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Truckin
2006-01-30, 14:03
Sgt Rock,

I have a question about parachute chord. For bear bags you recommended using parachute chord with the "guts" taken out. I have always used parachute chord, but I thought I might give your idea a shot. I experimented with this and found that removing the chord was more difficult than I had originally thought. I was able to remove the chord, but I ended up cutting the it into 4 equal sections and reconnecting the line with square-nots. Do you have an easier method? :confused:

dixicritter
2006-01-30, 14:46
Since Sgt Rock probably won't see this for a while I'll tell you how I do it.

Plenty of patience...LOL. Seriously, it's a matter ofsliding the outter layer away from the "guts" a little bit at a time. Depending on the length of cord you are using this can take a few minutes since it doesn't just pull out smoothly like in smaller sections.

I know that's probably clear as mud, and if you need further explaination all ya gotta do is ask. :)

Hog On Ice
2006-01-30, 14:48
well its not all that hard but it is rather boring as jobs go - take whatever length of P-cord you want to use (50 ft for example) and shuck the sheath down a little and tie the guts to a tree; now holding the sheath walk away from the tree letting the sheath slip when it gets bound up; when reaching the end go back to the tree and do it again after perhaps winding up the guts on a convient branch or two (optional) - this procedure will give you about 4 feet each time you do it so repeating it 12 times will give you your now gutless sheath to use.

j.johnson
2006-01-30, 20:21
What would be the idea behind taking the guts out of the cord? I would think it would make it harder to throw the cord over a branch.

dixicritter
2006-01-30, 22:32
It's a weight issue for Sgt. Rock.

He's a gram weannie.... shhhhhh don't tell. ;)

dropkick
2006-01-31, 02:12
What would be the idea behind taking the guts out of the cord? I would think it would make it harder to throw the cord over a branch.
The cord weight doesn't matter as you normally tie a rock bag to the end for a throwing weight.

Hog On Ice
2006-01-31, 09:14
The cord weight doesn't matter as you normally tie a rock bag to the end for a throwing weight.

I use a water bottle as my throw weight - a constrictor knot around the neck of the bottle (recycled 1 liter soda bottle) holds very well and it is easy to adjust the weight of the bottle by adding/drinking the water - I also find throwing the bottle is somewhat easier for me than a rock bag or a rock tied onto the cord.

One thing I have found with stripped P-cord is that it will tangle with any little piece of brush so I hold the bulk of the cord in my left hand in loose large loops while throwing with my right hand. As I throw I am releasing the cord from my left hand.

dropkick
2006-02-01, 01:56
I stole the design for my bear bag from somewhere on the web (Campmor maybe?).
I attached 50 foot of cord permanently to the bag, attached a rock bag to the other end, and sewed a pocket to the outside of the bag for the cord to be stored in.

Hog On Ice
2006-02-01, 10:10
These days I use a trash bag or trash compactor bag for my bear bag - twist the top, fold it over and attach the line with a cow hitch - light and water proof - multiple bags can be easily hung on the same line since a cow hitch is easy to tie in the bight for this application.

Iceman
2006-02-01, 12:37
HOI, I agree. We line everything with compactor bags if expecting rain or snow, pack, sleeping bag compression sack, etc... The compactor bags seemed to resist punctures the best, we have found...

Icemanat95
2006-02-01, 16:58
I leave the inner core in the sheath to maintain capability and the strength of the cord. Never know when you might need a strong cord, and the extra weight isn't too significant.

dropkick
2006-02-02, 02:41
I leave the inner core alone too. My 50 foot of line weighs less than 2 oz.
There is another line that REI sells that only weighs 1 oz. per 50 ft. but it's much more expensive and not nearly as strong.

My bear bag isn't waterproof, but I treated it so it's somewhat water resistant.
I pack all of my foods in waterproof packaging already so I didn't see a need to waterproof the bag. (weight addition and ease of treatment also played a part)

I package many foods separately, so if I have a problem only some of the food gets ruined. (I learned this lesson as a Boy Scout, when for a reason only known to prepubescent boys and now forgotten, I brought along a leaky bottle of High Karate aftershave and packed my food in the bottom of my pack.)

For plastic bags I use food bags with twist ties. I have had bad luck with zip locks and now avoid them. The food bags aren't as puncture resistant, but as they are protected by the bear bag so this isn't a problem. - They are also extremely lightweight.
I leave most of the food in the bag at all times and only remove what I need.

I use compactor bags for the big stuff - sleeping bag, etc.

Iceman
2006-02-02, 04:12
... I brought along a leaky bottle of High Karate aftershave and...
Aftershave to camp...? The girl scouts must have been camping nearby... :biggrin:

I smuggled a leaky bottle of "ashotoffeverybottlemydadowned" along on a highschool band trip, and it leaked all throughout my pack and soaked my sleeping bag. :bawling: The bottom storage area of the bus smelled like a dumpster outside a sportspub after the super bowl! Good news-there was still a couple of shots in the bottle. :cheers:

dropkick
2006-02-03, 02:25
=a leaky bottle of "ashotoffeverybottlemydadowned"
I remember that brand.
I used to get it some weekends when I was in high school.
However I used to carry it in a doubled plastic bag in an inside coat pocket.
The memory of it's taste and effects still linger.
:dancing2: :girlshit: :trytofly: :musicus: :puke: :vollkomme

Turk
2006-02-03, 15:11
my bear bag and rope system is also my kayak/canoe rescue line "throw-bag".
I was using a standard 50ft 3/8" poly rope, throw bag for a long time.
But it weighed in at almost 1lb. I searched all over the web for an
ultralight rescue line throw bag but couldnt find one.
Thanks to Lanthar I was introduced to spectra cord, and was able to buy
some. So I recently made my own.
Rope type: 45ft of 1/8" SPECTRA 12-strand.
continuous working load: 360lbs.
strength 1800 lbs.
weight: 3.82oz total (.085 oz /ft)
throw bag: silnylon stuff sack
bag dimensions: 2" x 4.5"
bag wt: 2.31 oz.

The spectra cord is awesome. I think its the same as what they
use on the HH UL backpacker. Anyone know? Not sure, but it looks
the same. I got a great yellow and red length of spectra for high
visability. And it does float. premium $$. but well worth it.

My bear bag is a Granite Gear: "Drylite Rocksolid" compression, stuffsack
drybag, size medium. (8"x18.5"). By far the most expensive
stuff sack i've purchased. At $35.00 ea. CAN, in hindsight I probablly
didn't need to buy 2. Ah well. Its a great sack, and ... I like my food dry.


The throw bag, as the name implies is pretty easy to toss over a tree
branch, and if I need a little extra wt, or if im going for a particularly
high branch, I toss a few rocks in the bag first. I keep a permanent
bowline knot in one end of my spectra and just clip my food bag up
to that. Its a great setup, and good multifunction use for my rescue
line. Not to mention a nice no-mess way to carry rope.
Think my total cost was $139.00 to make it. Not the cheapest way
to go for a rope in a bag. But not bad for something you can't
purchase commercially at that kind of weight.
It will get more testing this season. I'll let you know if there is
anything wrongh with it.

atraildreamer
2006-07-23, 02:53
Aftershave to camp...? The girl scouts must have been camping nearby... :biggrin:

I smuggled a leaky bottle of "ashotoffeverybottlemydadowned" along on a highschool band trip, and it leaked all throughout my pack and soaked my sleeping bag. :bawling: The bottom storage area of the bus smelled like a dumpster outside a sportspub after the super bowl! Good news-there was still a couple of shots in the bottle. :cheers:

Obviously, both of you were planning to use the alcohol in the aftershave as fuel for your Pepsi can stoves! :rolleyes:

MacGyver
2006-07-23, 09:00
Use leech line. That stuff is ultra-light and ultra-strong.

Regards,
-MacGyver
GA-->ME

JAK
2006-07-27, 23:25
Are any critters, like a racoon, smart enough to every chew through or even untie a rope? I could see spectra having a slight advantage in that case. Otherwise wouldn't a nylon rope, like parachord, be stronger because the stretch makes it more forgiving, or perhaps something like a dacron rope because of its abrasion resistance? Perhaps whatever is least likely to tangle and easiest to untangle might be best. In that sense I could see dacron or spectra might be better.

I gotta start hanging my food. Haven't had trouble here because the bears are so shy, but there is no sense training them once you know better.