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KLeth
2005-12-31, 06:49
This summer we had quite a tics infestation, also in places where there last year were none. In Scandinavia around 60% of the tics are infected with Borelia burgdorferi and therefore can cause the carrier Lyme borreliose aka Lyme disease.
We know that DEET (the active agent in Mosquito oil) is a very effective counter measure to tics, but it is quite toxic - Anybody know a better and less toxic counter measure ?

Of course we try to avoid exposing skin, but this can as you know be very difficult when hiking . . . . :fisheye:

My mother found one on her body, removed it and put it under a electron microscope, the picture attached is the result of this.Note that some of the tic' limbs are missing since they broke off when it was removed.
Hopefully we get new pictures of tics since we found and provided her with a new batch.

BTW Happy New Hiking Year!

Rosaleen
2005-12-31, 08:41
KLeth-

Treating clothing and gear with permethrin can help reduce the amount of DEET needed. That tick picture is ugly. It looks like the inspiration for a sience fiction film...

Rosaleen

incognito
2005-12-31, 15:12
I've experimented with peppermint oil diluted in olive oil 50/50 works well for me.

Applied ticks to a treated area, ticks start to react quickly, jump off without haste :fisheye:

Procede with caution, your skin may be sensitive to the oil.

Frequent inspection is best for those that don't want to use a deterent.

dropkick
2006-01-01, 00:50
I don't think my method would work for anyone else:
I am a mutant and ticks don't bother me.

After my Great Grandmother caught Scarlett Fever and had a very high body temperature, ticks would bite her and die.
While I don't know if I inherited the tick killing blood, I do know that I have never had a tick imbed itself in me.
- I live and recreate in an area of high tick population, and I'm one of the only people I know of (who camps/fishes/etc.) who hasn't had one. I often find them on my body, but never feeding.

Unfortunately, so far I have been unable to detect any other superpowers.


KLeth, why do you have an electron microscope?
Heck, I'm almost a superhero and even I don't have one.
SPOON! - esoteric cartoon hero reference

KLeth
2006-01-01, 03:26
I don't think my method would work for anyone else: I am a mutant and ticks don't bother me.
Salutations super-dropkick (and super-everybody else)!
OK! Have to mutate . . . . :fisheye: But then I also want the laser-vision! - Saves fuel and weight of stove :smile:
Thus it might be easier to use permethrin or peppermint oil, might just go for the peppermint, since Permethrin is suspected to cause cancer.


KLeth, why do you have an electron microscope?
Heck, I'm almost a superhero and even I don't have one.

You don't have a electron microscope ?!? - I thought everybody did! :rolleyes:

http://www.phil-fak.uni-duesseldorf.de/anglist1/staff/holteir/ba/intro1/assets/images/Gary_Larson_mammoth_microscope.jpg

Salvelinus
2006-01-01, 20:34
Dropkick--it's one of the best battlecry's ever!
hehehehe . . .

john pickett
2006-01-02, 13:19
Dropkick,
I believe if you will fill a large container (such as a 55 gallon drum) with warm water , then remove your clothes , climb in the drum, and rub your body all over with a substance we in Texas call "soap"; you will find the ticks can now bite deep enough to pierce the former coating you Montanans typically wear year round and actually suck blood.
Regards,
John Pickett :biggrin:

The HotDog
2006-01-02, 18:34
Hey, I am a mutant too. I have only found 1 tick embedded and it let go before it was fully fed. That was 4 years and 80+ nights ago and still tick free. :elefant:
Yes I take a bath regulary.
:hmpf:

Take-a-knee
2006-01-06, 00:35
Mix Flours of Sulpher with Baby Powder (half and half) and sprinkle it liberally on your clothing. The baby powder just cuts the stench and makes it stay on longer. I spent a week slithering on the ground at Ft Bragg in May(sniper school) and didn't get a single tick on me. Others in the class who didn't want to smell like sulpher got lots of ticks.

The permethrin thing works very well and, if done right, is good for the life of the garment. I have the concentration around here somewhere if anyone is interested.

KLeth
2006-01-06, 02:34
Seems like tics have a very keen smelling and/or tasting capabilities.
Sulphur might be a good idea - It's not tic season here yet (they don't like snow and frost) but I'm looking forward to test the different methods mentioned here.

Please let's have the peremethrin concentration :smile:

I thought snipers were'nt supposed to smell af anything unnatural . . . . . Like aftershave, soap, deodorant, fabric softener, detergent and sulphur :fisheye: ?

dropkick
2006-01-06, 03:09
I wonder if ticks are anything like mosquitos?
Mosquitos are attracted to people who eat salt heavy foods and sweets.


I have also heard that there aren't many ticks in Texas due to their tiny legs, because of this most have drowned in the thick layers of b.s.
:rolleyes:

john pickett
2006-01-06, 11:34
Dropkick,
It's true there are few ticks in Texas (Home of a few good and one very good football team BTW). This is because they were greatly reduced in numbers by market hunters prior to the turn of the century and, sad to say, they haven't returned to thier previous numbers. Early explorers reported they moved in vast herds which reached from one horizon to the other; unlike those poor stunted specimens found in more northern-eastern-western states where they are commonly viewed as pests. :biggrin:

Seeker
2006-01-06, 14:10
regarding sulfur.

not sure i'd want to try it first, but an aviator buddy of mine (retired CW4, 1995-ish), told me they used to EAT powdered sulfur. something about a teaspoon a day keeps the ticks away... he claimed it worked. plenty of people have sulfur in their well water, so it can't be that harmful... still, i'll let someone else go first...

Hog On Ice
2006-01-06, 14:38
regarding sulfur.

not sure i'd want to try it first, but an aviator buddy of mine (retired CW4, 1995-ish), told me they used to EAT powdered sulfur. something about a teaspoon a day keeps the ticks away... he claimed it worked. plenty of people have sulfur in their well water, so it can't be that harmful... still, i'll let someone else go first...


humm - might not be too bad if you put it into some gel caps - that way you wouldn't taste it

Take-a-knee
2006-01-21, 01:51
Kleth:

I'm still looking for the permethrin concentration. I bought a quart of 36% permethrin and treated all of my outdoor clothing, googled up the concentration and wrote it down and now, apparently, have lost it. I promise to find it and post the info, it is a great way to keep the bugs at bay. It works on chiggers also (commercial chigger repellants use sulpher).

The US Army has used this stuff for years, there is a kit in the inventory for dumping into a 2-gallon sprayer and treating uniforms. Don't spray this stuff anywhere near any flowering plants, it won't hurt the plants but it will kill the honeybees who come to them for nectar.

As for snipers smelling of sulpher:
1) It was a SCHOOL
2) If you can hit a man from 600 meters, he'll never smell you.

KLeth
2006-01-23, 01:45
Cool, thank you Take-a-knee.
Don't spend too much time on googling the concentration, I can probably do that myself.

Yes! If somebody can smell you at 600 meters, you have a problem . . . :fisheye:

600meters is a nice shot - Never shot standard automatic rifle (.30) to more than 450meters myself.

<edit>
Found some concentrations :
Uniforms consisting of a shirt, an undershirt,
pants, socks, and hat were soaked in a solution
containing 15 mL of permethrin (Agr Evo, United
Kingdom; cis: transisomer ratio, 25:75) per 2L of
water for 2 minutes, then air dried for 4 hours.
This resulted in a permethrin concentration of
850 mg/m2 of clothing.
Source : http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache:Vngnt8KmtnsJ:www.sums.ac.ir/~ijms/27_4/172-175_Asilian.pdf+permethrin+impregnate+clothes&hl=en

Fite Bite 13.3% Permethrin Solution
This is a plastic bottle containing 8 fl oz (236 ml) of 13.3% Permethrin solution. This product is used to impregnate clothing with permethrin, for longer protection. Basically the 8oz of Fite Bite solution is added to a gallon of water in a basin or plastic bag. Using rubber gloves the clothes are kneaded in the mixture until the material is saturated, then left soaking for 10 minutes. The clothing is then removed allowed to drain and then dried.
Source : http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Health%20&%20Safety/Insect%20Repellents/Travel%20Medicine/Clifford%20R.%20Haynes/Final%20Report/
</edit>