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Verlager
2005-09-18, 13:09
http://home.rochester.rr.com/ksose/ropeman.jpg
Rwandan commandos, trained by the French, carry a 20' red climbing rope with one (1) oval carabiner around their waist. In the mountainous terrain of Rwanda it makes sense for short abseiling down hills, or as a makeshift rapelling harness. Could be used carry a wounded commando to safety using his own rope. Or the rope could be tied to bulky objects. For example, 3 commandos, each attached to a shoulder loop, could pull a jeep up from a shallow ravine with a shoulder loop.

However, this type of rope is not flexible enough to strangle an enemy or to tie him up as prisoner. I'm not even sure that Commandos take prisoners, that might not be their mission.

Clever of the French, implementing the policy of each man carrying a rope. France is in Europe, where mountaineering and climbing is more accepted than in America. Perhaps the Legion trained them. Not in marching, but in more practical things like how to survive in the hilly terrain of Rwanda.

Anyone have any thoughts? Uses for the rope? History of the French as commando trainers?

Steinberger
2005-09-18, 19:58
It makes a lot of sense. Between a rope, a simple rectangle shape of fabric and a few carabiners you have 1000's of uses. Makeshift bags, shelters, harnesses, water storage, clothing, etc.. It seems like here in the US we are to focused on single purpose items but every long distance hiker I know always carries atleast 30ft of good rope with them. Who knows, it could save your life.

jimtanker
2005-09-18, 20:14
"mountaineering and climbing is more accepted (in europe) than in America.)?!!?!?!!?!?!!?!?!?!!?!? :confused:

Are you thinking about South America or something?

Seeker
2005-09-18, 23:57
the french as trainers? are you kidding? let's see...

Vietnam. Quebec. Guyana. Djibouti. Algeria. Morocco. Lebanon. Angola. Haiti. Mozambique. All stable democracies these days after a colonial period of "french training", no?

British Virgin Islands. India. Canada. Australia. Belize. Northern Somalia. Kuwait. The United States. All world trouble spots these days after a colonial period of "British Training".

Germany. Japan. The Phillipines. Hawaii. Puerto Rico. Samoa. Again, major current world trouble spots after the trauma of having been US Territories/ protectorates for years.

(and don't feed me anything about Iraq, Korea, or Vietnam. We inherited their problems because someone else screwed it up first.)

the brits thought up the idea of each man carrying a rope... it was called a toggle rope. 6' long, with a wooded toggle at one end and a spliced eye in the other... could link a bunch of them together, stand on one toggle, and reach up for the other, then pull yourself up on it. was used by their commandos in WW2, while the french were crying over their recent loss to an army about half their size.

look at the rest of the world, especially former french, italian, and spanish colonies, and then figure out who did a better job 'training' their folks... the brits, or the french? the french haven't won much recently. let's see... they had Vercingetorix... strangled by Julius Caesar around the turn of the millenium.... then they sort of flailed around getting invaded by various barbarian tribes for a few hundred years, until they surrendered to the vikings (who became the normans who invaded england... not the french) at the turn of the next millenium... then they flailed around for another 700 years until napoleon showed up. and he wasn't french, he was Corsican. even Charles deGaulle once said something about not even he could keep the french from being french...

want something done? DON'T ask the french.

jimtanker
2005-09-19, 00:58
- Gallic Wars
- Lost. In a war whose ending foreshadows the next 2000 years of French history, France is conquered by of all things, an Italian.

- Hundred Years War
- Mostly lost, saved at last by female schizophrenic who inadvertently creates The First Rule of French Warfare; "France's armies are victorious only when not led by a Frenchman." Sainted.

- Italian Wars
- Lost. France becomes the first and only country to ever lose two wars when fighting Italians.

- Wars of Religion
- France goes 0-5-4 against the Huguenots

- Thirty Years War
- France is technically not a participant, but manages to get invaded anyway. Claims a tie on the basis that eventually the other participants started ignoring her.

- War of Revolution
- Tied. Frenchmen take to wearing red flowerpots as chapeaux.

- The Dutch War
- Tied

- War of the Augsburg League/King William's War/French and Indian War
- Lost, but claimed as a tie. Three ties in a row induces deluded Frogophiles the world over to label the period as the height of French military power.

- War of the Spanish Succession
- Lost. The War also gave the French their first taste of a Marlborough, which they have loved every since.

- American Revolution
- In a move that will become quite familiar to future Americans, France claims a win even though the English colonists saw far more action. This is later known as "de Gaulle Syndrome", and leads to the Second Rule of French Warfare; "France only wins when America does most of the fighting."

- French Revolution
- Won, primarily due the fact that the opponent was also French.

- The Napoleonic Wars
- Lost. Temporary victories (remember the First Rule!) due to leadership of a Corsican, who ended up being no match for a British footwear designer.

- The Franco-Prussian War
- Lost. Germany first plays the role of drunk Frat boy to France's ugly girl home alone on a Saturday night.

- World War I
- Tied and on the way to losing, France is saved by the United States. Thousands of French women find out what it's like to not only sleep with a winner, but one who doesn't call her "Fraulein." Sadly, widespread use of condoms by American forces forestalls any improvement in the French bloodline.

- World War II
- Lost. Conquered French liberated by the United States and Britain just as they finish learning the Horst Wessel Song.

- War in Indochina
- Lost. French forces plead sickness; take to bed with the Dien Bien Flu

- Algerian Rebellion
- Lost. Loss marks the first defeat of a western army by a Non-Turkic Muslim force since the Crusades, and produces the First Rule of Muslim Warfare; "We can always beat the French." This rule is identical to the First Rules of the Italians, Russians, Germans, English, Dutch, Spanish, Vietnamese and Esquimaux.

- War on Terrorism
- France, keeping in mind its recent history, surrenders to Germans and Muslims just to be safe. Attempts to surrender to Vietnamese ambassador fail after he takes refuge in a McDonald's.

The question for any country silly enough to count on the French should not be "Can we count on the French?", but rather "How long until France collapses?"

"Going to war without France is like going deer hunting without an accordion. All you do is leave behind a lot of noisy baggage."

Or, better still, the quote from last week's Wall Street Journal: "They're there when they need you."



With only an hour and a half of research, Jonathan Duczkowski provided the following losses:

Norse invasions, 841-911.
After having their way with the French for 70 years, the Norse are bribed by a French King named Charles the Simple (really!) who gave them Normandy in return for peace. Normans proceed to become just about the only positive military bonus in France's [favour] for next 500 years.

Mexico, 1863-1864.
France attempts to take advantage of Mexico's weakness following its thorough thrashing by the U.S. 20 years earlier ("Halls of Montezuma"). Not surprisingly, the only unit to distinguish itself is the French Foreign Legion (consisting of, by definition, non-Frenchmen). Booted out of the country a little over a year after arrival.

Panama jungles 1881-1890.
No one but nature to fight, France still loses; canal is eventually built by the U.S. 1904-1914.

Napoleonic Wars.
Should be noted that the Grand Armee was largely (~%50) composed of non-Frenchmen after 1804 or so. Mainly disgruntled minorities and anti-monarchists. Not surprisingly, these performed better than the French on many occasions.

Haiti, 1791-1804.
French defeated by rebellion after sacrificing 4,000 Poles to yellow fever. Shows another rule of French warfare; when in doubt, send an ally.

India, 1673-1813.
British were far more charming than the French, ended up victors. Therefore the British are well known for their tea, and the French for their whine (er, wine...). Ensures 200 years of bad teeth in England.

Barbary Wars, middle ages-1830.
Pirates in North Africa continually harass European shipping in Meditteranean. France's solution: pay them to leave us alone. America's solution: kick their asses ("the Shores of Tripoli"). [America's] first overseas victories, won 1801-1815.

1798-1801, Quasi-War with U.S.
French privateers (semi-legal pirates) attack U.S. shipping. U.S. fights France at sea for 3 years; French eventually cave; sets precedent for next 200 years of Franco-American relations.

Moors in Spain, late 700s-early 800s.
Even with Charlemagne leading them against an enemy living in a hostile land, French are unable to make much progress. Hide behind Pyrennes until the modern day.

French-on-French losses (probably should be counted as victories too, just to be fair):

1208: Albigenses Crusade, French massacared by French.
When asked how to differentiate a heretic from the faithful, response was "Kill them all. God will know His own." Lesson: French are badasses when fighting unarmed men, women and children.

St. Bartholomew Day Massacre, August 24, 1572.
Once again, French-on-French slaughter.

Third Crusade.
Philip Augustus of France throws hissy-fit, leaves Crusade for Richard the Lion Heart to finish.

Seventh Crusade.
St. Louis of France leads Crusade to Egypt. Resoundingly crushed.

[Eighth] Crusade.
St. Louis back in action, this time in Tunis. See Seventh Crusade.

Also should be noted that France attempted to hide behind the Maginot line, sticking their head in the sand and pretending that the Germans would enter France that way. By doing so, the Germans would have been breaking with their traditional route of invading France, entering through Belgium (Napoleonic Wars, Franco-Prussian War, World War I, etc.). French ignored this though, and put all their effort into these defenses.


Seven year War 1756-1763
Lost: after getting hammered by Frederick the Great of Prussia (yep, the Germans again) at Rossbach, the French were held off for the remainder of the War by Frederick of Brunswick and a hodge-podge army including some Brits. War also saw France kicked out of Canada (Wolfe at Quebec) and India (Clive at Plassey).


The French consider the departure of the French from Algeria in 1962-63, after 130 years on colonialism, as a French victory and especially consider C. de Gaulle as a hero for 'leading' said victory over the unwilling French public who were very much against the departure. This ended their colonialism. About 2 million ungrateful Algerians lost their lives in this shoddy affair.

Sgathak
2005-09-19, 02:55
Without engaging in anymore french bashing...

I use 550 (parachute rigging cord) as an ultralight belt... feed it the same way as the Rwandan, use a UL 'biner to lock it down.

Also use 550 cord in a flat braid as my rifle sling. Light, insanely durable, and can be unbraided in emergencies.

Verlager
2005-09-19, 03:04
"mountaineering and climbing is more accepted (in europe) than in America.)?!!?!?!!?!?!!?!?!?!!?!? :confused:

Are you thinking about South America or something?
I have heard that in Europe they have TV broadcasts of competive climbing on indoor climbing walls. No such counterpart exists here in America; no ESPN show called "Competitive Climbing Finals" here on cable TV.

Maybe American couch potatoes are too obese to really get enthused about competitive climbing on TV. What self-respecting couch potato would watch a show about something that's impossible for him to do, when he can watch a sports show about an activity that he might conceivably do? Such as Nascar, golf, fishing, or late night coin collecting. People don't like to be reminded of their shortcomings or flaws.

Verlager
2005-09-19, 04:09
Without engaging in anymore french bashing...

I use 550 (parachute rigging cord) as an ultralight belt... feed it the same way as the Rwandan, use a UL 'biner to lock it down.

Also use 550 cord in a flat braid as my rifle sling. Light, insanely durable, and can be unbraided in emergencies.
http://home.rochester.rr.com/ksose/braid.jpg

Instead of a standard electrician's braid, I use a wider, more complex braid which consumes a lot of cordage (good) and which makes for a nicer heft for making bag grabs, rifle slings, belts, etc. I use a utility cordage from Neocorp (http://www.neocorp.com/store/outdoor2_a.htm#90000) the 3/16" Black Sport Cord (Part #83000). It's not real expensive, and strength is probably >400 lbs.

Known for durability and outdoor performance, this low stretch jet-black sport cord can be relied upon year after year for performance demanding uses such as kayak lines and military equipment tie-downs.

Solution-dyed fibers insure colorfastness and low reflectivity. Available on 250 ft. and 500 ft. spools. MADE IN THE USA.

Verlager
2005-09-19, 04:16
An engineer friend I had gave me some advice once. He said, "Never give an Englishman a piece of metal because he'll only do something weird with it." I have found this to be completely true.

My beef with the English is that, although they are wonderful drivers and musicians, they drop their R's which makes it difficult to understand them while watching Discovery or Science channels on TV. Does "ha-ha" mean "her hair" ? Does "Ahh Pah" mean "Air Power"? Say "computer" not "com-pU-TAH". They should use all 26 letters of the alphabet, communication is serious, rather than jazzing it up by making words more dificult to parse.

And the Aussies tense their mouths too much in speaking; they should just relax and enunciate which makes for faster speech and less whining. I would never make it into England via Heathrow Airport, because I would repeat everything spoken to me, prefaced with "Do you mean ...?" but in a natural, Yankee American style.

Seeker
2005-09-19, 14:48
JimTanker-that has got to be the funniest thing i've read in a long, long time... thanks.

"and now, back to our regular programming..."

Verlager/Sgathak,

your ideas sound good. but what sort of braid do you use? any pictures/instructions? i'd be interested in trying my hand at a belt... i can only do a 3-strand braid, but know others are possible... even if i don't use it, it never hurts to know a new skill.

you're right about the televising of climbing as a sport... i think some of that has to do with population density... indoor walls are probably more popular in europe, outdoor climbing is probably more accessible in the States. couch potato syndrome probably has something to do with it too.

jimtanker
2005-09-19, 18:03
You all need to move up to the northwest then. Indoor walls, natural rock its all going on up here. And if I were to pay for more than just basic cable I could watch shows about climbing and other outdoor sports too.

Verlager
2005-09-19, 20:52
You all need to move up to the northwest then. Indoor walls, natural rock its all going on up here. And if I were to pay for more than just basic cable I could watch shows about climbing and other outdoor sports too.
There are no cable TV shows here in Rochester, NY about competitive rock climbing in the USA. 99% of Americans don't even know that it exists. But, I didn't know the sport of wakeboarding existed until I saw it on ESPN. Climbing is a little too cerebral and slow paced for USA TV audiences.

Many people think that TV is a medium by which advertisers bring their products to the general public. Cable operators sell blocks of time to network executives who sell it to advertisers based on how many viewers will likely watch. That makes you, the viewer, the actual product, bought and sold.

Remember, in TV, the vanishing point is the viewer. -Marshall McLuhan

BTW, there is one thing that the French do differently and, I think, better, than Americans, and that is rock climbing. The French are supposedly more cerebral and circumspect, they plan their climbing routes. Americans try to "flash" a climb, their goal is to conquer by physical aggression.

Seeker
2005-09-19, 21:44
hmm... satellite then, maybe?

Sgathak
2005-09-19, 22:23
Fingerweaving

http://www.stringpage.com/braid/fl/fingerloop.html

Using a very slight bit of imagination, you can see how this would create a braid with 10 strings, or 1 single string that has been looped upon itself.

My belt is unwoven, just a length of 550, looped like in the thread founders picture, and connected with a UL 'biner.

Seeker
2005-09-19, 23:58
thanks... looks good... i just now noticed the original picture... might have been blocked by the network/LAN, or more likely, i was busy bashing the french and not paying attention...

thanks again for the link.

Icemanat95
2005-09-20, 20:25
There are countless rock and ice climbing festivals in the US every year. I used to keep track of it. New York has one of the premier climbing areas in the Northeast, The Shawanagunks. In New Hampshire, there are Frankenstein Cliffs at Mt. Cannon, White Horse ledge and Cathedral Ledge in North Conway and tons of very tough climbs throughout the Whites. There are many good cliff climbs in Acadia National Park. Go out west and there's tons of climbing all over the west. Most YMCA's have climbing walls now, as do many high school gyms.

Some of the best big-wall climbing in the world is found in Yosemite National Park.

Pick up a copy of Climbing Magazine sometime to see just how big climbing is in the US.

Icemanat95
2005-09-20, 20:28
http://home.rochester.rr.com/ksose/ropeman.jpg
Clever of the French, implementing the policy of each man carrying a rope. France is in Europe, where mountaineering and climbing is more accepted than in America. Perhaps the Legion trained them. Not in marching, but in more practical things like how to survive in the hilly terrain of Rwanda.

Anyone have any thoughts? Uses for the rope? History of the French as commando trainers?

The 101st Airborne, Screaming Eagles, Air Assault Division has incorporated a piece of climbing rope and a carabiner in their individual equipment for at least twenty years and probably closer to 35. This is nothing new, and certainly not original to the French.

Verlager
2005-09-21, 00:37
I first became interested in ropes when I had a task which required ropes. An introductory climbing course revealed that using rope could involve knots and pulleys and it actually took me a year or so to get proficient with rigging.

There's a lot they don't tell you, stuff not in books -stuff you learn only by careful examination of rope and knots. For example, I've never seen an explanation of how to collapse a trucker's hitch anywhere. Maybe it's so obvious as not to warrant an explanation. I think it's silly to use it w/o knowing the trick.

I use ropes nearly everyday. Today I swam in Canandaigua Lake with a woman friend and two large Newfoundland dogs, which required tethering. I enter the water wearing sandals, walk out to a depth of 6', tie the sandals to a rock midpoint on a 5' rope, put my swim fins on and enjoy snorkeling. After I am done swimming, the procedure is reversed. My friend tells me that I shouldn't swim right after eating, but I fed my goldfish earlier and they went swimming right away. Myth busted!

Sounds real easy, doesn't it? But a lot can go wrong. It it requires at least 3-4 good knots ( a stopper for the buoy float, a line grab for the gear attachment, and a friction-based (not free sliding) adjustable loop for the rock anchor. Next summer, I'll move it out to 12' and tie all knots underwater, just for kicks. I have emphysema, being a heavy ex-smoker, my lungs are a waste. So I adapt!

I'm convinced that any practical rope knowledge you pick up will pay off handsomely. It has increased my effectiveness a lot.

Yes, that knot in the pic is Blake's Hitch (http://www.iland.net/~jbritton/blakeshitch.htm) which is easy to tie, and a great rope clamp. It's an arborist ascending knot, it grabs when the line is tugged, but releases instantly when the knot itself is moved. My thumb is in there as an aid to tying it.

Of the dozen or so rope grabs (dogleg sliders), the worst is the tautline hitch. Adding more turns for greater friction causes the inboard (near) turns to compress, while the outer loops slacken. This reduces the integrity as well as its profile. If someone was whistling and walking down the street, tying a tautline hitch, and suddenly caught fire, I wouldn't cross the street to pee on them.

JAK
2005-09-24, 02:25
Interesting. I am fond of ropes from years and years of small boat sailing but I have done nothing in the way of mountaineering since basic training, which war very little.

I simply use 2-3 pegs nails and 2-3 4'x3/16" stiff prestretched dacron braided lines of a bright colour for my poncho tarp. These 2-3 together make a nice belt and if I use only 2 I still have a belt. I think these 3 ropes are also sufficient for improvising a leg splint along with a blue foam pad and some wood. The 3/16" stiff 8-plait prestretch dacron is what I am used to for control lines on small boat sailing and is easy to tie and saves me from having to piss on my hands to get the job done in cold freezing rain and wind.

I also carry 2-3 extra shoe laces and use those for hanging a lantern or tieing my compass onto my shirt pocket and any extra tarp line in a situation. These should not be any old shoe laces but should be the strongest and most durable lanyard that will still fit through the eyelets. 1/16", 1/12", or 1/8" dacron lanyard in a looser braid makes a good strong shoelace or bootlace and if it is too slippery to hold a bow you can make rub it on a spruce tree. A bootlace or even a running shoe lace is a good useful length and diameter for many things, usually lanyards and lashings. Leather laces are also useful for some things and provide a certain ambiance, so I might have a set of these. I think my candle lantern is on a leather lace. I think my leather winter boots have leather laces but I don't trust them and so my spare lanyards are dacron, right diameter and length.

Good site for learning to tie your shoes all over again:
http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/knots.htm

Roots from a Black Spruce are long and thin and very strong and can be split and used for lashings, or tieing shoes, or even making traditional birch bark canoes. I would like to learn how to make a bow and arrow and snow shoes while in the woods. I suppose a bow string would be good to bring along, and maybe a few arrows. I understand the bow is the easy part.

I would like more rope if I had a use for it where I hike. I think in an emergency ascend or descend a thinner rope would do but a stretchier rope would probably be better. I would like to know a little more about it without having to go whole hog mountaineering. I would imagine 50 feet of parachord could be used but I have never been able to justify carrying it. I should look into local search and rescue and see what they carry and what they do with it. I would like to know what the thinnest and shortest and lightest line is that might still be of some use in an emergency climbing or lowering situtation.

Verlager
2005-09-24, 23:42
I would like more rope if I had a use for it where I hike. I think in an emergency ascend or descend a thinner rope would do but a stretchier rope would probably be better. I would like to know a little more about it without having to go whole hog mountaineering. I would imagine 50 feet of parachord could be used but I have never been able to justify carrying it. I should look into local search and rescue and see what they carry and what they do with it. I would like to know what the thinnest and shortest and lightest line is that might still be of some use in an emergency climbing or lowering situtation.
The consensus is that parachute cord is actually too light for rapelling or ascending. A few people have died using it. The problem is that while parachute cord may hold an adult male weighing 180 lbs temporarily as a static load, it won't hold him in a 1' drop. And, as you know, leaving large pools of blood on the rocks is considered very poor form.

How about checking out some information about fall factors (http://www.google.com/search?q=rock+climbing+fall+factors) and carefully rethinking what diameter and strength rope you can safely entrust your life to?

JAK
2005-09-25, 09:40
The consensus is that parachute cord is actually too light for rapelling or ascending. A few people have died using it. The problem is that while parachute cord may hold an adult male weighing 180 lbs temporarily as a static load, it won't hold him in a 1' drop. And, as you know, leaving large pools of blood on the rocks is considered very poor form.

How about checking out some information about fall factors (http://home.echo-on.net/~toadhall/outside/climbing/shock.html) and carefully rethinking what diameter and strength rope you can safely entrust your life to?
Good to know. Thanks.

"Sorry buddy have to leave you down there, all I have is this parachord"

Seriously though, what would be the minimal equipment to even think about putting your weight on a rope to help yourself up or down a slope or to even just hang onto a tree? Also, how do you get your rope back after tieing to a tree and then going down a slope, other than going back up again? Like I say, I haven't done any serious climbing, but I have done some rather questionable scurrying and scrambling.

blackdog
2005-09-25, 10:00
Good site for learning to tie your shoes all over again:
http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/knots.htm
Thanks. That site solved a problem for me. It's now thoroughly bookmarked. :)

The last of his shoestring links isn't about tying anything, but interesting nonetheless:
http://www.liquidx.net/node/390

JAK
2005-09-25, 11:03
Thanks. That site solved a problem for me. It's now thoroughly bookmarked. :)

The last of his shoestring links isn't about tying anything, but interesting nonetheless:
http://www.liquidx.net/node/390I was also getting tired of having to keep asking the teacher. :)

blackdog
2005-09-25, 16:54
I was also getting tired of having to keep asking the teacher. :)
My daughter kept untying her shoelaces. With Ian's security knot, she can no longer do that, unless she suddenly turns to Hulk... There was also a type of one-hand lacing there that can be used by my nephew. A good site. :)

Verlager
2005-09-25, 17:49
Seriously though, what would be the minimal equipment to even think about putting your weight on a rope to help yourself up or down a slope or to even just hang onto a tree?
A 5-1 safety factor is recommended; if the line must hold 200 lbs, get a rope that can hold 5x200 or 1000 lbs.



Also, how do you get your rope back after tieing to a tree and then going down a slope, other than going back up again? Like I say, I haven't done any serious climbing, but I have done some rather questionable scurrying and scrambling.GearExpress has a Video Guide to Knots (http://www.gearexpress.biz/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=G&Product_Code=0149) (for climbers), a great starter knot video, costs about $20.00 USD. It documents the macrame, used to retrieve a rope after a descent. One end is your rapelling rope, the other is the retrieval rope. BTW, this video is for adults engaged in serious ropework, like climbing. It is not designed to show Cub Scouts how to tie an overhand knot in 3 easy steps.

I also see a Basic Climbing Rope Handling Tying Knots and More DVD (http://www.bodyresults.com/p1RopeHandlingDVD.asp?a=1) for $18.

http://home.rochester.rr.com/ksose/macrame.jpg

PKH
2005-09-26, 14:13
the french as trainers? are you kidding? let's see...

Quebec. All stable democracies these days after a colonial period of "french training", no?

want something done? DON'T ask the french.

Are you seriously suggesting that the province of Quebec (that's part of British trained Canada, mind you) is not a stable democracy?

I would have hoped your historical research skills were a little better Seeker. :)

cheers

PKH

JAK
2005-09-26, 18:29
Verlager,
Thanks again.

Interesting photo. I imagined something involving two rope ends but I figured if either end let go you would be done for. I think I will limit myself to a 3 foot drop until I learn some more.

Verlager
2005-09-26, 22:05
Verlager,
Interesting photo. I imagined something involving two rope ends but I figured if either end let go you would be done for. I think I will limit myself to a 3 foot drop until I learn some more.The guy in the pic is a senior Los Angeles County SAR (Search and Rescue) guy and he explains the knot in a friendly and understandable way.

I got the VHS and played it every night, sometimes 3x, for about 2 months. It was hard at first. But then, armed with basic tools and methods, I was able to branch out and learn faster. BTW, I converted the VHS tape to an mpg file so I could play it on my comp or burn it to DVD later, in case the tape wore out.

I sometimes watch it and marvel that I was ever that much of a beginner. But the methods and knots are worth honing up on.

Seeker
2005-09-27, 01:51
Are you seriously suggesting that the province of Quebec (that's part of British trained Canada, mind you) is not a stable democracy?

I would have hoped your historical research skills were a little better Seeker. :)

cheers

PKH

sorry for the delay in answering... been dealing with a little windstorm we had down here in another stable remnant of french colonialism...

no, not seriously... most of my 'busting' on quebec was tongue in cheek, but you must admit that even among canadians, the quebecers are considered a bit 'odd'... i seem to recall them wanting to seceed from canada a few years back, which missed passing a general vote by a narrow margin, and if i'm not mistaken, there was a guy with a newspaper in montreal maybe? (could have been from ontario though, since it's also close to fort drum) who is absolutely convinced that the 10th Mtn Division at fort drum is poised there for the express purpose of invading canada. (i was stationed there for a few years, and never saw those particular plans, nor did we ever rehearse them... mostly we worried about central america.)

Sgathak
2005-09-27, 03:21
"mostly we worried about central america."

Brilliant! Take a Division born for mountain warfare, conceived and trained in heart of Colorados 14,000 ft peaks... Cut their balls off and stick them in New York (where "mountains" are molehills)... And then make them worry about Jungle Fighting.

NICE!

PKH
2005-09-27, 09:16
Yeah Seeker, I know full well it was tongue in cheek - most entertaining too - but I just have to call people on little things like this.

Take care, and perhaps you should avoid froggy regions in the future. Hey, wait a sec - Louisiana is one of those regions . . . . . . . . . . .

PKH

Kea
2005-11-07, 00:37
Given that this is the 11th Night that the French have allowed lawless Muslims to burn everything in sight, and FINALLY Jacques Chirac vows to make them pay, I would actually like to see how it would work out in terms of the insightful analysis of French military history.

:laugh:

Verlager
2005-11-11, 10:18
Given that this is the 11th Night that the French have allowed lawless Muslims to burn everything in sight, and FINALLY Jacques Chirac vows to make them pay, I would actually like to see how it would work out in terms of the insightful analysis of French military history. :laugh:The Muslims are scaring the French, showing what they are willing to do, if not appeased. Tearful France will solve the tension by bribing the Muslims, increasing welfare payments, giving them BS jobs, fatter paychecks, and more promotions. It's clearly the path of least resistance and it's a solution that works fine here in the USA.