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weekender
2005-12-31, 08:16
Im in the process of making my own potomac type (kickass quilts) under quilt as i had an old sleeping bag and decieded to use that as a starting point. But what i want to know is what if anything do you sleep in/under inside the hammock????

peter_pan
2005-12-31, 08:38
Routinely I use a top quilt... Lighter than sleeping bags....just throw it over yourself...no sleeping bag dance to get in it.... no zippers on the bag to wear/tear your hammock bottom when you use it "quilt style".

Pan

youngblood
2005-12-31, 09:48
Either quilts or sleeping bags will work fine. In general, the tradeoff is that quilts are more comfortable and sleeping bags are warmer. I've stayed with sleeping bags because I had bought expensive ones before I started hammocking. Most of the time I use my sleeping bags as a quilt because a quilt is more roomy, comfortable, easier to vent and easier to deal with in a hammock. I do occasionally have to reposition the zipper when I use a sleeping bag as a quilt, I know when because 'when' is when you are laying on it such that it is uncomfortable. If I get cold enough I will go to the trouble of actually getting in the bag so that I can cinch it up good... it is more trouble getting into a sleeping bag in a hammock, but it is warmer that way because a good sleeping bag is made to efficently close off air gaps so that you don't lose body heat easily each time you move and a sleeping bag with an integral hood does wonders when its cold.

weekender
2006-01-02, 15:10
Thanks for your replies but with an under quilt and a quilt(sleeping bag) inside that means your carrying two quilts. it was easy with a tent 1 tent, 1 sleeping bag and 1 pad/thermarest, now with a hammock it seems ive got to carry, hammock, under quilt, weathersheild and bag to sleep in, plus somewhere to keep my stuff when im asleep :confused:

Just Jeff
2006-01-02, 15:49
You only "need" the Weather Shield in very wet environments. The underquilt replaces the pad. The hammock/tarp replaces the tent. The top quilt replaces the bag. Clip your pack to the hammock support.

What else do you need to carry?

In all, you'll probably have about 8 oz more than a comparable lightweight setup.

peter_pan
2006-01-03, 08:11
Thanks for your replies but with an under quilt and a quilt(sleeping bag) inside that means your carrying two quilts. it was easy with a tent 1 tent, 1 sleeping bag and 1 pad/thermarest, now with a hammock it seems ive got to carry, hammock, under quilt, weathersheild and bag to sleep in, plus somewhere to keep my stuff when im asleep :confused:

Weekender,

Just Jeff's post is well said.

I would add that both of my quilts fit in a sack 7x7x12, This is much smaller than your bag and pad and I'll probably much lighter , at 40 oz for the three season quilt combo, or 29 oz for summer quilts. My Gossimer Gear G6 pack is one compartment of 1800 cu in and one exterior pocket... it easily handles my summer or three season loads, including food and water for a three day weekend...It will also handle a weekend two day, out and back....And all these configurations are with every thing inside the pack... We are frequently mistaken for day hikers with packs this small... my gear lists, by season for the Central AT, are included on my web site.

Hammocking really is a light and simple way to go...just different.... I encourage you to give it a thoughtful open minded review.

Pan

Seeker
2006-01-03, 13:15
Im in the process of making my own potomac type (kickass quilts) under quilt as i had an old sleeping bag and decieded to use that as a starting point. But what i want to know is what if anything do you sleep in/under inside the hammock????

i've got a Western Mountaineering Caribou 35* bag that i use as a quilt inside my hammock... i just zip the bottom up a few inches to make a footbox. i've had it down into the low 30s, maybe a little colder, but got inside then, because every time i moved, i got a shot of cold air. at that temp, i also used a pad inside the hammock. i was out last night and it was about 45*F. just used the bag and the JRB underquilt, and i was fine... can't speak for synthetic.

i'm into the hammock for what it does for my back, not for the weight benefits. a small tarp, cheap pad, ground cloth and mosquito net can be a little lighter, but not by much, and not enough to offset the convenience and comfort.

weekender
2006-01-06, 11:49
I see what your saying(?) and perhaps need to rethink my packing and have another few nights out to see how cold/hot i am at night, in different configurations. The reason i said about taking the weather shield out with me all the time is in the UK the weather is so changable i suppose i was thinking "what if" instead of why dont i use what i have already and see what happens, i suppose if the weather looks to raining hard i can lower the hammock and peg the tarp out closer to the ground. Definitly need some more nights out this year and really try what i have already.
Thanks

Seeker
2006-01-06, 14:20
just an update... i slept out again last night... same hammock, same underquilt, same bag, same hat, roughly the same overnight low temp (i have a thermometer hanging off the ridgeline)... and froze my a$$ off...

i wore a pair of socks, polypro underwear and top over a pair of cotton underwear and cotton t-shirt... i also used a wide blue foam pad with wings. and froze, like i said.

two nights ago, i wore no socks, no long top, and a pair of cotton underwear, cotton pajama bottoms, and cotton t-shirt, and a narrow, wingless blue foam pad, and was fine...

i don't understand... i added socks and long sleeves, and closer fitting pants, and what should have been a more-insulating pad, and froze... the temperature was only different by a couple degrees.

i'm guessing the more restrictive clothing, though 'warrm', actually decreased my circulation. that's the only reason i can think of... and i have no explanation for the foam pad's failure. they're both closed cell blue foam. the wider pad has more bubbles in it and seems to be slightly lighter than the other, but it's hard to tell. they're really just about the same, and considering the bulk of the insulation is the unchanged JRB underquilt, i don't know what to say...

anyone have any other ideas?

Just Jeff
2006-01-06, 14:23
Sometimes the underquilt's connections can slip down a bit if the hitch isn't squeezed tight enough, creating an air gap.

What you eat and when can also play an important role. Eating fatty, high calorie foods right before bed helps stoke the furnace...nuts, chocolate, etc.

Hydration can make a difference, too.

Any of these different for the cold night?

Hog On Ice
2006-01-06, 14:32
just an update... and froze my a$$ off...

anyone have any other ideas?

only the old standby ones (please excuse the dumb questions) - did you have a good fatty meal before hitting the hammock (long burning fuel for the inner furnace)? were you hydrated enough (this is a circulation question)? did you perhaps let yourself get cold before hitting the sack (exercise just before hitting the sack is good to warm up the bag)? were your socks at all damp (at very least I change my socks before hitting the sack but usually I sleep without socks if its cold)? any gaps between the underquilt and the hammock? were your shoulders protected with extra padding? did you use a hot water bottle/nalgene?

edit: dang it Jeff you beat me to it - I guess I need to type faster.

Iceman
2006-01-06, 20:45
Seeker, I agree with all here. When we winter snow camp, I have noticed a huge difference from one night to the next when you consider relative humidity, wind, caloric intake prior to bed, hydration etc... Even a one mile per hour breeze one night can freeze the bajeezez ( :biggrin: ) out of you, whereas the night before may have been calm. Too many variables.

youngblood
2006-01-08, 10:31
It can sometimes be hard to get a handle on things. Sometimes we get into what I've heard called the 'chilled to the bone mode' and it gets awful hard to ever get warm. I have that happen with my feet more often than with my torso, thank goodness.

Where in particular were you cold at? Top, bottom, butt, back, shoulders, etc. I know when I was doing some cold weather testing for pads in the SPE in my back yard where conditions were windless and in the high teens for consective nights all it would take sometimes was a minor adjustment to go from being chilled to being toasty. Sometimes all it took was a 5"x7" piece of 3/8" closed cell foam inside my sleeping bag/quilt underneath my heels, other times all it took was a plastic bag/vapor barrier vest between my t-shirt and long john tops and then other times all it took was a plastic bag/vapor barrier sock between liner socks and fleece sleeping socks. The point I'm trying to make is that sometimes if you can identify the problem more specifically, the solution is easy.

I routinely take that small piece of closed cell foam pad, I used it last winter when the wind shifted on me during the night when I was camped on what 'was' the leeward side of a mountain as compensation for wind penetration. I relocated it to the end of the footpocket of my sleeping bag/quilt because a 20+ mph wind was hammering me from that direction. Moving that small piece of pad to compensate for the high wind penetrating the foot of my bag helped alot, I wasn't warm and toasty but my feet were just cool instead of freezing.

Youngblood

Seeker
2006-01-09, 01:03
thanks for all the input, but i think i found the problem last night. :embarasse

food-my dinner was a little skimpy... some sort of oriental veggie thing my dear wife made (i will eat what is put in front of me, regardless of what i think of it. smart husband. she knows from whether or not i have seconds what my real opinion is... smart woman...) but it wasn't really 'filling'. so that could have been part of it.

socks-everything was dry... i just walked out of the house and hopped into the hammock...

youngblood- re: 'cold spot's- the second pad i used is shorter, and my feet tend to be a little colder using it, though the side wings on it keep the rest of me warmer. i have two squares of foam pad i use occassionally as 'extra' padding. using both foam pads and the two smaller squares, i took the hammock and underquilt into the mid-hi 30s one night a few months back (it can't be spring here already!) so, i know that technique. as a side sleeper, my feet are usually curled up so the shorter pad usually doesn't matter as much, though i think i was on my back most of the cold night. i was cold all over, not just in one spot. seemed like it was mostly my whole back/butt/upper thigh (but i'll explain what i think happened below). thanks for the input though... i didn't know a small piece of insulation could have that much effect, and i'm going to experiment some with my pack and waterproof liner/garbage bag for their effects as insulation.

i think the real problem was that i may have left the head end of the quilt too far open when i set it up, because i noticed it had a gap in it when my daughter climbed in to be my 'test dummy' (she hates the term) yesterday, while attempting to troubleshoot this on my own. i was surprised at the size of the gap, and think it was probably not much smaller with me in the hammock... i know the foot end was tight because i always do it up after i climb in, pulling all the drawstrings just about as tight as they go (not quite), vs pushing the whole thing aside and climbing in... i also make sure the last bit of velcro is fastened in the slit, holding that end firmly shut...

last night it was a lot warmer out, but i made sure i had the 'windows' closed and i was very toasty. thanks to ALL for your comments. as usual, they are most helpful, even when most of it was my own damn fault.

peter_pan
2006-01-10, 08:20
Seeker,

Glad that you figured "to close the windows"... In winter an open window will chill the whole room....

Don't forget that they open in the summer... That will be very helpful when it is 70 degrees or too cool for no insulation but too warm for the standard set up.... At that range an open window will cool the back of the neck and upper shoulders and still provide warmth to the lower back and vital organs...

Pan