PDA

View Full Version : Items I leave behind



Verlager
2005-11-05, 22:11
What gear would you categorically reject taking with you on a hiking trip?
Anything you previously hauled, but have now outgrown?


My List:


tent stake puller (a simple fixed loop works as well)
gas lantern (too bulky)
chaps (not dual purpose)
bar of soap (liquid soap is better)
large flashlight (use a single cell AA LED flashlight)
tent (a dumb idea)
frying pan (not worth the weight)
toilet paper (use the top flap of your backpack)
white gas stove (alcohol stoves are lighter and simpler)
binoculars (a pain to carry and use)
suntan lotion (I'm in the woods)

Turk
2005-11-06, 10:55
Gear I have outgrown: (ewwww this is shameful looking back)


Then: ------------ and -------------------- Now:

Mini Mag-lite: - yes the 2AA one. ------------- Pelican L1 LED.

Several UL tents -------------- HH, UL backpacker

MSR 1.4 Lit steel pot and lid, -------------- Snowpeak TI mini solo
steel cup, and bowl.

camp shoes ie- running shoes -------------- barefoot, or stay in boots

Tyvek 8'x10' multipurpose tarp -------------- silnylon 6' hex tarp

Wool clothing, heavy, bulky fleece ------------ Moonstone microfleece

Canned foods, bottled liquor ------------- lighter dehydrated foods,
----------------------------------------------- controlled substances.

90 litre, external frame, canvas -------------- 15 litre tatonka
backpack, with real leather outfitting

3/8" nylon braided rope, 100ft ------------------ 1/4" spectra cord, 50ft

3 days more food (full meals) ------------------ 3 MRE's. just in case.
than necessary, megatonnes of snacks -------- Planned snacks for each
and bars, etc never eaten ----------------------- day.

j.johnson
2005-11-06, 15:34
how do you use the top flap of your pack for TP?

I just can't picture it.

Turk
2005-11-06, 18:23
Gear I would reject at all times, when the purpose is "hiking". Simply
because it either takes away from the experience or is supremely impractical.

** - Car camping, stop-and-plop camping etc, excluded*

1. Cast Iron Cookware

2. Laptops, cell phones, sound systems with speakers instead of earphones.
portable DVD players, personal gaming systems.

3. Folding Camp chairs.

4. Camp showers (The solar baggie deals.)

5. Blue jeans

6. Beer in any form, bottles, cans or kegs.

7. Pretty much anything made by Coleman. (Sure it will work, but virtually
any other brand is going to be lighter, for almost any piece of gear)

8. coolers and ice packs.

9. portable electric generators.

10. Reluctant wives. (you're only fooling yourself)

Verlager
2005-11-06, 19:21
how do you use the top flap of your pack for TP? I just can't picture it.Just set the nylon cordura pack up against a tree, loosen the top flap. Turn around, grap the top flap, bend your knees slightly, and gently, carefully, wipe your backside. Later, when you get home, simply wash the entire pack in the bathtub with Woolite.

dropkick
2005-11-06, 19:24
how do you use the top flap of your pack for TP?

I just can't picture it.

Verlager's a bit of a surrealist, he likes to create an unreal situation in order to see how people will respond to it.
I extremely doubt that he uses his pack as t.p. If he really does.....YUCK
I also kind of doubt that he would bring his chaps on a hike. A motorbike or horse ride maybe.

dropkick
2005-11-06, 19:39
Turk,
I agree with most of what you say except for 2 items:

camp shoes
If my feet are miserable so is the rest of me, and switching shoes makes for happy and healthy feet. I sometimes even carry 3 pair of foot covers - 1 for hiking, 1 for camp, and 1 for swimming/wading/fishing/bathing.

blue jeans
I grew up wearing these, and during spring and fall (also depending on terrain sometimes during summer) I can't think of better pants for hiking. They are inexpensive, very durable, and protect your flesh.

GregH
2005-11-06, 19:42
Verlager's a bit of a surrealist...I extremely doubt that he uses his pack as t.p.

I have this mental picture of Verlager hiking down the trail, a cloud of flies trailing behind!

PKH
2005-11-06, 20:35
Ah Verlager, that's something I don't really want to see on the trail.

Cheers,

PKH

jimtanker
2005-11-06, 20:49
Now lets just hold on a minute. Do we know what "Verlager" even means?

It might mean "one who whipes them self on their house."

Sgathak
2005-11-06, 23:18
he likes to create an unreal situation in order to see how people will respond to it.

Thats called being a troll.

bird dog
2005-11-07, 04:42
One thing I no longer carry along on trips: My 6'3", 245 pound brother. If we encounter a bear on the trail, he could certainly squeeze it until it pops. While he is good for conversation, he is not the fastest hiking partner.

Seeker
2005-11-07, 07:36
i carried one of those in somalia and haiti... well, the 'zac' model went to somalia with me... 5'8", 200+lbs... nice to bunk next to... both he and the 'mike' model (6'3, 235+lbs) went to haiti... again, nice to sleep between when bullets might fly... good friends... both faster than me too, running with a load... wonder why...

seriously, gear i've given up for most solo backpacking....

kelty trekker backpack for a golite gust
TNF thunderhead sleeping bag for a WM caribou
nalgene bottles for reused water bottle
reliance 6qt bladder for platypus 2qt
msr simmerlight or peak1 for an ion stove
red aluminum fuel bottle for reused soda bottle
lexan fork and knife-just don't carrry anymore
msr blacklite pots (yes, 2) for MSR Titan kettle or walmart grease pot
mini mag lite for headlamp
micromaglite for photon
water filter for aquamira drops
nylon cord for spectra
swiss champ knife for tinker model
ozark trail tent for HH UB Asym

Jim Henderson
2005-11-07, 14:37
I ALWAYS leave behind my 1Qt Stanley Stainless Steel Thermos.

My very first backpack(city boy) trip I foolishly took along my trusty Stanley Thermos with leather neck strap, since of course I would need water. I think these things weigh about 80 pounds empty.

As I hiked back up the hellashish hill with my empty thermos, I was severely tempted to throw it over the cliff. Man did I want a drink, but one quart doesn't last me long.

I should have taken my trusty GI canteen, it would have weighed far less. This was back in the 70s when light weight water containers were not common.

I also leave behind my GI Pocket stove and lantern. I rarely take a tent.

I am still pretty bad about packing too much.

Jim Henderson

Jim Henderson
2005-11-07, 14:41
One thing I no longer carry along on trips: My 6'3", 245 pound brother. If we encounter a bear on the trail, he could certainly squeeze it until it pops. While he is good for conversation, he is not the fastest hiking partner.


But remember...

You don't have to outrun the bear, just the slowest person in your group.

In my case, I usually trip someone.

Jim Henderson

dropkick
2005-11-07, 18:23
One thing I no longer carry along on trips: My 6'3", 245 pound brother. If we encounter a bear on the trail, he could certainly squeeze it until it pops. While he is good for conversation, he is not the fastest hiking partner.
An NFL lineman was being lead into the back country by a guide who was small in stature. The further they hiked the more thoughtful the lineman got as he looked at the guide.
Suddenly he said "You know I'm a pretty big guy and you're not. If I got injured how would you get me out of here?"
The guide thought for a minute and said "Well, I hauled a 700 pound elk out of here last year."
"How did you do it?" asked the lineman.
"Made 4 trips." replied the guide

Icemanat95
2005-11-08, 12:19
I suspect you are all missing a significant implication. He said "your pack" meaning that he uses the top lid of someone else's pack as TP, thereby ensuring that the flies go after someone else.

fly.fast
2005-11-09, 00:34
Uh, what were we talking about? There are a lot of things I don't take any longer. So many things have changed.

MSR Whisperlite stove -> Ion
1 lb of white gas -> few oz. of alcohol
TNF Cat's Meow -> down bag
SD Orion 3 tent -> TarpTent
Therm-a-Rest Ultralight -> zLite
1.5l MSR Stainless pot -> .7l Ti pot
Change of clothes -> none
Therm-a-Rest chair -> none
Dana Design Glacier pack -> GG G4
Tons of food -> 26-32 oz/day
Leatherman -> sub-1 oz. knife
Bowl -> none
TNF parka & pants -> UL rain jacket
Nalgene bottles -> Platypus soft bottle
Heavy Asolo Gore-Tex boots -> running shoes
First Need H2O filter -> Aqua Mira
Repair kit -> a few feet of duct tape
8 oz. first aid kit -> 1.5 oz. first aid kit

Looking at the list, it seems like a huge change. But it happened over several years. Hiking is a lot more fun this way.

One of my early hiking buddies carried a CD player and speakers. The real pinnacle of his gear was a big Garmin GPS with an external antenna, mounted on a wooden dowel attached to his pack. Small wonder that he couldn't last long enough in the evening to enjoy the campfire. What a load!

Kea
2005-11-09, 00:50
12 year old Drama Queen Daughter -> 10 year old Daughter who likes to hike, doesn't complain on the trail, and carries her own pack. :)

14oz MSR stainless pot -> Snow Peak titanium whose weight is vastly less.
Too many snacks -> Fewer snacks and better planned.
Leave home half the Gatorade powder, since drinking it full strength makes me nauseous.
3 Nalgene bottles -> 1 Nalgene to use with water filter and 2 liter Aquafina or other brand.

I may ditch the hydration bladder for liter disposables.

Sooner or later I may convert to the hammock, but it won't be this year.

Kea
2005-11-09, 00:56
One of my early hiking buddies carried a CD player and speakers. The real pinnacle of his gear was a big Garmin GPS with an external antenna, mounted on a wooden dowel attached to his pack. Small wonder that he couldn't last long enough in the evening to enjoy the campfire. What a load!

I take a Kenwood D7a with APRS and the Etrex to report my position. I am trying to decide if the 2# gel cell is worth the weight for longer trips, or whether to run things on disposable lithium. I will carry the radio regardless, so picking the power for it is the real trick

dropkick
2005-11-10, 01:02
I take a Kenwood D7a with APRS and the Etrex to report my position. I am trying to decide if the 2# gel cell is worth the weight for longer trips, or whether to run things on disposable lithium. I will carry the radio regardless, so picking the power for it is the real trick
Why not a NiMh and a solar charger?
Did a quick search on your radio (cool radio, by the way) and found that they make a 7.6 volt NiMh battery for it. If you had it you could then either build a lightweight charger or make a few modifications to a manufactured solar charger and have power that you don't have to worry about.
And both together would weigh less than the gell.

Plus then you could charge any other powered gear.

SGT Rock
2005-11-11, 10:39
Lets see:

Gas stoves
2 quart pot
Trowel (one trip)
MREs
Large towel
Tent
Camp shoes
Camp clothing
Water filter
Hoser water system

Verlager
2005-11-14, 02:37
I also kind of doubt that he would bring his chaps on a hike. A motorbike or horse ride maybe.Nylon chaps prevent the dew or rain on the wet brush from wetting your trousers as you walk thru it.

Chaps are for hikers who go off-trail, or hike in dense brush.

dropkick
2005-11-14, 03:02
Oh... didn't think of that, good idea.

Only people who use them around here are the cowboy wannabees**, the bikers, and the people with funny dating habits.

**real cowboys sometimes (very seldom) wear them on special occasions.
-the real cowboy is the normally dressed in a baseball cap, t-shirt, jeans, and tennis shoes (unless he's 60+ then he wears the boots and hat).

Just Jeff
2005-11-14, 10:50
Backpacking Light just had some gear reviews of rain chaps. It said they were pretty good for the rain, and breathed decently (chimney effect), but the testers had to be careful about sitting because the chaps obviously don't cover the butt like rain pants do.

The ONLY time I've ever seen my father-in-law outside without his boots and hat is at the wedding. Seriously - I've NEVER seen him wear anything other than boots, cowboy hat, jeans, and a long-sleeve buttoned shirt (old working kind - flannel in winter, very thin material in summer). He used his horse for farm chores in Nebraska.
Never seen him in chaps, though. And he's 60+, so you were right on, dropkick.

SGT Rock
2005-11-14, 11:14
I tried the rain chaps, wasn't that impressed. They protect your legs from getting wet, but just your legs. Not you butt or groin. Depending on your rain top, this may not be too much of an issue, but then again, you can't sit naked in them and do your laundry unless you are at a fetish nightclub.

Kea
2005-11-14, 14:01
Why not a NiMh and a solar charger?
Did a quick search on your radio (cool radio, by the way) and found that they make a 7.6 volt NiMh battery for it. If you had it you could then either build a lightweight charger or make a few modifications to a manufactured solar charger and have power that you don't have to worry about.
And both together would weigh less than the gell.

Plus then you could charge any other powered gear.


We've discussed solar charging systems for backpacking and the problem is that anything that will actually charge the radio will be heavy, if there is actually enough wattage to charge it,

7.6 volt batteries also don't let the rig output at full power. You'd have to accept 1 watt of output, which is far better than FRS wilderness rigs, but possibly not enough to get you out to an APRS network.

Though I do have a potentially useful charger made from a cast off solar pattio light which would charge AA for the GPS.

Heartlander
2005-11-14, 19:41
That's very interesting regarding the solar charger.

Item I learned to leave behind..albeit we're goin back a ways here-
The 6-pack of Shlitz.

Hey it was popular not all that long ago.
....wasn't it?
:rolleyes:

dropkick
2005-11-15, 02:21
We've discussed solar charging systems for backpacking and the problem is that anything that will actually charge the radio will be heavy, if there is actually enough wattage to charge it,

7.6 volt batteries also don't let the rig output at full power. You'd have to accept 1 watt of output, which is far better than FRS wilderness rigs, but possibly not enough to get you out to an APRS network.

Though I do have a potentially useful charger made from a cast off solar pattio light which would charge AA for the GPS.

You ought to check into PowerFilm. They are basically a sheet of plastic.
I built my backpacking charger from these, and the wires I used to hook the cells together weigh more than the cells do.
Unlike the style old cells they're bendable and I have almost no worries that I might damage them.
The cells I purchased put out 3 volts, 25mA, or .75 Watts each, and depending on how I hook them together I can either up the amps (parallel) or up the voltage (series), and either choice ups the wattage.
I have to guess when the batteries are charged with my system, but with a little practice that isn't a problem.

Good place to look into them (I have delt with and like this company - also inexpensive):

www.shop.texasolar.com

Verlager
2005-11-16, 23:10
Ah Verlager, that's something I don't really want to see on the trail. Cheers,PKHI'm not 100% sure that you regularly get to the type of places where I hike. I go off trail a bit.

Gramps
2005-12-14, 22:30
...would make a list too large to read. I began thinking about what not to include when I packed to help plant trees with my scout troop in 1948, and could tell right away that I had asked myself the wrong question. My experiences since that time more or less confirmed my choice, but I can remember several examples of what others carried, any of which should have been obvious non-choices. One young man hiking into the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon for a two-week trip decided to take a truck battery so he could recharge his Walkman and his camera... he seemed to regret the choice after no more than a few miles, for some reason.
Instead of deciding what not to take, try it my way. I imagine myself waking up, early and comfortable, and ask myself what I will want to have. Everything in my pack is secondary, since the most important thing to have in the woods is a clear understanding of your situation, and how to get along in it. (Sort of a reverse snowball effect...)
The only items in my pack are those which will materially add to my comfort, or make things very convenient, or provide amusement. As I mentioned in an earlier reply (In a conversation about survival kits), if you carry lots of equipment and depend on it to save you, you should consider staying home. I sleep warm, stay well fed, am relaxed and contented with very little, and feel no need to damage the countryside in order to do so--unless I need to defend my little bit of ground. (I learned early that if you back a mouse into a corner, you're likely to get bit...and unlike a mouse, I keep my little .357 handy.)
My weekend pack weighs in at four pounds before I add food, and it hasn't gone much over five when full, for a very long time. Entertainment often consists of listening, looking, sketching and whistling.
In answer to the "what not to take" question, ...Don't take along too much civilization.

Seeker
2005-12-15, 11:48
ok... i'll bite... i gotta know what your packing list is... there's a guy over on whiteblaze who claims a similar weight, but refuses to publish his list. he obviously has a LOT of experience, and, as we all know, experience can be a replacement for some gear... but he won't publish it because he's afraid some fool will go out and get himself in trouble trying to survive with his equipment alone, but without his experience... hope you don't feel the same... it would give me reason to relook an already light pack (about 12 lbs) and see what i could experiment with...

PKH
2005-12-15, 12:32
Yeah, I just have to chime in here too. The lightest base weight I've achieved is 10.6 lbs, and there are no frills and luxuries in that load. Short of going naked and filling my pack bag with helium . . . . . .

How do you do it? I believe you - I just don't understand it.

Cheers,

PKH

Seeker
2005-12-15, 16:26
i'm not even skeptical... i've seen a super-ultralightweight, or whatever the current buzzword is, list on another site, backpacking magazine maybe, and it's definitely possible, just kinda weak, in my opinion... the guy who put that one together looked really young, which is ok. but he was placing a lot of faith in the weather being cooperative... he was covered, literally, if things went south, but i just didn't think his 'list' was really workable every day for a thru hike...

also, people use different definitions for 'packweight'... some carry things in their pockets that i'd carry in my pack... i don't care what it weighs, really... i just want to see what you carry, and i'll add it up my own way...

so, i just wanted to see what someone else used that, like i said, might make me think, or, more importantly, teach me something...

bird dog
2005-12-16, 20:24
Seeker, as usual I agree with you. Id like to look at that list too. I do consider myself pretty experienced for my age as Ive been in the woods most of my life. Ive been experimenting with my pack for the last several trips and never really weighed it. I did however just the other day buy a digital fishing scale to get a sense of what my weight is. (I still need a new bag and plan on buying one after the new year). Kind of got off track, but in a nutshell, my curiosity is peaked. I would love to have a look at that packing list too Gramps so that I can learn something. Seeker, will you still respect me after you see my pack when we go hiking? Im younger than you are and can handle a few extra pounds (Just kidding). Like most, I visit this site to learn much more so than to impart wisdom. BD

Sgathak
2005-12-16, 22:20
Theres quite few lists on backpackinglight that are stupid light.
They just had a "challenge" to create a winter-worthy super-rediculous-moronically-light.
They ended up with 2 lists... 1 is 5lbs, 1 is 6lbs.

If my gear were made with the uber-super-mega-ultra-fantabuloso-light materials, and as small as physically possible, I would easily have a sub 5 lbs pack and still carry the same number of items.... but Im not willing to bet the farm on a tarp made out of "rip stop seran wrap" or seriously consider wearing nothing more than a speedo and a smile to cut my FSO weight.

Im happy with my 2.5lbs pack, 2.5lbs synthetic sleeping bag, and my 1.5oz poncho/tarp shelter....

And to be honest, if my pack weighed 4oz, my sleeping bag 14oz, and my shelter weighed 3oz.... Id spend my hike being worried my pack would fall apart, my sleeping bag wouldnt be warm enough, and a stiff breeze would rip my shelter to bits.

Seeker
2005-12-19, 13:08
sgathak,

i agree. the 'superultralight', or whatever it's called, trend is dangerous... anyone who reads my posts will notice that i do not call my self even a lightweight backpacker... those labels, and their definitions, are stupid. i simply strive for the lightest pack i feel comfortable with... i'm not willing to sacrifice safety for weight.... if someone has more experience, their comfort level goes up (gramps, for example, or rock, or slogger, or granny gatewood)... i'm using equipment right now that i'd not have thought i could use years ago (alky stove. gust backpack. hammock.) the fact that my pack can weigh between 12 and 15 lbs is beside the point. but there is a point where 'lighter faster higher harder' becomes insanity... 'trekking', 'peak bagging', and 'superultralight' are three words i can do without... but maybe to some people, it is a sport... with me, it's more a spiritual thing...

i'm here to learn and to share, good and bad, what works and what doesn't...

so Gramps... care to share?

Sgathak
2005-12-19, 15:13
Im sure Ive mentioned this before, but wilderness survival is one of my "hobbies", and from that study I FIRMLY beleive that knowledge is vastly more important than having the right toys when it comes to staying alive.... Or as the catchphrase for a firm I once worked for goes "Ability over Technology".

I can and have gone out with little more than a pocketknife and made myself a quite respectable living out in the brush... and did it wearing little more than sandals, shorts, and a t-shirt. Thats an FSO of less than 16oz. Not bad. Going light and being safe CAN be done.

The problems occur when people rely on their "technology". When going this light, improvisation is king. That rip stop seranwrap might rip to shreds in a heavy wind... but it can still make a good windproof/waterproof base for an emergency "wikiup", which can withstand some SERIOUS abuse... but, carrying a knife of any value was "too heavy" so they have an X-acto blade and thats it. Ever try to cut a 1in switch with an X-acto blade???? Some of the truely stupid dont carry a blade at all!!!!!

You *might* not *need* a knife 99 out of 100 trips... but that 1 time you do need it... you REALLY NEED IT.

I could make an arguement for most of the gear they carry... and my pack will probably still be heavier than theirs... but if you take everything away from me, Im naked. You take everything away from them, they are dead.

Seeker
2005-12-19, 15:36
but if you take everything away from me, Im naked. You take everything away from them, they are dead.

i agree.

hmm. 'error message' said my response is too short. wonder if it's long enough now... (wtf? :hmmmm: )

Gramps
2005-12-22, 15:47
Wow! If I'd thought I was gonna draw that much fire, I might have kept my head down! Let's see if I can sort this out. First, for Seeker : I would not recommend that you adopt my packlist...or anybody's, for that matter. I've been keeping track of mine for some 57 years because I'm basically lazy and don't want to haul any more than I'm going to use. I believe that it's fun and informative to discuss items of gear--like sleeping bags--but I do not believe there's a lot of value in looking at packlists, other than as a general subject. Packlists are extremely personal...I've been looking at 'em for a long time, and noticed that I have NEVER seen two alike. The lesson I take from that is that each individual has a different approach to getting through the day. In my case, I tend to think in terms of a concept I first encountered in the Army, a long time ago and far, far from here. Tactical slot. Where are you going? What do you plan to accomplish? What situations do you expect to encounter? ...and so on. (Just as an example, I don't keep one backpack; I keep four. One is for day hikes with photography and geocaching in mind, one is for weekends in moderate weather, one is for exploring and one is for hunting. They are radically different.) PKH: sounds to me like you are satisfied with your current gear. Good for you! ...so why change? Bird Dog: Much the same, and I sorta envy you your youth!!! ...and Sgathak...I agree with you! Don't carry gear you don't trust! But you hit the nail on the head; when people rely on inadequate gear,they're courting trouble! I'd take that one step further, though, and base it on your comment about not needing a knife 99 out of 100 times, but that when you need one, you really need it. The difference is that you seem to convey that this is a reason to carry things even though you don't plan to use them. Where I differ is that I know I can produce a functional cutting edge with a couple of rocks, regardless of where I am. Let's say you do need that knife, and it breaks... or you lose it. What do you do then; give up? No matter. Our approach differs, that's all. My packlist reflects my outlook; the only things in my pack are selected for either comfort, convenience or amusement. All of my survival needs are in the back of my mind, placed there as skills; anybody can learn 'em. What I like about doing it my way is the reassurance that I can walk out of my door anywhere, anytime, under any circumstances and know that I have a reasonable chance of getting along fine. And yes, I've done so.

As to the packlist: here's my latest set-up . The list is intended for the Blue Mountains of Northeast Oregon, as a three-season weekend pack, and is not a skin-out list since I rarely go naked.

Pack; a Go-Lite daypack, some 1600 cu.ins., weighing 9 ounces. Tent; a TarpTent Virga, customized; 21 ounces. Sleeping bag; Western Mountaineering Hi-Lite, with a few personal touches; 15 ounces. Sleeping pad; a foam folder from Gossamer Gear, at 3 ounces. A down vest from Western Mountaineering, 5.5 ounces; My entire kitchen (which we can go into later), 3 ounces; a wind shirt from Go-Lite, 2.7 ounces; my "possibles" bag, 3 ounces, and my 1/2-ounce first-aid kit. In general, the whole mess runs pretty close to four pounds, and when I add fuel (3 or 4 ounces), water (17 ounces between fill-ups) and food (sometimes a whole pound!!!) I still don't feel too burdened. Occasionally I get extravagant and throw in a 1-ounce book (2"x3", from Shambala Press).

Anyway, that's a general shot at it. Details? Life's full of 'em. Good luck!

Seeker
2005-12-27, 12:14
gramps,

i wasn't looking to 'copy'... just learn. my own packing list varies with the season and purpose of the trip. thanks for sharing yours. it gives me an idea of what's possible, with skills. (note that i didn't say 'it gives me a goal'... if i get to 5 lbs eventually, fine. if not, that's ok too. i'm in it for the fun, not the adrenalin rush of living too close to the edge and getting 'lucky'. this supermegaultralight crap portrayed as a sport in some magazines and websites is gonna get someone killed, if it hasn't done so already...)

Seeker
2005-12-27, 12:18
oh... i forgot to ask... what's the ''3 oz kitchen' look like?

i'm guessing you are one of those magicians who can make a fire out of wet stones at the bottom of a lake... just kidding... but i suspect you're 'cheating' by substituting knowledge for gear... (and we can't have that! what would Columbia, TNF, and REI say?!)

so, again, i stand ready to learn...

Hog On Ice
2005-12-27, 16:08
I have to admit I am somewhat interested in the 3 ounce kitchen too - I thought I was doing good to get mine down to 4 ounces.

In my case its a chopped off Heineken keg can for a pot, a tea light candle tin for the alcohol burner, hardware cloth cylinder for a pot support, piece of foil for a bottom reflector, another piece of foil for a lid, a windscreen from the side walls of a couple of coke cans, a Spark-lite spark wheel for a lighter, and a closed cell foam cozy to do the cooking in (ie pour boiling water from can into zip lock bag in the cozy and wait for it to cook)

Edit - forgot to mention the MRE spoon

Seeker
2005-12-27, 17:18
i'm guessing a small aluminum cup/pot and that's about all... like i jokingly mentioned, i'm also guessing he cooks over a fire. (i have a cousin who, though a heavy packer, can seemingly make fire from water, rocks, and a little air... his skill level is much higher than mine...) what more do you need, really? potstand? what for? scrubbie? not really needed. a lighter? ok, maybe, but there might be a better alternative. soap? depends what you've been cooking... but then ashes work good if it was fatty... make your own soap that way. the only other thing i can think of is a spoon, and even that's not really needed... just very handy...

still, i'm interested... this is sort of like christmas, waiting for an answer...

so, mr gramps sir, what's the answer?

SowthEfrikan
2005-12-28, 11:56
Don't really leave very much behind, which could explain why my pack is usually about 25 pounds with food and water for a typical three day trip.

What has gone is a torch for a headlamp - excellent change.
Plates/bowls for ti solo cooking set - another very good move.
Camp shoes - but will take water shoes sometimes if swimming.
T-shirt to sleep in for cleanest hiking top.

Most of my gear is the lightest I could find that I was still comfortable with.

Gramps
2005-12-29, 01:07
[QUOTE=Seeker]oh... i forgot to ask... what's the ''3 oz kitchen' look like?

i'm guessing you are one of those magicians who can make a fire out of wet stones at the bottom of a lake... just kidding... but i suspect you're 'cheating' by substituting knowledge for gear... (and we can't have that! what would Columbia, TNF, and REI say?!)

What would they say? Well, one of REI's managers asked for my packlist... As for making fire out of wet stones at the bottom of a lake, I'd probably want to pick a different location, but if they're the RIGHT stones, then... But I digress. My kitchen has five components; the bottom half of a Heiniken can serves as a windscreen, stove-holder and pot support; my titanium cup serves as both cookpot and server (I sprayed the bottom with high-temp black engine paint); my alcohol stove (1/8 ounce) boils the cupful in 3-1/2 to 4 minutes, and I carry a youth-size sterling silver spoon, highly polished, because it makes me laugh to think how ridiculously out of place it looks. (I'm easily amused...) I use two spare (!) tent pins (5" aluminum gutter nails) as pot support pins. And I must have lied; I just weighed the setup again and it's getting fat; almost 3 and 1/8 ounces!!! I do all my cooking in the cup, using recipes I've developed, and supplement my hot foods with cold ones. Again, the main idea I use is to keep it simple.

Sometime back in the 1840's, Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "We don't go to the woods to rough it; we go there to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home..."

Seeker
2005-12-29, 11:10
well, if you're easily amused, you fit right in here... that 'out of context' type of humor is my favorite... i definitely understand what you mean about it...

ok... now you've got us all intrigued again... what's the alcohol stove design? 1/8th oz? i've got an ion, and it's about 3/4 of an ounce, i think (my scale doesn't go down that far...gotta get a postal scale someday.)

Gramps
2006-01-01, 00:40
Seeker; My bad; the last stage of stove building (I've made nine so far, of different designs-) weighed in at 0.133 ounce (OK - I DID go buy a digital postal scale!) but I got fancy and added a screen and a heatproof paint job, so now it's up to 0.255 ounces. Obviously, this thing needs to go on a diet... It's made of the bottoms of two 5-oz. juice cans and measures a bit less than 3/4" tall, has a filler of fiberglas fuzz, a 1" dia. center hole (screened), and has a series of 16 holes, 1/16" dia., drilled on the inside edge of the rim, facing inward horizontally so that the flame pattern is directed toward the center. Burns about 1/2 ounce of alcohol fuel to heat my cuppa. Small, but it's designed only to heat my 10-ounce cupful. ...and I'll pass the compliment on to my spoon. Cheers! G.

P.S. No, I do not carry my digital scale in my pack; it's too heavy...

Seeker
2006-01-03, 12:54
hmm... sounds almost like an ion... i think that's what i used anyway (two small juice cans.) your hole pattern seems a little different. any chance you can post a picture?

regarding your silver spoon... didn't horace kephart carry a small china teacup with him?

Gramps
2006-01-05, 01:04
Seeker: the design was based on the ion... the reason for the difference in hole pattern was to avoid spreading the flame. When you see the two patterns burning side-by-side, it's obvious that mine concentrates the heat more efficiently. If I can find your edress I'll send you a picture. I haven't been able to post one here yet, since mine seem to be too detailed for the system.
As to Kephart, his choice was faulty... a china cup is more esthetically pleasing than tin, which was available as an alternative; but it can still burn your lips, and is too fragile for packing. My titanium cup remains cool at the rim, (Let's hear it for technology!!!) and the handle can be comfortably held even while the contents are boiling, due to the low heat transfer rate of the metal... which is why I coated the bottom of my cup with black heatproof engine paint... and it's tougher than nails. And anyhow, my spoon is lighter than his china cup... and clearly more attractive.

Seeker
2006-01-05, 11:38
ok... PM me and i'll send my email... i'd really like to see a picture... i have a similar problem, if you can call it that, with the flames coming up the sides of my titan kettle... works fine on the walmart grease pot though... i think i've seen a pepsi can stove that had the holes drilled so they'd push the flame to the middle, but a picture's worth a lot, and will confirm (or deny) the image in my head... i'd love to try to build one. thanks.

oops56
2006-01-05, 14:29
Ok here is a new alcohol stove its a pumice stone 3x3/4x1-1/4 cut in half stand on edge with a space in be tween on a 1/4 oz. denatured alcohol and 91% isopropyl burns both gets a 6 min burn and the water in cup was boiling see when the stones are on edge makes a pot holder i also got two long ons to go under a 6in. pot 3/4 oz. use half & half on each i guess each gets half or 3/4 . Now in 4-1/2 min hot for coffee 5 min are so boiling total burn time 9 to 10 min it will need a wind screen if out side ok thats it for now .here how to make a easy stove get a beef stew cant the short ones pot holes a round 8 or so about 3/8 to 1/2 size on top put v cut about 1 in. long 6 or 8 but your self a trangia burner cost about 13.00$ now you can full it up almost to top cause its screw on lid has a seal in so if you don use it all up let stove cool off put lid for next it should last for a two day outing. that my two cents worth or on the tangia get some 1/8 x 3/4 alim. make a x put on buner for pot stand

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d52/oops62/cupstove1.jpg

atraildreamer
2006-10-16, 16:44
My very first backpack(city boy) trip I foolishly took along my trusty Stanley Thermos with leather neck strap, since of course I would need water. I think these things weigh about 80 pounds empty.

Take the Stanley along. If a bear attacks, you can beat him to death with the thermos, and, if it breaks, Stanley will replace it (the thermos...not the bear) free of charge! :albertein