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blackdog
2005-06-02, 12:12
I'm waiting for a pleated shoulder ring sling baby carrier. It's being sewn right now by a company working a lot like MoonbowGear but for babygear here in Sweden. The design is simple, but I wanted the knowhow of a sling sewing professional to compare with.

Then the thread about the LAB pack (or rather the shoulder straps) got me thinking. Some of the ideas that are used in ring slings could be used for outdoor stuff too. Pleated shoulder straps like in a ring sling might distribute pressure better than regular straps. The idea hasn't been tried yet, afaik. Maybe a mesh could be used to allow for better breathability, even?

Bold DIYers out there might find food for thought at Jan Andrea's site:
http://www.sleepingbaby.net/jan/index.html?Baby/crafts.html

The X-ring type of sling found at Jan's site might be used as it is for carrying stuffsacks as well as babies. And the normal attention to detail of the outdoor people might evolve the sling designs even further, who knows? Maybe some emergency gear like whistles could be hooked onto the rings?

Anyway... The slings themselves are simple DIY projects for new parents or grandparents used to carry stuff around as most hikers are. You certainly don't have to be a sling professional to sew one. In fact, in most parts of the world the women carry all their stuff around (including children) in a multi-use piece of fabric that is simply wrapped, folded or tied.

So the multipurpose solution of slings might even benefit the hiking world? I certainly hope so.

Just Jeff
2005-06-02, 12:55
That's interesting. And it would be much easier to get at ALL of your gear while walking. If you could get comfortable with two slings, one over each hip, it seems like it would keep the weight more balanced near your center of gravity than a backpack. And it would also provide arm rests for those who don't use trekking poles. It might be tough to use with trekking poles, though.

Using DWR, you could find a way to make a hammock sock or some sort of windblock to make it a multi-use item. I guess you could use sil and make a modified tarp, but I wouldn't want a non-breathable material on my body like that.

Might even want velcro along the inner and outer rails.

Hrm...I've been thinking about what kind of backpack to make. I might have to try a pair of slings, instead!

blackdog
2005-06-02, 15:09
Hrm...I've been thinking about what kind of backpack to make. I might have to try a pair of slings, instead!
Have a look at the X-ring-sling (Jan calls it a ringwrap):
http://www.sleepingbaby.net/jan/index.html?Baby/wrap.html
It's basically the two-slings-in-one that you're looking for.

Just Jeff
2005-06-02, 16:20
X-ring looks ok. Sure seems to cover up a lot of the body, though...not sure how good it would be in hot weather. I'll play with it when I get done with the move.

robanna
2005-06-07, 15:55
I stumbled across slings a while back when looking for a baby carrier (we've got a 4 month old hiker in training) and descided to make some. I made a few ring sling and a Wrap-Around type (http://www.peppermint.com/girasolcarry.htm) .

As I was making them I thought how similar it was to my hammock.
Well, since then I have taken a few day-hikes with my hammock as a sling.

I no longer use a back when i'm ultralight hiking. I form a tube out of my pad by wraping it tight aroung my sleeping bag and filling it with everything else and the put the tube into the hammock/sling. :biggrin:

Oh, and the sling for a babies is the way to go. The fabric spreads the weight so no hotspots. And he gets into it and falls right asleep. I can go for miles with him like that.

Just Jeff
2005-06-07, 22:25
I no longer use a back when i'm ultralight hiking. I form a tube out of my pad by wraping it tight aroung my sleeping bag and filling it with everything else and the put the tube into the hammock/sling. :biggrin:

That's AWESOME!! About how much weight/bulk are you comfortable with using that setup? How many days' hiking can you do with that?

Do you worry about the hammock getting wet while hiking, then having a wet bed?

I guess the two-layer hammock would make this even easier.

robanna
2005-06-08, 12:22
Well, my pack weight is only around 9 pounds. Anything under 15 pounds is comfy enough for for 3-4 hours before a rest.

I'm not any more worried about a wet hammock than I am a wet pack that would soak my clothes, etc. That's why I carry a poncho/tarp. I live and hike mostly in the Rockies and the rains predictible and don't last very long (unlike NY where I moved here from. Man, I can rain for days non-stop there).

I never thought about using the rings to make adjustments easier. I currently use a knot like the sliding knot (http://www.nandu.hu/English/Practical/babycarrier.htm) on the bottom of this page (just a bowline really).

I've thought about a double bottom hammock that could somehow (this is the part I haven't worked out yet) be opened up lengthwise so I would have enough fabric to do the wrap cross back carry (http://www.peppermint.com/wrapcrossbackcarry.htm) .

blackdog
2005-06-08, 13:14
I've thought about a double bottom hammock that could somehow (this is the part I haven't worked out yet) be opened up lengthwise so I would have enough fabric to do the wrap cross back carry (http://www.peppermint.com/wrapcrossbackcarry.htm) .
Do you think something like Jan Andrea's Convertible Ring Wrap (http://www.sleepingbaby.net/jan/index.html?Baby/wrap2.html) could work for your hammock wrap idea?

robanna
2005-06-08, 13:27
It might but I'm 6'2" so I'd need at least 6 yards. That's still twice as long as my current hammock.

Just Jeff
2005-06-08, 15:39
I live and hike mostly in the Rockies and the rains predictible and don't last very long.

What part? I'll be living in Colorado Springs in ~2 years.


I've thought about a double bottom hammock that could somehow (this is the part I haven't worked out yet) be opened up lengthwise so I would have enough fabric to do the wrap cross back carry (http://www.peppermint.com/wrapcrossbackcarry.htm) .

I think the Crazy Crib opens lengthwise. Just sew it around three edges and tie like a normal Speer.

robanna
2005-06-08, 15:47
I'm in Arvada.

By lengthwise, I mean sewn on one end so that a ~9' hammock would open to be ~18' long because that's how much length is needed to to do a cross-carry wrap.

Or, my other thought it that it splits like a HH. each side of the split goes over your shoulders, cross in the front, around your back and ties in the front. The part that doesn't split could have a pocket (double layer) to put gear into. I don't know.

Just Jeff
2005-06-08, 21:17
By lengthwise, I mean sewn on one end so that a ~9' hammock would open to be ~18' long because that's how much length is needed to to do a cross-carry wrap.

Ah....got it. You could have one piece of material 18' long. Tie an overhand knot into each end. To hang it as a hammock, fold it in half and run a webbing support through the fold to take care of one end. For the other end, put the knots together and wrap this kind of knot around both pieces:

http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/HomemadeGearHammockSupports.html#Spectra


Or, my other thought it that it splits like a HH. each side of the split goes over your shoulders, cross in the front, around your back and ties in the front. The part that doesn't split could have a pocket (double layer) to put gear into. I don't know.

I made a Speer-type with a split bottom to experiment with bottom-entry. It worked, but there was a little puckering at the bottom end of the slit where you put your butt. It worked just like the HH, so it's not hard to do.

You might be onto something! You could even have each side of the split be two layers so you can put clothing inside to increase the padding. Then on the other side, you can insert a pad to give form to the pack AND for integrated insulation while you're sleeping.

Keep us posted on your experiments!

robanna
2005-06-09, 13:53
Ah....got it. You could have one piece of material 18' long. Tie an overhand knot into each end. To hang it as a hammock, fold it in half and run a webbing support through the fold to take care of one end. For the other end, put the knots together and wrap this kind of knot around both pieces:

http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/HomemadeGearHammockSupports.html#Spectra



That may be it. :elefant: I had it in my head that I needed to sew a 'pocket' for the rope to go through because that's what I've got now, but the speer no-sew style may be the ticket.

Thanks. It's always good to have another set of eyes looking at a problem.

Lanthar
2005-06-09, 16:04
also, I belive if you go with silk (http://www.garlington.biz/Ray/SilkHammock/) you can make the double fabrics out of a lighter weight silk and have a more breathable hammock at a simlar weight...

then again you may be sacrificing some water resiliancy when you're hiking... but if you bag up your stuff that shouldn't be a problem

blackdog
2005-06-09, 16:23
Another possible material is Pertex, which is available in different thicknesses. I don't know if pertex quantum is durable enough for this use, but it breathes sufficiently, as all pertex variants do.