concept I was unaware of.

I know it sez they'll accomadate smaller packs like ours. I'll need that. The only issue I see is body sizing. My wife needs one of these but shes small. 5'6" 105lbs. I think I'll try it out anyway as soon as I burn holes thru my current gear

Sgt.Krohn
2005-05-24, 19:29
Sarge- Do you like the Packa better than your poncho? We've briefly discussed using a poncho/tarp over a Hennessy and skipping the stock fly, especially for long trips. Too bad I didn't get to show you the setup I'm using for experiments while at Trail Days. - Rosaleen

Rosaleen - If you meant me ?? I don't have the Packa. I'm just learning about it from this post as well. Brilliant idea.

When I bought my Hennessy over 5 years ago Tom's rainfly was too small for the hammock. I had rain blow into the hammock a couple of times until I made some modifications.

this is a thread that shows how I modified my Hennessy.
http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1200

I really liked adding the pole to the fly because it eliminated the tie-out lines from the side of the hammock and lets the hammock swing like a normal hammock. I also really liked using the plastic drop cloth for a storm fly because you can see through it and it lets light in. You can also make it any size you want. With it staked out over the hammock it makes a great area to get out of the weather on a rainy day.

Yes- it would be easy to use an Army ponch as a rainfly for a Hennessy. Just tie a string around the base of the hood and tie off the opposing corners over the hammock like the stock rainfly and stake out the other opposing corners. That's how we did it in Nam.

PKH
2005-05-24, 19:45
Rosaleen,

After a number of fly experiments with my Hennessy (fitted fly plus 5 x 8 tarp; fitted fly plus ID silnylon poncho; just the fitted fly), I finally settled on an 8 x 10 sillnylon tarp. The other combinations can work of course, as can the supplied fly, but it is a finicky set up, and sooner or later you will make a mistake or get lazy or careless, and you'll have a wet night. The single 8 x 10 tarp should make for a bomb proof covering that will provide loads of room for a cooking shelter and dry place to sit on those inevitable horrible days. Tie the tarp to the tree, not the hammock ridge line, and that sag problem will be eliminated as well.

Cheers,

PKH

SGT Rock
2005-05-24, 20:33
Sarge-

Do you like the Packa better than your poncho? We've briefly discussed using a poncho/tarp over a Hennessy and skipping the stock fly, especially for long trips. Too bad I didn't get to show you the setup I'm using for experiments while at Trail Days.

Rosaleen


If I remember our conversation right I decided not to go with a sil-nylon poncho/tarp for the Hennessy because I had some experiences with wait-a-minute vines and decided the risk of getting a slight puncture in my hammock rain fly by having it double as my rain gear was not an acceptable option. I've been using my Packa for over a year now and I'm very hapy with it. I personally would tighten it up a bit in a couple of places because it does "feel" like a poncho at times, but it works great and I'll just get use to it.

Billc
2005-05-28, 00:20
Hello Sgt. Rock,

I'm not familiar with a "packa." Where do I find info. on a packa, and is it expensive?

Sgt. Rock,

Thanks for the info. on the "Packa." Sorry I have been late getting back to you, but I have been busy. I plan to purchase one in the near future.

Bill :turtle:

Billc
2005-05-28, 00:23
http://www.thepacka.com/

Rage In A Cage,

Thanks for the web site on the "Packa." I will purchase one in the near future.

Bill :turtle:

Billc
2005-05-28, 00:38
I need to purchase some rainware. I have pants but need to purchase a jacket or poncho and hat. What do you people like to use that is not expensive?

Fellas, This is a great site! One other item I need some help on it a hat to wear when hiking that would also be good in the rain? What do you fellas like to wear?

Bill

Hog On Ice
2005-05-28, 09:15
I almost always wear a western style straw hat - not waterproof but it does keep the water from dripping down my neck and out of my face. About the only other hat I wear is a blaze orange boonie hat during hunting season.

GregH
2005-05-29, 14:11
Tilley T-3. It's a very breathable cotton and when it rains the brim gets stiff and keeps the rain from going down your back. It's not lightweight but it's bombproof. I've been using mine for 10 years.

Lanthar
2005-05-29, 15:28
since we're talking about raingear, I've been thinking about trying one of these (http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/product.asp?catalog%5Fname=USPlastic&category%5Fname=21931&product%5Fid=21968) this summer. Should be fairly resistant and almost bombproof.

I wouldn't use it if it's gonna be really cold, as it only snaps in the front, but during the summer it might work well.

KLeth
2005-05-30, 04:14
I use serveral combinations.

My clothes are waxed, to make it both windproof and water-repellent.
I wax trousers (http://www.fjallraven.se/spring2005/en/85780.htm) and jacket (http://www.fjallraven.se/spring2005/en/81420.htm). Waxing also helps repell dirt :biggrin:
But in hot weather waxed clothes are not as pleasant as not waxed, so I choose my clothes from the typical weatherconditions in the area I'm hiking through.
I sweat a lot and the waxed clothes are a lot more breathable than goretex but when expecting really wet weather I select my goretex jacket and if it really rains I also use a pair of normal and cheap raintrousers - But then it really pours down.

Sometimes I've brought my lightweight army poncho that doubles as tarp, shelter, windbarrier and raingear.

Most of my hiking clothes are made of G1000(TM) fabric.
http://www.fjallraven.se/en/g1000/
Waxing guide:
http://www.fjallraven.se/en/g1000/vaxguide.htm