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dropkick
2005-06-29, 05:15
I do a lot of dehydrating at home in the stove (keep thinking about buying a real dehydrater, but this has worked so far...) anyway I'm looking for some new recipes and ideas.


-My newest thing for the trail is spaghetti:
I cook hamburger in a skillet and break it into very small pieces, then I spread it on a roasting pan and cook in the oven at 200 F (I don't like to go below 160 F with meat) untill it is completely dried. (I store this in ziplocks and add to soup, etc.)
I take spagetti sauce (I like ragu) spread it on a piece of plastic wrap and cook it in a very low oven with the door cracked open untill it reaches the consistancy of a fruit wrap.
I break the spaghetti noodles into small peices (1 in.) so that it will cook fast.

The way I make the meal: add the dried burger to the water, bring to a boil, dump in noodles, stir, dump in ripped up pieces of sauce leather, stir, cover, and put in cozy (I usually use my towel) let sit for 5 to 10 min. (depends on how well cooked you like the noodles).

You can also add dried carrots, celery, mushrooms, etc. to the mix -whatever you like in spaghetti.


Anyone have some more homemade dehydrated ideas?

Seeker
2005-07-01, 13:33
i made some jerky once. got a package of meat already sliced thin from walmart (i live in a really small town, and walmart IS the grocery store... i know. weird. but i got used to it.) it probably was sliced the wrong way (with the grain instead of across it), because it came out kind of tough, but had i asked, they'd have custom cut it for me. i'll do it that way next time. it had almost no visible fat either, which is good. anyway, i hung the strips off the rack in my wife's oven (notice how i said that...) after soaking them in A-1 Sauce and worchestershire sauce for a few hours. i laid a piece of aluminum foil in the bottom to catch drips (and stay out of trouble), cracked the door open with a stick (about an inch) and set the oven at it's lowest setting, which i think was 150... tried to keep the inside at 120-125... anyway, about 4 hours later i had my first jerky... a little tough, but good. if you freeze it, it will last about 6 months. i've read a bit about when it's 'done', and it apparantly varies with temp and preference... supposedly you get a feel for it over time (like anything else, i guess), depending on your own oven or dehydrator.

there's a website called 'historicaltrekking.com', dealing with frontier re-enactors, and they have some good trail food recipes, including how to dehydrate some things... one thing i've wanted to try is 'parched corn', which is apparently just dried whole corn that's been very lightly fried in hot oil. supposedly, our ancestor woodsmen could live for a long time on it and jerky. given the high energy potential of things like corn pasta, vs the de-branned white flour we get in almost everything else we eat that's noodlish, i'm interested in knowing if anyone has ever tried it.

there's another corn-based food, which involved a dried and ground corn meal-like substance that could be added to hot or cold water and drunk, again providing a long-lasting nutrious trail food, but i forgot where i read about it and how to make it. anyone know more about it? could be it was just ground parched corn...

Seeker
2005-07-01, 14:22
dropkick,

here's a link to an article about dehydrating all sorts of stuff.


http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/shaffer58.html

dropkick
2005-07-01, 18:10
there's a website called 'historicaltrekking.com', dealing with frontier re-enactors, and they have some good trail food recipes, including how to dehydrate some things... one thing i've wanted to try is 'parched corn', which is apparently just dried whole corn that's been very lightly fried in hot oil. supposedly, our ancestor woodsmen could live for a long time on it and jerky. given the high energy potential of things like corn pasta, vs the de-branned white flour we get in almost everything else we eat that's noodlish, i'm interested in knowing if anyone has ever tried it.

there's another corn-based food, which involved a dried and ground corn meal-like substance that could be added to hot or cold water and drunk, again providing a long-lasting nutrious trail food, but i forgot where i read about it and how to make it. anyone know more about it? could be it was just ground parched corn...

The drink mix you were wondering about was either made with ground parched corn or cornmeal mixed with sugar and occasionaly with cinnamon, dried berries, or sometimes even ground jerky or lard (usually eaten dry instead of drank when mixed w/meat).
There are many variations - but the base is always ground corn and sugar.

P.S. Thanks for the link

Lanthar
2005-07-01, 18:21
dropkick, do you happen to remember what the drink was called? I seem to remember reading a similar article in boy's life, or scouting magazine or somewhere, and not remembering the name is really bugging me...

Mutinousdoug
2005-07-01, 20:17
As in: Cornmeal mush?
Then there's hominy or grits which some backward cultures add sugar to before they eat it. (bleh!)
Just a guess. My exposure to cornmeal is limited to cornbread and Annadama (yeast) bread. Oh, and maybe fish breading and tortillas. :love:

Dreadie
2005-07-01, 21:26
dropkick, you can also cook the pasta then dehydrate it. It is more work at home, but cooks quicker on the trail.

Lanthar
2005-07-01, 22:30
As in: Cornmeal mush?
Then there's hominy or grits which some backward cultures add sugar to before they eat it. (bleh!)
Just a guess. My exposure to cornmeal is limited to cornbread and Annadama (yeast) bread. Oh, and maybe fish breading and tortillas. :love:

Nah, thinner than mush...

Redleg
2005-07-02, 13:39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutinousdoug
As in: Cornmeal mush?
Then there's hominy or grits which some backward cultures add sugar to before they eat it. (bleh!)
Just a guess. My exposure to cornmeal is limited to cornbread and Annadama (yeast) bread. Oh, and maybe fish breading and tortillas.



Nah, thinner than mush...
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dropkick
2005-07-05, 08:50
Lanthar,
I can't remember the name of the drink either - at least the name I knew it by.
I did a quick search and came up with these names: tiswin, pinole, and atole.
None of them feel exactly right though.


Dreadie,
How about fresh pasta? It could be dried either before or after you cook it (boil).
I have to experiment.

Fresh pasta (basic) is flour mixed with a small amount of salt, oil, and water, then kneaded, and rolled and cut. Boil.
Variations - add egg, cooked strained vegetables, etc.