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FranceyS
2006-01-24, 23:22
Hi everybody! Just thought I'd introduce myself. This is the 2nd introduction I've written. I hit an unwanted key on the first one, and the message disappeared, so don't know if it will post, so there might be two of them.

I don't know if I'm out of my league...This might be an all Male Forum, since I haven't read much of anything from the 'fairer sex' in the various subjects. <smile> Camping does attract a lot of different genders, and Hopefully, my writing will encourage other ladies to write in and tell their experiences too. For variety, you know.

I live fairly near Sergeant Rock...in beautiful East Tennessee. He's in Marysville and I'm in Knoxville.

Hiking: A neat sport, yes? I hike every single day with my best friend and companion. We do three+ miles every single day, excepting downpours.
Don't laugh! I know that 3+ miles a day doesn't sound like much, but Gee, Guys, when you multiply 3 X 365 you get 1095 miles a year. Doesn't that sound kind of impressive? For a lady? I'm sure you Guys do twice that, judging from the extraordinary hikes I've read in this forum. Oh! By the way, my best friend is of 'mixed color' - black and white - an Australian Herder dog, called Blue Heelers in this 'neck of the woods'. Her name is Pooks. Last week she was attacked in the Park, right at my feet, by two other dogs being walked in the Park, and poor Pooks got the worst of it. But, that's another story. <smile>

I want to particularly mention about the stone axe one member found.
What a lucky find. How very nice of that member to share the find with others, and than donate it to a place where many more can view it and even touch it. I would never have recognized it for what it was....BUT, from now on I will. I'll take a new look at any odd rock I see from here on in. Those pictures were worth a thousand words. And the other Member who found two such ancient artifacts. I'd love to see a picture of them, too.

Anyway, just wanted to introduce myself. I hope I'm welcome because I believe I might have questions that need answering from 'those in the know' since I bought myself and Pooks a new hammock.
Bye for now. FranceyS

KLeth
2006-01-25, 01:29
I've actually never seen HikingHQ as a "all-male" forum - And it isn't! E.g. Rosaleen is giving out good replies. Of course here is a lot of "stove-DIY" and military talk, but I think you'll find answers or good advice regarding most hiking and hammock issues.

BTW I'm not a hammock user!

dropkick
2006-01-25, 02:09
Hey FranceyS,
Welcome aboard.

3 miles a day is nothing to sneer at. I'd be very happy if I could get that much in. Weather and open time hasn't been kind lately though.

I hike with my better half, her name is Jamee, and she's a lab/hound cross that I found at the humane society.
Haven't tried her with a hammock yet. But I will this spring. Don't know how it is going to work out as she sleeps with me and doesn't like it if there isn't some form of body contact (abandomnent issues maybe?).
She is currently sleeping with her head on my foot (normal computer mode).
I am going to try loading her into the hammock with me. ????
May end up going back to tarp camping.

Iceman
2006-01-25, 03:50
Here is our trail buddy on an overnighter last February in the snow. Waking up in the tent in the morning and snuggling with my daughter. (And before anyone gets real cute, my daughter has the blond hair you schmucks...) :biggrin: The dog is a pound pooch we have had since we rescued him from the shelter, he is now approaching 17yrs old this spring.

Rosaleen
2006-01-25, 03:54
Well, thanks for the complliment, KLeth!

Francey, DixieCritter, Sgt Rock's wife also posts, so you don't need to feel alone here.

KLeth- I forgive you for not having converted to the saved (from the night terrors of ground sleeping!) hammock faithful. !-)

Rosaleen

dixicritter
2006-01-25, 08:13
Francey, DixieCritter, Sgt Rock's wife also posts, so you don't need to feel alone here.

Rosaleen

That's true I do. :D

Welcome Francey.

FranceyS
2006-01-25, 11:51
Good Morning:
Thank you for the Welcome.

About ten days ago, I was ‘lurking’ on a motor home site and someone wrote in about the Hennessey Hammock. Well, curiosity got the better of me, and I ‘tuned in’ to Hennessey’s website. After reading the information sitewise, I was sold! What fun! I ordered one.

Now, common sense tells me: Where and when am I going to use this neat contraption? I need a sleeping hammock like I need another bed. You can only sleep in one place at a time and I have a Queen bed in the MH and 3 beds in my house. I motor home mostly, but after 8 years, that’s gotten kinda’ ‘old’, because wherever you drive to, the M.H. is so much like home, that you feel you haven’t been anywhere -- but your wallet is somewhat lighter. <smile>

If you travel alone (with Pooks) as I do, at any M.H. park, being buddy-buddy with the next site occupant isn’t too interesting...they are generally family folks who don’t need the company of singles, because you really don’t have anything in common. I Joined a lot of the Single’s Rallies and they were pretty nice, good company, good eating - but no one ever did anything ever, but eat and sit, a perfect recipe for ‘fat’. <smile> In all the rallies I attended, I was the ONLY one who every day hiked the trails with Pooks.

And, by yourself, with a water bottle and a dog leash in strange Parks, ( I generally left my Beretta in the M.H.), and on thinking about it afterward, Whew! I was taking a gamble! In Alabama, just before sunset, I was returning from a ‘goodly’ hike and Pooks started seriously barking at something ahead, but she wouldn’t leave my side. It was almost dark by this time, and as I got closer it actually appeared to be a wild boar. When I got even closer, I found that it WAS a HUGE wild boar with tusks and it stood there about 30’ away staring at me with it’s tiny eyes. Not knowing what to do or where to turn, being unfamiliar with that Park, and it being now dark, and heart beating wildly, and Pooks really insanely barking and pulling at the leash, I just stopped dead in my tracks. After what seemed like minutes, the enormous critter turned away and trotted off into the woods. When I got back inside my cozy warm M.H. I lifted a glass of wine at dinner to my luck at not being attacked, as male boars are commonly known to do. (This I read afterwards.)

Your response to my initial message is heartwarming. It looks like there is a possibility that I might be able to use my new sleeping hammock around friends who have similar hammocks, and I won’t feel ‘out of place’. Now, that’s something to look forward to. Bye for now. FranceyS

Seeker
2006-01-25, 14:53
hi francey, and welcome. i used to live and work in knoxville... lived off the end of ebenezer road, in farmington, where it hits northshore drive... worked all over knoxville, mostly out in farragut... nice town... i miss the smokies...

most of us here are formerly military, but that means we have nice manners and say 'yes ma'am' and 'no, sir'...(yeah, right!) but we do get a lot of different posters here, females included... dixiecritter and rosaleen have been mentioned... kea's another, and, though she's been gone awhile, titanium hiker is here too. btw... anyone heard from her lately?

lots of hammock hangers here, along with plenty of good advice...

again, welcome...

FranceyS
2006-01-26, 11:38
KLeth: You were right. This Forum is a mixed forum. I'm so glad. I already feel comfortable chatting with you all.
By the way: I see you are in Denmark. Whoo! Far Away. My father's family came from the Lulea section of Sweden.
Cold country!

Dropkick: How nice to hear that others hike with their 4-legged companions. Regarding Jamee being able to sleep with you in the hammock. On setting up my new one-- For the heck of it, I invited Pooks to jump in with me. She declined. <smile> It was too new to her...but, just let the sound of a distant thunder-boomer be heard and she'd be in my lap, in the hammock with me, in a split second. <smile> If the lower entry were closed, she'd leap upon the upper netting to be close. She thinks I can protect her from the thunder and lightening. She's very sensitive to electrical changes in the air and will let me know when a storm is 30 minutes away. If the electric in the house shuts down, even for a second, she's at my feet in an instant.

That brings up a question for all: When tucked all comfy and cozy in the Hennessy Hammock and a thunder storm comes up, do you stay in it and 'tough it out'? The rule of storms is to NEVER be under a tree. And, The wind during a storm can be pretty wild. What about falling limbs and such? If a limb crashed you and the hammock to the ground, how in the world would you get out, what with the bottom entry in such an unusual place. Any stranger that might want to help wouldn't know how to access you? Of course, tearing through the netting would be the only alternative, I guess. Any body here worried about such an event happening? Have you ever been out in it in a storm?

Iceman: What a charming picture of your daughter and the family Pooch. Thanks for sharing it. I see you are in a tent.
I had read numerous inferences here and there on this site regarding tents as not being as useful as the HHammock. One must keep in mind that I've never been tent camping before, so tenting would be a new experience (as is the HHammock.) However, I'm ready for new experiences...<smile>

I went down to the local Sporting/Camping store and looked at the wildly expensive, ultra-light tents hanging here, there, and everywhere and the more I looked the more confused I became. I'm not going to hang off the peak of a mountain, or sleep in the remote wilds of Canada, or snuggle into a snowdrift in Alaska, so my needs would be kind of ordinary--more like driving in with a trailer full of camping equipment and setting up 20' from the car. I know, I know...that's not ROUGHING IT! <smile>

On perusing the net with all the Model names and such I determined that a medium sized 2-4 person tent would be nice. The pricey-store was having a 20% off sale and I was tempted, but decided to wait a bit. Then I happened to browse the Sports Section of Target's Super Store, and there sitting all by itself, on sale, at 50% off, was just what I'd had in mind. How could I pass that up? I bought it. Perhaps you are thinking to yourself. "If she bought a sleeping HHammock, why would she need a tent"? Well, you see, being a lady, when it comes to changing clothes I'd need some kind of cover to feel comfortable. When it rains all day when camping, you need a place to play cards, chat, etc.

Rosaleen and DixieCritter: Thank you for the welcome. I'm glad to see there are vocal ladies in the background.

Seeker: How interesting that you used to live about 12 miles from where I live. Northshore Drive is 1/2 mile from me.
When I saw that our good SGT lives 25 minutes away I couldn't help but think, "What a small world we live in."
Bye for now. FranceyS

blackdog
2006-01-26, 12:50
Far Away. My father's family came from the Lulea section of Sweden.
Cold country!

A cold country? Nah... I'm roughly three hours drive from Luleå, and it's only 1.8C here. ;)

FranceyS
2006-01-26, 13:16
BlackDog: Lapland, Sweden!...What a coincidence! When visiting Sweden some years ago we treked up to the Lapland Country. As we were driving you could see herds and herds of reindeer. We stopped and befriended a Laplander who had a huge reindeer herd. We got to chatting, and he gave me a beautiful set of reindeer antlers to take back to the USA as a souvenier. We were worried about whether the airline or the US customs would allow the antlers into the country, but it did. I had them mounted, and it's on a wall in my home. And, it looks like I was right...IT IS COLD there. <smile>

I was certainly impressed by the cleanliness of Sweden, no matter where we went. It was my understanding that it was the law to pick up any fallen timber and litter... and as a result, the forests were beautiful and uncluttered. While there, a relative who was a real craftsman (as I hear
due to the bitter cold Winters, most all Scandanavian people are great craftsmen), presented me with a hand-made beautifully carved wooden butter paddle. I cherish it. What a nice surprise to speak with someone
in a place so far away in Lapland, that I can visualize, since I've been there before. And, that you are only 3 hours from Lulea. My father's family name was STROM.

Just out of curiosity, do you have a Hennessey Hammock, and do you ever sleep out in it while mountaineering? If so, I imagine you might get a bit of frostbite on your toes...<smile> Bye. Francey

blackdog
2006-01-26, 18:51
BlackDog: Lapland, Sweden!...What a coincidence! When visiting Sweden some years ago we treked up to the Lapland Country. As we were driving you could see herds and herds of reindeer. We stopped and befriended a Laplander who had a huge reindeer herd. We got to chatting, and he gave me a beautiful set of reindeer antlers to take back to the USA as a souvenier. We were worried about whether the airline or the US customs would allow the antlers into the country, but it did. I had them mounted, and it's on a wall in my home. And, it looks like I was right...IT IS COLD there. <smile>
Reindeer is cattle here, sort of. It's good fur and it's good meat. (Those facts shock american children who keep thinking about Rudolph & Co, but it's still true). We need to drive carefully to avoid colliding with them on dark winter roads. The balance between old ways and new are constantly being debated here. But Lapland is a better trademark for the tourist industry than Sweden (The land of the Laplanders is divided in four parts, the norwegian, swedish, finnish and the russian, if you wonder). That industry is also an important part of the economy and heritage, too important to be ignored. We have hi-tech medical companies and diamond-makers and gold mines and wild life adventures crammed into the equivalent to one state. It's exciting and difficult at the same time. Wonderful and problematic. I guess that's why i like living where i live. It's so easy to sense time here, where the ancient meets the future, and yet so difficult to comprehend. Soothing in a challenging way. The combination... well, i hope you all get to experience it somewhere, i really do.

The temperature was actually 1.8 degrees below (-1.8C not 1.8C) but that's not really cold. A couple of weeks ago we had a few days of -30C, which is more normal. Roughly two degrees below and full sunshine is nice after that. People act as if spring is early and fall in love, almost. It's hard to describe to someone that hasn't seen it, trust me. This winter is the warmest since the accurate recording of thermal history began in the 17th century, btw.


I was certainly impressed by the cleanliness of Sweden, no matter where we went. It was my understanding that it was the law to pick up any fallen timber and litter... and as a result, the forests were beautiful and uncluttered.
We have some very unusual laws here. There's not a law to pick things up, but our rules give us the right to go almost everywhere, as long as we take care of things. Read about the right of public access (http://www.allemansratten.se/templates/firstPage.asp?id=2058) and judge for yourself. You've already seen the results. But there are also other reasons for the clean outdoors. A long campaign of "keep things clean" and the fact that most forrests are seen as slow-growing crops, all add to the effect.


While there, a relative who was a real craftsman (as I hear
due to the bitter cold Winters, most all Scandanavian people are great craftsmen), presented me with a hand-made beautifully carved wooden butter paddle. I cherish it.
It's not the bitter cold that makes people here craftsmen, it's the LONG winter nights. You can always dress for the low temperatures, but waiting is hard.


What a nice surprise to speak with someone
in a place so far away in Lapland, that I can visualize, since I've been there before. And, that you are only 3 hours from Lulea. My father's family name was STROM.
This part of Sweden isn't very densely populated, but there's still a lot of people here. And while there's not that many Ströms here, there's enough of them not to know the right one... Ström means "stream" (or electricity), btw. My brother had one in his class the first nine grades, but it would be a superduperlucky shot if she's related to your family somehow. But who knows? Sweden also has one of the best environments for genealogical research on the planet... If you like such things and have swedish relatives then this is the place to be.


Just out of curiosity, do you have a Hennessey Hammock, and do you ever sleep out in it while mountaineering? If so, I imagine you might get a bit of frostbite on your toes... :)
No, i have no hammock right now. ...it's in the mail... can't wait to get it (HH explorer deluxe a-sym) here. (No, i'm not a 300 pounder, i got it as a birthday gift). Not for mountaineering either as i live in the woodlands, and no, i wouldn't sleep outside this time of the year. I'm a computer guy, not a yeti. ;) My hands go cold easily but my feet are warm. So i guess the first things to get a frostbite are my fingers. Probably a carpal tunnel related thing. I have good gloves. And (as seen in another thread) there's some new winter footwear being created. The HH will have to wait for warmer weather. I will have to adjust myself to it before i even think about leaving for longer journeys.

The cold weather also gives a hint to why swedish women are so hot-blooded. I'm married to one and like it a lot...

Iceman
2006-01-26, 19:11
FranceyS, yes, we are tent folk. I am not an ultra lightweight hiker, not yet anyway. My wife and I used to hike the Pacific Crest trail here before kids (b.k.), and most all of these hikes involved tents. I have relied on a bunch of different tents for myself for various different styles of outings. Solo hikes, two to four person overnighters, car camping, hunting, and overnight backcountry snow camping. Each requiring (well not really requiring, but justifying the purchase...) a different tent. Many a wet rainy night spent in these tents. I have yet to consider a hammock, primarily due to my inexperience with them, but also to my size. Although, some here have assured me that there is a hammock for me, I have yet to go down this path.

It is nice to read your posts. A single woman who likes the outdoors, likes dogs, and occasionally packs a gun is alright with me! :biggrin:

I look forward to reading more of your posts. Welcome! Welcome! Welcome!

I thought I better throw in a couple of extra "welcomes", since I sort of got in a little trouble around here, chasing a new poster away a while back.

KLeth
2006-01-27, 01:51
I'm a computer guy, not a yeti. ;) My hands go cold easily but my feet are warm. So i guess the first things to get a frostbite are my fingers. That is an occupational problem . . . . . I have the same problem thus I look like the yeti :fisheye:

peter_pan
2006-01-27, 10:12
I'm sure this may sound chauvanistic but....

To me and a lot of the vetrans I've served with, and probably to the many vets here, the women of our lives are a major reminder everyday of why we served or fought...

Welcome to a great site... Post away...A fresh perspective/ question is as welcome as a day in the fresh air hiking.

Pan

FranceyS
2006-01-27, 11:25
Good Morning, All:
BlackDog: I converted the celsius to fahrenheit and you are right! It's not that cold in your area: 1.8c = 35.24 deg. -1.8c = 28.75. It was 30 degrees here this morning at my house...not too much different from the Lapland Country. Amazing. I thought it would be way lower than that. Maybe you wouldn't freeze your toes after all. <smile>

That was a truly interesting writeup on Lapland. When I was up there heading for the Artic Circle, the woman who had invited me to tour that portion of the country was a resident of Sweden and knew the history. When we stopped to chat with the
Laplander who owned that big herd, later she told me that he was probably worth a million dollars due to the extensive herd he owned. One thinks of country people as not being wealthy, and it sure brought me up smart, and like you said, a balance between the 'old' and the 'new', 'wonderful and problematic'. .

That Right of Public Access was interesting reading too. And, obviously, it's strenuously enforced, because the countryside was enjoyably clean and pleasant to drive through.

Thank you for clarifying that darkness vs cold reason for the superb craftsmanship of the Scandanavians. I had forgotten that you only experience a few hours of daylight the further north you go, and Lapland is pretty farrrrr North..

How wonderful that you should be receiving your new HHammock soon. Happy belated Birthday greetings.

Regarding your cold hands/warm heart...<smile> I read on this Forum, by one of the members, that cold hands and extremities are possibly caused by the 'core temperature' (chest and heart) cooling off and shunting the blood from the fingers/legs back to the heart area. It was suggested that the way to counter this is to wear additional warmup clothing over the chest area like an additional down vest, etc, which keeps the heart area warm enough so as not to restrict blood flow to the extremities. The other day while sitting at the computer my legs got chilly so I followed the advice and put on a down vest and sure enough, within 20 minutes I felt warmer. I thought that was pretty neat advice.

I'm glad to hear you are happily married...<smile>

===============
ICEMAN: Thank you for your numerous welcomes. This is a terrific site, it's so well set up and easy to post to. I believe it is the best Forum set-up I've been on as to ease of finding material and making changes, etc.
===============
PETERPAN: Thank you for the nice comment. It's nice to feel welcome.
===============

Bye for Now. FranceyS

Seeker
2006-01-27, 12:08
I thought I better throw in a couple of extra "welcomes", since I sort of got in a little trouble around here, chasing a new poster away a while back.

yeah, but you were obviously having a really rough week... not acting at all like the iceman we know and love...

Iceman
2006-01-27, 23:04
xxx ooo xxx

dixicritter
2006-01-28, 00:27
Iceman you did good this time. Now where's the real Iceman??? What have you done with him?? ;) :laugh:

incognito
2006-01-28, 15:40
:biggrin: WELCOME!!!!!!!!!!

FranceyS

I've read your posts several times.

When I look at posts I can SEE what people say.

When I look at yours it's as if I can HEAR what you say.

Why is that, are you a Whisperer? :)

Just Kidding----------Welcome

dropkick
2006-01-28, 17:23
That brings up a question for all: When tucked all comfy and cozy in the Hennessy Hammock and a thunder storm comes up, do you stay in it and 'tough it out'? The rule of storms is to NEVER be under a tree. And, The wind during a storm can be pretty wild. What about falling limbs and such? If a limb crashed you and the hammock to the ground, how in the world would you get out, what with the bottom entry in such an unusual place. Any stranger that might want to help wouldn't know how to access you? Of course, tearing through the netting would be the only alternative, I guess. Any body here worried about such an event happening? Have you ever been out in it in a storm?

Bye for now. FranceyS

I'm from what is mainly evergreen country so I don't worry tremendously about falling limbs.

Though I have inherited a worry about falling limbs when I'm around cottonwoods as one tried to kill my entire family shortly before I was born.
-Widow maker broke off of the tree on a sunny, slightly windy day and landed on my Dad. Just missed my pregnant Mom and my Brother. Put my Dad in the hospital for quite awhile.

Anyway this is a longwinded way of saying that I wouldn't even sit under a tree that I had worries about, and I always look at the limbs on deciduous (sp?) -leafy- trees before venturing under them.
Would still tie to them though, if I felt comfortable with the trees.

Been in lots of storms (though not in hammock) and I worry more about lightning. But as long as you aren't under an isolated tree, or by one of the tallest trees in the area it isn't that great a risk either.

I tarp camped for years, and tent camped before that. Just trying out hammock camping.
Made a hammock this winter and am looking forward to spring.
-Going to ease into cold weather hammock camping, so no winter camping yet.

I have always carried hammocks with me when I'm family camping or using a campground, but for some reason never thought to use them while hiking until I became a member of this site.
...Though it could be because I've been making my own hammocks for years and I made them from heavy canvas with no insulation under them. Did have a tarp overhead for sun and rain though.

SowthEfrikan
2006-01-29, 10:24
Hi Francey

I'm relatively new - joined recently after reading this board for a long, long time - but don't take hiking as seriously as some. It's fun and leisure for the weekends, traveling as lightly as possible without sacrificing too much comfort. I love being outdoors, but not to the extent I have to conquer peaks or prove I can survive with just a matchstick. :biggrin: Let's face it, I hike like a girrrrl!

You are going to love your Hennessy. I use it in the warm months but found it too cold in winter even in the Texas climate, so am intrigued by the newly-invented quilt that goes under it. What a fantastic idea, and I read about it first right here on hikinghq.

I've just poured through Backpacker Mag's latest gear review and believe I have spotted my new pack. Life IS good.

I'm lucky enough to have found a group that loves hiking and through them discovered REI. I left all my gear behind when I moved to the US, and had to start over again, but it's been great. All those clever new goodies to play with. Yes, I adore gear.

Although I've been taking to the woods, as it were, since about 1985, I spotted The Complete Walker IV last weekend and thumbed through it. What a lekker book, full of common sense, insight and humour, on it's way to a bookshelf beside me soon.

Anyway, enough rambling. Enjoy Hikinghq!

FranceyS
2006-01-29, 14:07
Good Morning, All

INCOGNITO: Thank you for the kind remarks and the welcome. How nice that you belong
to nature. Northern Illinois, where you live, is also COLD country...and talk about wind!
With 23 lbs on your back, and bent into the wind.... Whoo! That's a real hike!

===============
DROPKICK: That is frightening, the limbs falling on your Father. And, I can understand it.
Here in East Tennessee, we don't get wind often, excepting in mid-Winter & early Spring, and during thunder-boomers. The woods in back of my home, every time there is a blow, my paths are littered with fallen branches, some small... some not so small. That's what made me worry about being in the HH during a storm, as you have to hook up to two adjacent trees and between them, there is no choice but to be UNDER them.

Even in the tent, the same problem would arise, but as you suggested, if you stay out from
under trees where it might be a problem, it's pretty safe. I'll keep that in mind when pitching
my 'new tent'.

Here's a question, regarding tents: Can some sort of lightening device be simply installed
in or on the tent to deflect any lightening strikes? In a building, the building itself has a strong tendency to deflect lightening...not in every case, of course, but in most instances it will be
attracted to something in or around the building. In tents, one appears to be a 'sitting duck'
for something like that. I'm sure that if a storm were severe enough, me and Pooks would
head for the car to wait it out. I'm not as scared as Pooks is of storms, but I guess I'm a close 'second'... I try to be brave for her sake. <smile>

My daughter and her family were in a Pop-Up down in North Carolina when a very severe
storm came up. They told me that the Pop-Up tent sides and body were shaking, popping and ballooning so loudly, they put both the children on the floor and lay on top of them, all of them being just terrified. At the end of the storm,
upon venturing outside, they found all the other Pop-Ups and Tents in their vicinity were on their sides or upside down.... only theirs managed to stay upright... and there were branches down all over the place ...that's how severe the storm was.

How interesting that you make your own hammocks. Perhaps you can post a picture of the
new hammock you have made... you know that old saying about a picture being worth a
thousand words.. <smile> . This is such a great site and I have learned so much from reading the Posts and viewing the pictures.
==================

SOWTHEFRIKAN: Whoo! What an interesting handle. I gather you are lately from South Africa? Are you an expat?.. that you had to leave all your camping/hiking gear behind when you left? If so, I bet you have an interesting story to tell. Can you share it?

I'll have to check with the Library to see if they have any of the reading material that you mention. Sounds like good recommendations.

Bye for now. FranceyS

blackdog
2006-01-29, 16:33
Regarding your cold hands/warm heart... :) I read on this Forum, by one of the members, that cold hands and extremities are possibly caused by the 'core temperature' (chest and heart) cooling off and shunting the blood from the fingers/legs back to the heart area.
It works, as you've noticed. Knowing how the body works could be advantageous, like in this case, but it could also be a matter of life and death. Situations could become severe very quickly wherever you are, so having the knowhow is more or less a must. In my case a nerve goes through a tighter than usual passage in my wrist. My brain believes my hands are getting more blood than they are. I compensate by wearing thicker gloves. ;)

The fact still remains: If your hands get more heat from the blood stream then your heart stays cooler. The opposite is also true. It's an old saying, i know, but not all old sayings are false...

Just Jeff
2006-01-29, 21:54
This is also why a shot or two of alcohol can make you feel warmer in cold weather.

Alcohol increases blood flow in the extremities, especially close to the skin. Ever notice how drunk people often look flushed? So if your core is warm (and you know you'll stay that way, for example by being bundled up in camp), taking a shot or two can warm up your extremities.

KLeth
2006-01-30, 02:01
Here's a question, regarding tents: Can some sort of lightening device be simply installed in or on the tent to deflect any lightening strikes? . . . . . In tents, one appears to be a 'sitting duck' for something like that. I'm sure that if a storm were severe enough, me and Pooks would
head for the car to wait it out. I'm not as scared as Pooks is of storms, but I guess I'm a close 'second'... I try to be brave for her sake. I'm a "tent'er" :) but I've never heard of any lightning lightning conductor for tents, also it would be pretty bad, since it would be hard to earth it properly.
It's mostly a matter of intelligent tenting, weather forecasts and a bit of weather knowledge/intuition. E.g. if storm is comming, never tent on bare high ground, or directly under trees.

A little more than two years ago, my better half and I were tenting in the highlands of Lappland and we were hit by a storm. Even though our tent were in the lee of small hils and scrubbery, the updraft generated by the surroundings, made our tent hop and dance. The tent stood its ground, but since the storm were growing we decided to make a controlled disengagement. Without having slept for more than one hour we hiked another 8 hours on nothing but water, rolled oats and a few biscuits - A few times my better half were thrown to the ground by the wind and I had to use a lot of my energy to keep her going until we reached lowlands that were in lee of the mountains.

We will never know if we did the right, but we belive that we tent would have survived the storm, but at that time we were'nt certain. Since then we have bought serveral types of tent-pegs. Sand-pegs, rock-pegs and square-pegs.
It's important to have the right pegs for the right surface.
Of course we also have a fantastic tent, the "Helsport Börgefjell Light 3 Camp".

http://www.bimseland.dk/Telt.jpg

dropkick
2006-01-30, 02:44
Here's a question, regarding tents: Can some sort of lightening device be simply installed
in or on the tent to deflect any lightening strikes? In a building, the building itself has a strong tendency to deflect lightening...not in every case, of course, but in most instances it will be
attracted to something in or around the building. In tents, one appears to be a 'sitting duck'
for something like that. I'm sure that if a storm were severe enough, me and Pooks would
head for the car to wait it out. I'm not as scared as Pooks is of storms, but I guess I'm a close 'second'... I try to be brave for her sake. <smile>

My daughter and her family were in a Pop-Up down in North Carolina when a very severe
storm came up. They told me that the Pop-Up tent sides and body were shaking, popping and ballooning so loudly, they put both the children on the floor and lay on top of them, all of them being just terrified. At the end of the storm,
upon venturing outside, they found all the other Pop-Ups and Tents in their vicinity were on their sides or upside down.... only theirs managed to stay upright... and there were branches down all over the place ...that's how severe the storm was.


I can't think of any type of device that wouldn't make things worse instead of better. Any type of lightning rod would attract lightning.
Lightning follows the easiest path to the ground, so if you are in a tent, the safest place to be is in the middle, away from the walls and on top of some form of insulation (closed cell pad, nylon tarp, etc.). If lightning hits the tent it will hopefully travel down the (wet) walls and to the ground without going through the interior.

Ignoring branches-
The safest place to be during a lightning storm, except in your car, is amongst a large stand of trees. You don't want to be the tallest thing around (or near it) and you don't want to be exposed.
If you are in a field you should cover up, and make yourself as small (short) as possible. Don't ever take cover with the tallest thing around, either tree or rock. (also drop and move away from any large metal objects you might have with you - aluminum hiking poles, external frame pack, etc.)

Your daughter was dealing with wind, if there had been a way for the wind to travel in and out of her tent balancing the pressures it most likely would not have ballooned and made all the noise. When the wind travels over the curved surface of the tent it creates lower pressure outside (like the top of an airplane wing) and the inside pressure tries to push it's way out. Variations in the pressures make the walls snap in and out.
-It's like a house in a hurricane, they recommend leaving windows open so the pressures can equalize.

Iceman
2006-01-30, 02:53
This is also why a shot or two of alcohol can make you feel warmer in cold weather.

Alcohol increases blood flow in the extremities, especially close to the skin. Ever notice how drunk people often look flushed? So if your core is warm (and you know you'll stay that way, for example by being bundled up in camp), taking a shot or two can warm up your extremities.

I agree. And to help compensate for this added heat loss from vasodilation, when we snow camp, we drink heated alcohol drinks.Yummy! Warm up some Spiced wine, some dry "hard" salami, brie' and mango chutney, all on a hard roll, sounds good to me! Heck, why wait until I am snowcamping, I think I will head for the fridge right now... :eating:

Actually, we have found that you can rev up your metabilism and generate more heat by eating some high fat foods when in the extreme cold. The snack I quoted above is "loaded" and seems to work for us when around our snowcamp each year. Usually we are quite warm as we stomp :elefant: our camp area firm, set up our tent, build a snow shelter and dig in our kitchen... but after dark, sitting around the camp and enjoying the solitude of the winter wonderland around us, we can get a chill. My hands run pretty hot, but my wife gets the cold toes, and cold hands, and her first time snow camping she actually took my advice (for once) and put on a vest, had a bit of wine, and a fatty snack, and after a short bit, her hands and feet warmed up.

Hydration is also a concern in these conditions. Dehydration of the body from respiration, perspiration, and increased urination associated with alcohol consumption can elevate your risk of hypothermia.. I have read that one should (obviously) minimize the amount of alcohol one consumes in extreme cold (duh). We enjoy some warmed wine and other spirits but also are sure to include other warmed drinks when in cold conditions. Some of our favorites are: cocoa, hot apple cider, chia tea, and hot jello. We try also to limit the caffeine, since this can constrict the vessels, reducing blood flow to the extremities. Very important to avoid dehydration. If you are peeing bright yellow, and not very often, you aint drinking enough. Most hikers in cold conditions do not have as much of a desire to drink fluids, as they would in warmer temperatures. One should be sure to force the issue. Drink more water!

Sidenote; most all of your hangover :beerglass :vollkomme from that party you got smashed at are the result of dehydration. One of the best remedies for a hangover that I have read about (and experienced) is to drink a ton of water. Before bed, middle of the night, and in the morning. Dehydration= problems for your body.

dropkick
2006-01-30, 02:58
How interesting that you make your own hammocks. Perhaps you can post a picture of the new hammock you have made... you know that old saying about a picture being worth a thousand words.. <smile> . This is such a great site and I have learned so much from reading the Posts and viewing the pictures.

Oops.
Meant to say something about this last post but got called away in the middle of answering and forgot.
Don't have a digital. Was hoping for one for x-mas but got other things instead.
Going to have to bite the bullet and buy one myself.
....hmmm... my b-day is approaching though....

Would be happy to give you a written description if you want it (might even throw in some badly drawn computer sketchs).

Just Jeff
2006-01-30, 10:47
...set up our tent...

What is this "tent" thing you speak of? Is it comfortable like a hammock?

Haha...j/k. I like hot jello, too. Except once all I had in the pantry was pistaccio pudding jello and I didn't want to go to the store, so I packed it. Now THAT was the worst thing I've ever had on a camping trip. I had to dump out the last few swallows.

Best hot jello I've drunk was raspberry...good stuff.

Iceman
2006-01-31, 01:18
This tent I speak of is a necessity in my case, camping in the snow, with family and dog in tow... Comfy, yes, especially when the wind starts blowing a bit of snow up...


Besides, when snow camping, you do not want to be under a tree... Too much falling snow and branches. Far better to camp out in the open, build a snow wall to direct wind off of the tent. You all really need to try this! Dig in a hole at the door to hang your feet into...

I am dragging the family out this weekend to enjoy the snow. Just checked a telemtry site, and the area we will be camping in has approximately 70" of snow. :arty: Wha' whoo! Should be 80"+ by this weekend! Maybe I will post a picture or two....

dropkick
2006-01-31, 01:47
What is this "tent" thing you speak of? Is it comfortable like a hammock?

Haha...j/k. I like hot jello, too. Except once all I had in the pantry was pistaccio pudding jello and I didn't want to go to the store, so I packed it. Now THAT was the worst thing I've ever had on a camping trip. I had to dump out the last few swallows.

Best hot jello I've drunk was raspberry...good stuff.
Uhhh.... The pistachio pudding jello was pistachio pudding made by the Jello corp. I don't think I'd like hot pudding either.

(Jello isn't actually a product, it's the name of a company that makes gelitin deserts and pudding - i.e. Kleenex, Xerox)

But if you take the pistachio pudding, let it set up, and then mix in pineapple, baby marshmallows, coconut, whip cream, and walnuts it tastes really good.
Plain it bites.

FranceyS
2006-02-01, 00:05
BLACKDOG I'm with you when it comes to thicker gloves. My fingers get coldest first when out in bitter cold weather. I am going to try the down vest hint again the next time we get a real cold spell and I'm hiking with Pooks. So far, it hasn't been cold enough to freeze fingers here. Odd Winter, but it isn't over yet... We have February to get through.

JUST JEFF That's interesting that a bit of alcohol will warm the hands and feet. Makes sense.
I'm with you about that Pistachio Pudding... especially as a drink... (yuck!)

KLETH What a frightening experience you and your wife had with the storm up in the Highlands.
Any wind that throws a person to the ground is a terrific blow! Reminds me of Chicago! <smile>
What a good-looking tent, that Helsport.

DROPKICK That's good advice for when in a thunder storm. And, we do get a lot of them here in the late Winter and early Spring... and Summer. I bet if my daughter and family had thought to open some of the window areas in the pop-up as you suggested, they might have stopped all that frightening clatter. Perhaps not having something open caused the many popups around them to capsize, as the air had no place to go. Good thinking. I'll tell my daughter and husband about this. They have since gotten themselves a lovely trailer, graduating from the pop-up, and I would suppose the same theory holds true for trailers...have something open to even the pressure during a storm. Good advice.. So, your birthday is February 17.....Hope you get that camera. And, yes, I'd like a
written description of your hand-made hammock. They seem easy to make, but I'm sure they are really not easy at all. I would think the biggest trick is putting the ends together. Not that I plan to make a hammock anytime soon... I have enough to do building a camping environment around the hammock I just bought. <smile> What started out as about 12 pounds has now turned into
about 30 pounds.... And I haven't even figured in food or clothing. Well, I never did mean to be an 'ultra-light' or even a 'light' camper.. I wonder..Now, don't laugh... do they have wheeled ultra-light carts for carting stuff to wherever one hikes? Hey, I asked you, don't laugh! Just think how easy it would be to trail along a
lightweight cart holding all your heavy 'stuff'. When I came back from Sweden, I had along one of those carts that I'd made into a carry cart while on a different trip.. and on the way through Holland on the return leg, in the wine section, bought some wine, and you know how heavy wine bottles are...and carried what I bought plus my carry-on luggage and what friends bought, with no effort at all. Sure did beat lugging that important stuff in my arms . I was so glad I took it with me.

ICEMAN Were you 'light' camping when you brought all that yummy stuff with you, to eat?
Spiced wine, hard salami, brie, and chutney? & hard rolls? Cocoa, cider, tea, jello. Who carried it? <smile> That makes sense to eat fat-laden food for warmth. I always make sure my Pooks has fatty meat when it's really cold out. Gosh, I see where you live up to your name. That description of your snow camp is something. That's what I call camping.

About Pee being bright yellow and signaling that you need WATER. I guess It's nature telling you what you should do, IF you listen. Also, I've read with the yellow, a strong smell is also an indication of your body's need for more water. That was smart of you bringing that up. Everybody should be aware of that.

Regarding drinking loads of water to stop an after-party hangover. Gosh, I haven't had one of those afflictions in years, but I do remember the one I did have and would rather not have had... One Winter evening we were celebrating with good friends... Had a tobogganing party on the slopes of our friend's farm and on coming in after hours of play, we were wet and cold and
bright with fun. The host started making hot toddys in front of the roaring fire... Rum and maple sugar and spices with a red hot poker stuck in the container...you could hear the sizzle when the poker hit the liquid. Oh! So Good! after the cold slopes. They went down so easy..
I drank one too many during the evening.... AND the next day... Oh! What a hangover I had. I would rather not remember that next day. Some other friends had ridden over on horseback during midday in the snow, and I had to send the kids to the door to tell them I was ill since I was unable to get off the sofa. <ugh> It was the last Hot Toddy I ever drank...<Smile>
Bye. FranceyS

Iceman
2006-02-01, 01:58
FranceyS, the heavy foods are brought in by pulk sled, behind me as I snowshoe. Both my wife and I pull a sled, each sled loaded pretty full of gear, the kids get to help flatten out the trail ahead as we go...until they tucker out! Tons of fun. No one else around. Have you ever seen fireworks over snow? Very bright, and a fun way to light up the winter darkness. When I snowcamp solo, it has been during cougar hunting trips. Lightweight, but still with a small sled. No reason to backpack gear over snow when it pulls so easily.

We intend to go this weekend for an overnighter, unless the weather forecast calls for high wind. (Exciting, but I worry too much about the family when the wind blows...) I am keeping my fingers crossed for no wind.

dropkick
2006-02-01, 03:32
Problem with carts would be getting them around and through obstacles in the trail and hauling uphill. Though a haul behind 2 wheel grocery cart might work just great.
You'd want large tires and good clearance. Wheelbarrow?
Years ago I did haul a large canvas tent around on what resembled a golf bag cart (don't know what you actually call them). It was easier than carrying it as the tent weighed about 150 to 200 lb. Didn't go very far from a road or river with it even so.

Did a quick drawing of my hammock, it should give you some idea of what I did.
Made it double bottomed for warmth (can stuff insulation in between).
This hammock is a bit different than any that I had ever done before, and am still experimenting with other options on it (tarps, skins, bug screen, foot cover, etc.)
Will have see how things work and report back.
Used 1 inch strap for the guylines as it is strong and easy on the trees.
Went with a side mount (unlike your HH) as it is what I'm used to, and I like being able to get in and out easily from either side (plus my dog is going to be in it with me, so easy loading).

http://www.freeimghosting.com/images/dropkick/p1138777434389.jpg

FranceyS
2006-02-01, 16:44
ICEMAN: I'm so glad to hear that my thought on a 2-wheeler was not entirely ridiculous, as I'd supposed. Then it is possible to carry stuff in a pull-behind type of device. Your using the sleigh type is terrific, and everyone pulls their share. Great!

I have accumulated a lot of stuff since I first received the HHammock and there's no way I could carry it all on my back as you experienced and hardy campers do.

DROPKICK: Again, I'm glad my thought was sane, after all.
Thanks for sending that hammock pattern. What a NEAT pattern for making a hammock one's self. To be sure, I WILL be trying that sometime in the future. I can't really see outfitting my children's children in an expensive HH, when we can make them for the kids...since there are 5 of them, each will want their own. It's obvious, that one can make a home job that would be more than suitable, and you could add things that are not on the HH. Like the long zipper I installed on my HH so I could make entry from the top, rather than the bottom...so much easier to get in and out of.

SGT'S CHARMING WIFE: I was in your neck of the woods yesterday.. Maryville. <smile> I haven't been there for some time. I was seeking someone off the Mall Road, stopped at the Income Tax place for directions, then later went to the BBQ place for Chili, which was very good. I was thinking of you both as I was driving into the 'city'.

PICTURE FOLLOWS OF WHAT I NEED FOR HIKING THE DEEP WOODS:
By the time I get through adding this and that, the food, and clothing for different weather this might give you an idea of what I'll be pulling...<smile> Decided not to use my bike though. And, Pooks could run free.

http://www.bikechina.com/images/tours/adelebikes/photos/photo61.jpg

dixicritter
2006-02-01, 17:45
[COLOR=Teal]


SGT'S CHARMING WIFE: I was in your neck of the woods yesterday.. Maryville. <smile> I haven't been there for some time. I was seeking someone off the Mall Road, stopped at the Income Tax place for directions, then later went to the BBQ place for Chili, which was very good. I was thinking of you both as I was driving into the 'city'.



Nice to be thought of! Yes gotta love the big 'city'... LOL. Luckily we don't live inside the city limits, it takes me about 10 minutes to get into town from my house. The view out my kitchen window is awesome with the mountains looking like they are close enough to just reach out and touch them. :)

Anybody jealous yet?? ;)

Seeker
2006-02-01, 17:51
Nice to be thought of! Yes gotta love the big 'city'... LOL. Luckily we don't live inside the city limits, it takes me about 10 minutes to get into town from my house. The view out my kitchen window is awesome with the mountains looking like they are close enough to just reach out and touch them. :)

Anybody jealous yet?? ;)


yes. very... are you on the road toward townsend? or on the way out toward loudon county? both really nice... i miss it alot...

Skidsteer
2006-02-01, 19:38
ICEMAN: I'm so glad to hear that my thought on a 2-wheeler was not entirely ridiculous, as I'd supposed. Then it is possible to carry stuff in a pull-behind type of device. Your using the sleigh type is terrific, and everyone pulls their share. Great!

I have accumulated a lot of stuff since I first received the HHammock and there's no way I could carry it all on my back as you experienced and hardy campers do.

DROPKICK: Again, I'm glad my thought was sane, after all.
Thanks for sending that hammock pattern. What a NEAT pattern for making a hammock one's self. To be sure, I WILL be trying that sometime in the future. I can't really see outfitting my children's children in an expensive HH, when we can make them for the kids...since there are 5 of them, each will want their own. It's obvious, that one can make a home job that would be more than suitable, and you could add things that are not on the HH. Like the long zipper I installed on my HH so I could make entry from the top, rather than the bottom...so much easier to get in and out of.

SGT'S CHARMING WIFE: I was in your neck of the woods yesterday.. Maryville. <smile> I haven't been there for some time. I was seeking someone off the Mall Road, stopped at the Income Tax place for directions, then later went to the BBQ place for Chili, which was very good. I was thinking of you both as I was driving into the 'city'.

PICTURE FOLLOWS OF WHAT I NEED FOR HIKING THE DEEP WOODS:
By the time I get through adding this and that, the food, and clothing for different weather this might give you an idea of what I'll be pulling...<smile> Decided not to use my bike though. And, Pooks could run free.

http://www.bikechina.com/images/tours/adelebikes/photos/photo61.jpg

I think we've been had! Pretty funny picture, FranceyS.

FranceyS
2006-02-01, 20:00
On the Cart, Please take note of the 2 Bear Bags, the black ones, stashed over the Hennessee Hammock,
and the foam pad for the HH on the right, and the extras in the lower rear.. That beige upright thing in the middle is my packed tent.
The pink lumpy sack on the bottom center is my 'duffle' with needed clothing. Can't leave
anything behind, you know. Can you recognize anything else? <smile>
Bye. FranceyS