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FranceyS
2006-02-06, 13:59
Did you all happen to see on TV, Sunday night, the FBI story:
A family & friends camping out in Van, RV, & tents for the kids in a State Park. The kids were asleep in their tent (3 of them) and a serial killer slit the tent side open, and dragged out the sleeping bag carrying the 9 yr old girl, carried her off and ultimately killed, dissected and burned her body, along with a young woman who wouldn't date him, then deliberately tortured the child's parents by calling and suggesting child was still alive. Former military man, a loner, with no reason for killing the child, and accidentally killing the young woman with duct tape over her mouth & nose while trying to abduct her. They finally got him years later.

Now, that makes me certainly rethink any possibility of tenting in the alone-mode. I had just revved up my courage thinking of tenting & hammocking and then I had to see this.

To be sure, any tenting/hammocking I do will be with some sort of safety precaution at my side. Beretta, Colt, Bear-spray.... Thinking about some
panic-situation... wild animal, brainless human, falling branches, etc. I sewed a long zipper into the Hennessey Hammock side for a quick exit... or, at least quicker than exiting from the 'basement' of the hammock. I suppose, If I were that frightened I might have a hard time at night finding the zipper tape, but at least it's there.

Most of you have been hiking, tenting and hammocking for years, and surely you've thought about the possibility of some event.
What would any one of you do in the event of attack by wild animal, or brainless human -- In hammock, in tent, or otherwise exposed in the night?
Just curious. Bye. FranceyS.

Seeker
2006-02-06, 19:24
i am absolutely unworried about animal attacks.

people scare the crap out of me... hence, stealth camping. but as far as a needed 'quick exit', no, i need no mods to my hammock... lead goes right through the side...

deadeye
2006-02-06, 22:42
Animal attacks aren't something to worry much about. They generally don't like us (although they are very interested in our food). I will admit that it's damn spooky when the coyotes are howling.

Humans are the most dangerous animal we'll ever meet in the woods, but most of the dangerous ones are lazy. Camping away from popular, that is easy-to-get-to-and-not-far-from-the-car, sites will almost eliminate the human danger.

Take-a-knee
2006-02-07, 00:01
I think you are in more danger on the drive to the trailhead than you will be in most hiking areas. I worry not at all about four legged critters here in the southeast, if I were in AK or the Yellowstone area, that would be a concern. We do have a growing black bear population in the southeast, and you probably should hang your food bag in a lot of places. I am concerned about two legged predators however, and that is why I recently purchased a marvelous little 14oz Smith & Wesson .357mag revolver made from Scandium and Titanium. With this device I intend to adhere to Thomas Jefferson's admonition to "...let your gun be your constant companion on your walks.". I haven't yet figured out where I will stow it in the hammock but I will find a place. If I were a female hiking alone I wouldn't consider doing it unarmed. A firearm alone isn't the answer, proper mindset is key. The vast majority of people you come in contact with on the trail will, like those posting here, mean you no harm and will come to your aid and comfort if need be. When hikers come in contact with non-hikers, that is a different story. Caution is the watchword. Be careful when and where you make camp if you are anywhere near civilization. I learned this the hard way, many years ago, I did three days on the AT with a few lovely ladies, one of whom was my wife. We passed a cabin near the AT south of Blood Mountain near dark and I insisted we push on for a while though a couple of the lasses wanted to join the festivities and revelry ensuing at the cabin. The ladies' shapely forms were noticed by the revelers as we passed. We made camp, the girls in my tent, and myself in overwatch nearby (this brings to mind the joke about falling in a barrel of...and coming out sucking my thumb). Sure enough, a couple of hours later we were awakened by drunks chopping trees nearby more than a half mile from that cabin. They didn't threaten us, but I was comforted by the feel of that Colt in my hand. I have no doubt it was a testosterone induced act on their part, a would-be mating ritual of sorts. Lesson learned: Because it was getting dark and the ladies were knackered I didn't push as far away from that cabin as I might have. Certainly a more stealthy campsite off the trail would have been in order.

Iceman
2006-02-07, 01:07
The only animal we have feared was a cow elk which tangled with one of our tent guy out lines...(actually I slept thru most of it, but my wife had big eyes that night...)

As for human trouble, never seen it-yet. Most hikers we have encountered are nice honest folk. I feel safer the farther I get from a trailhead. I would feel more vulnerable in a state park type setting, than backcountry.

I cannot think of any way to help you feel more comfortable, other than to ask you to honestly think of how more vulnerable you are in the city to crime and/or violence.

dropkick
2006-02-07, 01:25
In my neck of the woods I worry about bear, wolves, and cougar much more than I do people (wolves are a threat to my dog).
I sometimes carry a .357, but normally only in the spring or fall (hungry bears). And occasionally when there has been cat or wolf activity in my area.

I do carry bear spray in the outside pocket of my day pack, which is always with me when I go into the woods, no matter how short the hike. --I have a game leg and a bad tendency to occasionally trip and sprain ankles, wrench knees, and/or throw out my back, so I carry braces for ankle, back & knee, plus water, plastic tarp, breakfast bar, and etc. in case I need to recover for a while.

Between my staff or cane, the pepper spray, whatever weapons I might have on me (pocket knife, keys, etc.), and my size, I don't worry very much about something or someone coming after me.

Though I can understand, how you might have greater worries than I do.
Try thinking about it this way though:
Many, many, more people are attacked in their own homes than have ever been attacked while camping.
You are several thousand times more likely to die in an accident while in your bathroom than you are to be attacked by a person or animal while camping.
The most dangerous part of any hike is the drive to the trailhead.
So try to relax and enjoy yourself.

Salvelinus
2006-02-07, 17:10
The most danger I've had backpacking is by a couple of pet dogs. They came charging at me with teeth bare while their owners were taking a break just off trail. No leashes, of course. I had to knock a few teeth with the tip of my trekking pole to keep them away long enough for their owners to come get them. That's the reason I keep a large clip-on knife on my hip-belt. I'm not too worried about the wildlife or the people I meet in the backcountry--just the pets brought along for companionship, but not kept under proper control.

If you hang everything that has a food-like scent (food, drink mixes, toothpaste & toothbrush, lotion, etc.) you really don't need to worry about anything else in this area.

OK, funny story. Back in college, I got a bunch of friends together for a "camp-out" on a relative's land in rural Kansas. Out of all 8 of us, only one other had ever camped before. Well, it was really a blast teaching people how to enjoy the outdoors, but the other experienced camper and I couldn't resist taking people on a "snipe hunt." After having returned to the fire for 30 minutes or so, we decided to rescue everyone. They were our friends, you know. ;) After gathering a couple people, we were close to where we left a guy from Syria. All of a sudden, he jumped out at us screaming from behind a bush, brandishing some kind of a curvy 8-inch dagger. He didn't know it was us, and we didn't know it was him at first. He thought it someone coming to get him. Once we all figured it out, we had a good laugh.

FranceyS
2006-02-07, 19:02
SALVELINUS: Not being familiar with the expression "SnipeHunt" ... What is that? The man charging out of the bushes with a curved knife in hand.. Whooh! That's scary.... I take it, as rescuers, you didn't announce your presence before he charged... I assume it was nighttime and he couldn't see to recognize you all. I would think, in the dark of night, being unfamiliar with that area... the poor guy was probably scared witless by the night sounds, not knowing if a bear was ready to take him on. Geesh! Glad it wasn't me in his place. Bye. FranceyS

Iceman
2006-02-08, 00:30
Snipe Hunt Defined;
1. An elaborate practical joke in which an unsuspecting person takes part in a bogus hunt for a snipe, typically being left alone in the dark with instructions not to move until the snipe appears.
2. A futile search or endeavor

Some people I have known believe that a snipe does not actually exist. They do, hence;

Broiled Snipe Recipe;
Fill cavity with crumbled browned bacon and sweet pickle, mixed.
Truss birds, cover with softened butter, and dust with seasoned salt,
pepper, and paprika. Wrap in bacon slice. Brown in the broiler. When
browned, reduce heat to medium or lower rack and broil for 13 to 16
minutes more, basting and turning frequently. :eating:

Kill it and Grill it!

dropkick
2006-02-08, 03:24
The reason many people don't believe in snipe is because they don't know the correct method for hunting them.

1)You need a sack to catch them in.
2)You need something to change the shape of the hunters head and to hide the eyes - snipe can spot the shine of an eyeball at night and they also recognize humans as preditors - covering the eyes and changing the shape of the head confuses them - a pair of underwear worn on the head takes care of both these problems.
3)You hold the bag open next to the ground and make loud "Buck, Buck" noises. This sound is the male snipe's mating call and no matter the season the other male snipes will run towards the sound as will the females.
4)Don't be discouraged if you don't catch any for 15, 30, or even 60 minutes as often they have to travel long distances to reach you. Just continue to hold the bag open and make the loud "Buck, Buck" noises. (You might try varying the pitch) It may seem like a lot of bother, but you'll never taste anything like the snipe you'll catch if you put in the effort.

Seeker
2006-02-08, 11:22
SALVELINUS: Not being familiar with the expression "SnipeHunt" ... What is that? The man charging out of the bushes with a curved knife in hand.. Whooh! That's scary.... I take it, as rescuers, you didn't announce your presence before he charged... I assume it was nighttime and he couldn't see to recognize you all. I would think, in the dark of night, being unfamiliar with that area... the poor guy was probably scared witless by the night sounds, not knowing if a bear was ready to take him on. Geesh! Glad it wasn't me in his place. Bye. FranceyS

before you get too confused, the snipe is a real bird... just look it up in a bird book... sort of a cross between a woodcock and a sandpiper, if you ask me...

the snipe hunt is the "here's a sack/wait here in the dark until it comes along" trick often played on newbies...

FranceyS
2006-02-08, 11:39
<smile> I gathered, from the very first, that this 'snipe hunt' was a
joke sort of thing, but I wasn't familiar with the bird 'Snipe'. The hunters around my 'neck of the woods' do quail and dove hunting and an acquaintance presented me with a couple of pair of eviscerated and perfectly 'meat market' clean birds.

I found it fun to experiment with fixing them, since I enjoy cooking gourmet style. I filled them with a sausage, black currant & bread stuffing, and rotisseried them til browned & somewhat crispy on the outside and just perfectly done on the inside, which didn't take long as they were so little. With a glass of wine to toast the hunt and 2 birds each, they made a great meal.

You hunters out there, how do you fix your wild catch? Do you soak the game in a light salt water mix before cooking... Or do you hang them to 'season' the meat. Or, both. Just curious. And, what particular 'game' do
you hunt for. I think I remember someone hunting 'cats' (mountain lions)...Do you eat the meat? If not, why not?

Mutinousdoug
2006-02-08, 13:46
[You hunters out there, how do you fix your wild catch? Do you soak the game in a light salt water mix before cooking... Or do you hang them to 'season' the meat. Or, both. Just curious. And, what particular 'game' do
you hunt for. I think I remember someone hunting 'cats' (mountain lions)...Do you eat the meat? If not, why not?[/COLOR][/QUOTE]

FranceyS,
Preparation depends on the game. Quail and grouse I prepare just like chicken. Dove and ducks have a kind of liver taste to them and can use a salt water soak and bacon wrap. Rabbits and squirrels are good fried, pot roasted or crockpotted. Squirrels can be tough little morsels and rabbits too if you get an old one. There is no marbling fat in the meat to keep it juicy. I've never eaten jackrabbit or known anyone who has. They say they taste bad or they're tough, but the people saying that admit to never having tried one. That's strange, isn't it? On the other hand, I would never pass up the chance to eat a cottontail or snowshoe.
It's kind of a big production hunting cats around here. Normally those are hunted on horseback with dogs. In 25 years of elk hunting I've only seen one cougar close enough to shoot. (Too close, actually) They are reportedly good eating but I don't think Colorado issues more than a few hundred permits each year.

Seeker
2006-02-08, 14:51
gotta agree with MD on his prep... some eats just like 'store' food... other needs prep (e.g. ducks and salt water. i add apples to the dressing).

i've not hunted in quite awhile, but when i can get venison, i jerk it, mostly. but the meat can be prepared just like beef, though, since it's nearly non-fat, you have to be careful not to dry it out (lots of basting, or make as a stew).

never had jackrabbit... or cougar. musk ox is good (had some in alaska once) as is caribou sausage (also in alaska). ostrich is better than chicken. armadillo is greasy, but ok. possum on the half shell, they call it here...

shot and killed a squirrel once as a kid, and ate it... not too good... but maybe if there were more, in a stew, it would be ok...

incognito
2006-02-08, 19:19
Marinate in vinegar overnight,(small game) rinse well, par boil, put in pot to make it into a stew, season to taste.

Squirrels are the tastiest<smile>

Deer-----Make into sausage, that's the only way to make it taste good<smile>

Native Americans boiled to tenderize, worked for them, works for me<smile>

I recommend you not camp alone!!!!!!!!!

I would like to have seen the doves on the rotisserie. Tiny little birds, not worth the price of a shell IMHO.<smile>

Salvelinus
2006-02-08, 20:42
Francey: he didn't look scared, he looked ready to kick some butt! :)

The others did a good job of defining the term, and Dropkick has obviously done this a time or two! The more details, the more believable it is! ;)

It's just a male right of passage for the outdoors crowd. I went out and retrieved my friends after only 30 minutes. When I was taken on MY first snipe hunt, I finally gave up and went back to camp 2 hours later!

Ringneck Pheasant deboned and baked with sauteed onions and mushrooms in a brown sauce . . . <slurp>

:D

Mutinousdoug
2006-02-08, 23:08
Marinate in vinegar overnight,(small game) rinse well, par boil, put in pot to make it into a stew, season to taste.

Squirrels are the tastiest<smile>

Deer-----Make into sausage, that's the only way to make it taste good<smile>

Native Americans boiled to tenderize, worked for them, works for me<smile>

I recommend you not camp alone!!!!!!!!!

I would like to have seen the doves on the rotisserie. Tiny little birds, not worth the price of a shell IMHO.<smile>

In the city parks here, there are fox and grey squirrels that would make fine eating if the police would let you harvest a few. In the mountians there are "pine" squirrels that are little bigger than chipmunks and exist on a diet of pinecones exclusively. They taste like turpentine (don't ask..., I know, OK?) and have less meat on them than your average 6" brooktrout. Hardly worth the effort to skin them (although, Ladies? for the fashion conscious, the rawhide skin makes excellent bootlaces.)
Doves don't fit on my rotisserie. Pull the breast out of the carcass by sticking your thumb between their throat and breast and pulling the breast away from the rest of the bird. Throw the rest(feathers and bones) away.That leaves you with two walnut sized nuggets to wrap in bacon and toast in your oven like chicken livers.
Estimated harvest via the Colorado Div of wildlife is one box of dove shells = 1-2 birds.
Deer taste is all over the place. I have shot two deer in the same season and loved the one as being like the best lamb I've ever eaten and another we feed to the dog as being inedible.
Per Incognito's recommendation, I don't much camp alone. As the above posts mention, your biggest threat is at the trailhead. I've never been threatened by humans in the backcountry although about 20 years ago in Colorado there was a guy here dubbed: "Arapahoe Sam" that spent one summer robbing backpackers of their food and stuff.
Situational awarness is your best defense. If you meet someone on the trail that makes you think, make eye contact and remember the face. If someone gets too close or too familiar, confront them and say you like to keep your space. That's what you are there for, right? Then, (before dark) think about moving your camp after dark. there is no reason for someone to approach your camp in the middle of the night unless you are camped on the path to the latrine. Don't apologise to anyone for being armed, it's your right, but don't brandish your arm either.

FranceyS
2006-02-08, 23:37
INCOGNITO: The little birds I rotisseried ... They were quail. And, yes, they are not very big.
And, yes, stuffed & plump with sausage dressing and brushed with butter & forked & tied onto the rotisserie bar , they browned easily , and they were very good.

The very first time I ever cooked a wild bird, I didn't know it was wild. I came home from work one day and there in
the refrigerator was a butcher paper wrapped large bird. My husband said it was a chicken that he got at a
chicken farm they had worked near. It was lovely and clean and like any other chicken ready to be roasted. So, I stuffed it and baked it just as I would a chicken. We were newly married at the time & I didn't know the difference between one fowl and another. It was good. He later told me that during a drive home from a client's place (He was a Surveyor) they had hit the pheasant with the survey truck, picked it up, defeathered it, and all the other things one does to prepare a bird for cooking. He knew I wouldn't give it house room if I had known the particulars... which is true... <smile> and that was my first introduction to wild game. From then on, no problem.

About venison: My husband was an avid hunter of deer. So long as he presented the wild meat to be cooked looking
like it came out of a meat market, I enjoyed cooking it. The venison steaks we had, fried
or broiled, were very, very good. It's possible they were young animals, because the meat was tender and you
really couldn't tell it from beef. It wasn't gamey at all. Very dark in color. Perhaps because they were corn fed by all the farms , that made a difference. My husband & his friends were especially particular on how the deer were skinned and cut up. I was never in on that (ugh!) but he said often that the meat's gameyness had a lot to do with the skinning, that and the animals age. I wouldn't know. I never hunted... I only cooked what he brought home..(properly wrapped.) <smile>

We had friends who would not eat wild meat. One night, after making a venison stew, with
carrots and onions and such, we invited them for dinner. The stew was tender and very tasty and afterward
I asked them what they thought of the 'beef stew'. Nothing but compliments. I never did tell them they enjoyed
venison.

Like you, our hunting friends also made sausage of the lesser cuts of meat. But the prime cuts, the steaks, we just cooked like you cook a steak today.. pan fried or broiled.

And, yes, I agree with you, I think I have already come to the conclusion that I would not be able to camp alone.
I'm trying to encourage other friends to share camping with me. Bye. FranceyS

Iceman
2006-02-08, 23:44
Ok, got to jump in here. Wild game is no different than the "domesticated" meats we eat daily. We are just used to the store bought variety.

In my opinion, the issue with a lot of folks claiming that "yuck, Deer meat is nasty/gamey....." or "those trout taste like mud...." resolves around one simple factor. Many (and I am going to generalize here) guys, treat what they kill like crap. How many times have you seen some dufus trolling around a lake, dragging a half dozen fish alongside his boat, in lukewarm water for six hours. Or the guy who blasted a deer, drags it out of the woods to his pickup, and parades it around to all the local gas stations in order to show off his "trophy", and not skinning the deer for five hours? Yet, this same dufus rushes his cellophane wrapped T-Bone into the refrigerator before it even starts to warm!

Treat your trout like a buoy, and it will taste like a buoy. Treat your Deer like roadkill and it will taste like roadkill. Simple fact.

If you clean your catch quickly, hurry the meat into refrigeration, you have good eats. Lay it in the sun, drag it through the lukewarm oily chop from your local lake, leave it laying in its super warm fur coat for hours and hours, and its going to taste like schitt!

Deer steaks are excellent. Trim any fat from the meat as you butcher, keep it clean, do not let a butcher cut your meat with a bone saw, which "butters" each side of each steak with bone marrow, fat, and bone chips. A butcher has to do this to make a buck, he is in a hurry.

My point is to treat your catch like-FOOD!

FranceyS
2006-02-09, 00:53
SALVELINUS: That "ringnecked pheasant, deboned and baked with sauteed onions and mushrooms in a brown sauce".
Even this late at night, you are making my mouth water. You sound like you are a gourmet cook?

That reminds me of my relatives out in South Dakota - - where flocks and flocks of pheasants are. My parents told me that every year, the South Dakata relatives would send by mail... by mail, Imagine?.....a brace of pheasants, to my parents... with legs and heads and feathers on. The winters up north were much, much colder than they are now. He said they would mail them whole, with feathers and heads on, tied together by the legs, with a mailing card, not even boxed. I can't even imagine that happening nowadays.

MUTINOUSDOUG: I don't think a dove breast would fit on my rotisserie either. What I rotisseried was quail. Even they are not very bigl, but tasty.

Good advice about confrontation. As I hike at various parks, I often think what I would do off alone like that, with no one to turn to. I've been lucky so far. One afternoon, at a really large park... me and Pooks trekked off into the wood's paths, and they were really nice. I'd planned on an hour's trek out and back. We'd hiked for about 45 minutes and were really into 'lonesome country'. I had no idea where I was.
I considered turning around and going back but believed... Really, the end is just around the corner, after all, this is
a park with limited surroundings. So, I continued on assuming it would circle around back to the Trailhead.

Pooks brightened up and I thought... Oh! Great! the end is in sight. Instead it was another hiker, a young man, coming from the opposite direction. Here I was, over an hour into God's country, deep woods, and the only soul I've encountered is this man, also hiking. We smiled and exchanged pleasantries and he said the end was a couple of miles further on. Here I am, in these dense woods, all by myself with Pooks, and as the man and I parted, that couple of miles was a nervous couple of miles. I felt absolutely 'vulnerable' and debated whether to hide in the deeper woods for a half hour, watching the trail, to make sure I was 'safe'.

As it was, I continued on and came to a lonely one lane road with not a house around. I didn't know which way to turn. So, I mentally flipped a coin and turned right. About a mile down the road there was a house, and I headed straight for it. The lady gave me directions to get back to the Park, and was I glad to get back. After that, I looked at the maps they give out to be sure I knew where I was, how long the trail was, etc. You know how it is, you live and you learn. <smile>

ICEMAN: Like you, I can't remember any venison that we ever had that wasn't wonderful eating.

Mutinousdoug
2006-02-09, 01:22
Ok, got to jump in here. Wild game is no different than the "domesticated" meats we eat daily. We are just used to the store bought variety.

Treat your trout like a buoy, and it will taste like a buoy. Treat your Deer like roadkill and it will taste like roadkill. Simple fact.

If you clean your catch quickly, hurry the meat into refrigeration, you have good eats. Lay it in the sun, drag it through the lukewarm oily chop from your local lake, leave it laying in its super warm fur coat for hours and hours, and its going to taste like schitt!

Deer steaks are excellent. Trim any fat from the meat as you butcher, keep it clean, do not let a butcher cut your meat with a bone saw, which "butters" each side of each steak with bone marrow, fat, and bone chips. A butcher has to do this to make a buck, he is in a hurry.

My point is to treat your catch like-FOOD!

Iceman makes some good points but I stand by my opinion that deer taste varies more than any other animal I've eaten. Of the two deer I mentioned in my post above, the disgusting one was handled, if anything, better than the one that made good table fare. I shot the "bad" one coming into an alfalfa field that the herd came into every night, so it wasn't "sage" or anything else that made it funky. The "good" one was a flatland deer feed on grassland pasture. nothing special. both came out of their hide and went into cheesecloth the night they were shot and cooled down to 50f+/_ .
Like Iceman I recommend de-fatting and boning deer, antelope, elk and moose...ungulates in general; the fat goes rancid quickly.
When I go camping where I can catch trout, if I can't eat them there, I release them. They don't taste the same at home.
FranceyS,
If there were enough pheasants to hunt in Colorado, I'd make some recommendation on fixing them, but I don't get to Kansas and Nebraska enough to make a competant suggestion for cooking them. I'd end up going to "Joy of Cooking" and be happy.
Doug

dropkick
2006-02-09, 02:58
You hunters out there, how do you fix your wild catch? Do you soak the game in a light salt water mix before cooking... Or do you hang them to 'season' the meat. Or, both. Just curious. And, what particular 'game' do
you hunt for. I think I remember someone hunting 'cats' (mountain lions)...Do you eat the meat? If not, why not?
I will take venison over beef any day of the week (elk is my favorite).
I haven't ever eaten cat, but I have read that many of the famous old time mountain men (Bridger, Crockett, etc.) said that it was the best of all meats.
They used to have a festival called the "Cat Feed" in a nearby town a few years ago, but though I wanted to go I always got to busy elsewhere to go, and now it's gone... bummer....

Everybody here has given good advice so far.
The most important thing is to cool the carcass as quickly as possible.
Gut it and prop the rib cage open. I also pack the open carcass with snow when it's available.

I normally don't skin until I have it home and hanging, as it helps to protect the meat from getting dirty, and I don't carry a body bag (though it is easier to skin the animal when it's warm and also helps with cooling).

I butcher most of my own meat, I do take some cuts and the scraps to a real butcher to be ground or made into sausage though.
If the weather allows I let the meat cure for a few days before I butcher. This is just a personal preference though, and I have also butchered the same day. I wait as it is supposed to tenderize the meat (works?) and it is the way my family has always done it.

I trim all the fat that I can off deer, as any 'wild' taste is normally found in it.

I don't like the taste of duck and I'm not real found of goose. Pheasants and grouse always seem to me like to much work for too little meat. But I have hunted them all and probably will again.

I like to fish and trout is o.k. but normally I only catch and release.

Streamweaver
2006-02-09, 11:40
MY first snipe hunt, I finally gave up and went back to camp 2 hours

Ive been asking people a question for years now(and yes I have hunted since I was a kid) but have yet to get an answer. When they are playing a prank on someone ,sending them out to hunt an imaginary animal,why then do they call it snipe hunting? Snipe is a real gamebird that people really do hunt ,so why not make up a name for it? This never made sense to me!LOL Snipe are a member of the woodcock family and a reported to be very tasty.

Salvelinus
2006-02-09, 20:24
I don't know . . . part of the belivability factor, perhaps? ;)

Francey--I don't know about South Dakota, but game laws in Kansas, where I grew up, mandate that feathers or legs remain attached to the pheasants during transport. It is so game officials can positively identify the bird as a male. It is illegal to take female pheasants. Before I left Kansas, I bought a lifetime hunting license. For years I hunted when visiting during the holidays, but now instead of taking the Labrador, we have kids. The dog (Cory) is getting old, and his hips are not good anymore, anyway. Now he only hunts in his dreams. Every once in a while, while he's dreaming, I'll say softly in his ear "Hunt 'em dead . . . " which makes his legs kick just a bit harder. :)

Trout . . . mmmmmmmmm . . . nothing like FRESH trout. I heartily agree with Muntinousdoug, though. If I'm not camping, I release the fish. They definitely aren't the same the longer it is before you eat them. Try cooking the trout butterfied with the skin still on, tacked around the edges to a hardwood board. Brush the flesh with a mix of almond butter and maple syrup, and prop it up next to a fire, so the radiant heat cooks the fish. <slurp!>

FranceyS
2006-02-09, 23:36
ICEMAN: About the fat on the venison producing the gamey flavor. When I think back on the venison I cooked, apparently my husband removed every trace of fat, because I cannot remember seeing any type of fat on the meat when preparing it and they never had bones.

MUTINOUSDOUG: You couldn't pick a better cookbook than "The Joy Of Cooking".

DROPKICK: What a great treatise on how to prepare an animal after you've downed it. I can just see the hunters I've seen in the past driving by with a deer on each fender next to the engine, after a 4-5 hour drive from the mountains in NY State.
Certainly, the weather was bitter cold, but snugged up against the engine.... couldn't be cold there. I wonder what the meat tasted like after being heated up like that, for that many hours.?

STREAMWEAVER: Just a suggestion about 'snipe hunts'... You could call them Lark hunts.. or Gambol hunts... or Caper hunts..... All three, Lark, Gambol and Caper are same words for 'Prank'... and, a Lark is a real bird, a song bird. <smile>

SALVELINUS: How interesting.. about the feathers head and legs being a requirement in mailing a whole pheasant. I've never heard that before. Isn't it amazing what one can learn just by reading these interesting replies. I'll have to pass that information on to my brothers. I'm sure they are not aware of that either.

And dear Cory... your old-faithful hunting companion. I can just visualize him kicking his legs, as my dog does when she's dreaming... and even more so when you murmur 'Hunt em dead'... Bless our faithful canine friends. How old is Cory?

That Butterflyed Trout on an open fire is another recipe I'm going to keep in my mental recipe stash. What a wonderful idea. I do like to eat trout, and have tasted it pretty fresh out of the water at a mountain hotel that fishes them out of the stream just before cooking them. Delicious!

I appreciate you Guys sharing your recipes.

Has anyone tried cooking fish in a beer can over an open fire. After you drink 7/8ths of the cold and tangy beer, you cut a slash down the middle of the beer can lengthwise, then across the top and bottom of this slash..keeping the drinking hole towards the top so that last 1/8 amount of the beer in the can doesn't spill out ...This forms 2 wings. Then open the wings up. You can then put in some finely chopped onion. Then fill it up with chunks of fish. Season them. Fork them around a little so it distributes the seasonings and the beer and onions on all the fish pieces. Close the wings and set the beer can in the coals of a quiet fire. It's easy to tell when it's done, and it smells and tastes great! Bye. FranceyS

Mutinousdoug
2006-02-09, 23:48
Trout . . . mmmmmmmmm . . . nothing like FRESH trout. I heartily agree with Muntinousdoug, though. If I'm not camping, I release the fish. They definitely aren't the same the longer it is before you eat them. Try cooking the trout butterfied with the skin still on, tacked around the edges to a hardwood board. Brush the flesh with a mix of almond butter and maple syrup, and prop it up next to a fire, so the radiant heat cooks the fish. <slurp!>
Salvelinus,
I only wish there was hardwood boards around here to tack a fish to. Nothing but pine or cottonwood. The oakbrush grows to a size that an old branch could maybe be used for a sheleighle for a guy my size. I carry a fish shaped grill about 17" long when I'm in fish country (that the gram counters would say was an extravagance), and it has no other multiple use other than roasting mushrooms or game bird breasts, so I'm pretty defenseless. Maybe I could tack my fish onto my canoe paddle (but I don't think so). That's a bad idea no matter if the paddle was ash, cedar, plastic or aluminum.

FranceyS,
We kind of Hijacked your thread about camping alone and safety. Or are you still interested in hearing about our cooking? I think the archives carry alot of preparation and situational awareness threads and opinions there of.
Hard to keep us guys from turning a thread into something about equipment or food.

dropkick
2006-02-10, 01:15
I can just see the hunters I've seen in the past driving by with a deer on each fender next to the engine, after a 4-5 hour drive from the mountains in NY State.
Certainly, the weather was bitter cold, but snugged up against the engine.... couldn't be cold there. I wonder what the meat tasted like after being heated up like that, for that many hours.?

A lot of these guys feel a need to display their kill. I never did. I might keep the antlers for a short time, but I've always ended up giving them away sooner or later. I'm a meat hunter. I'd rather shoot a cow over a bull any day.
--however if I ran up against a 7 point* and I had the tag I would probably end up showing off the antlers.

I always remember one day during hunting season when I was visiting Lincoln, MT. I was downtown and I could see a truck parked at the gas station with a 3 point* whitetail in back. The head was propped up so everyone could see the deer and be awed by the hunter's prowess. I wandered over to take a look. The deer had been shot through the body, neck, and gut at least 7 times that I could see.
If it had been my deer I would have hid it under a tarp.

* I use the "old" point counting system and only count one side - this means 7 point is as high as you go. I think counting both sides is just a ploy to make the rack sound bigger. 7=14 3=6


I like to cook trout with a willow branch bent in a circle and branches going over and under the split fish to hold it. - Makes me feel resourceful.

FranceyS
2006-02-10, 11:13
MUTINOUSDOUG: My inquiring about camping and safety were well-answered. And, I love to hear about
cooking and how many different ways there are of doing the same thing. I suppose we should start a new thread for those who are interested in this turn-off from the original thread. This is a learning experience for me. This is a great site for participating and finding new/old ways of doing things.

DROPKICK: Another interesting 'point'... <smile> Often, when living on the farm, we would see in the early morning, when the fog would lift just above their heads, buck deer with tremendous antlers. I would try to count all the points and found it impossible to do so from the distance involved from window to the field. And, if I had simply counted the points on one side as you do, I would have had no trouble determining how mature the animal was. Why didn't we think of that?. .<smile> Another instance of simplicity making things so much easier...

That 'willow-branch' procedure for cooking trout... Another neat way of cooking fish. You must have Indian blood in your veins. I'm pretty sure I read, years ago, of the Indians cooking fish that way in the Northwest.

Bye. FranceyS

Mutinousdoug
2006-02-10, 13:33
The only reason 'Easterners" count all the points on a rack is whitail deer usually have asymetrical antlers, often with two or more points on one side than the other. Muley bucks and elk bulls are more symetrical and in fact, the scoring systems count off for asymetry in those species allowing a different catagory for "non-typical".
Both whitetail and muleys roam the river bottoms of the eastern plaines of Colorado and occasionally interbreed. A huge (western count) 7 point muley may be just a mature (eastern count) 7 point whitetail. You need to know whether the speaker is using "Eastern" or "Western" count when he's bragging about his 4 pointer.

dropkick
2006-02-10, 19:28
If he calls elk wappatti he'll use an eastern count.

I consider any rack that is asymetrical to be a nontypical.
Most whitetail around here are symetrical.
-But I don't count tines that are under 1 inch.

Another difference, our muleys and whitetails don't mix much, as the muleys mainly stay in the higher elevations.

Side note: freind of mine used to have the B&C record for nontypical elk. Huge rack.

SowthEfrikan
2006-02-25, 14:51
FranceyS, to get back to the original topic before it veered off into recipes :biggrin: For a long time I always thought of other hikers as being people in love with the big outdoors and relatively sane. Then I chanced to read a few articles about people who were literally certifiably insane that take to the woods, and while by the sounds of it they were completely harmless, it's made me a lot more cautious. You just never know. It's easier for men out there, I think, than women. Bigger, stronger, predators rather than prey. Never felt threatened enough to want to reach for a weapon, but then try to hike with at least four people. Safety in numbers.

FranceyS
2006-02-25, 17:07
[COLOR=Teal]SowthEfrikan: I really am inclined to agree with you and others, that camping alone is not too wise. One never knows. And zipped into a Hennessey Hammock...<smile> Whooo! No fast exits.

I'm really looking around for other woodsy people who would like to join
me in camping out. No luck so far. Like you say, there is safety in numbers and I totally agree. In addition to other campers, like several members suggested, having the warm confidence of a 'comfort' handpiece does allow one to feel a tiny bit safer when camping alone. <smile> I never go anywhere without it while camping in my motorhome, so to be sure, I'd have it with me in my snug, warm and cozy hammock. I know they are not allowed in Parks, but my theory is, "Better to be safe and ready, than sorry in every way." And, it's not very big, and I would certainly never, never threaten anyone with it.

While at a campground in Louisiana in late October some years ago..on one of my first trips. I was just about the only one in the campground. I was outside messing around. My now deceased buddy, my Chow dog, was tethered to the rear of the motorhome on a 15' line. As most Chows are, she was very aggressive and loving. At about sundown, a pickup truck with several late-teenagers came driving slowly down the road and when they saw me, two of them jumped out of the back of the truck not 75 feet away, and they were hollering back and forth to each other... playfully..you know. Playfully, maybe, but frightening to me, all alone.

I immediately got into the motorhome. I partially closed the miniblinds and lay the Beretta on the nearby countertop, and watched.. They circled my area round and round, in the truck and on the ground, yelling back and forth, then one of the loose-cannons who had jumped out started jogging at an angle across the back of my site. Whether he had a notion to grab my expensive bicycle... or what???... I don't know...But, my dog objected strenuously... She threw herself onto the end of the line at him snarling and barking... and the wiseguy decided wisely to alter his path back to the road & the truck. He then, with his buddy, jumped into the back of the pickup and they left.... To be sure, I was 'on guard' the entire rest of the night.. but noone bothered me after that, thankfully. That Beretta surely made me FEEL safer. And, thank Heavens for my wonderful Chow dog companion.
Whether I would have used it or not is anyone's guess, but it sure did give me confidence. No Park attendants were anywhere in sight until the next morning. Certainly makes camping interesting..

Anyone else have any tales to tell? <smile> Bye. Francey

Hog On Ice
2006-02-25, 18:19
well I don't know if this is a tale or what but the first time I went backpacking with people I only knew from an internet forum was a little worrysome. The people I have met from that forum have all been good folks however and now its anticipation and not worry when it comes time to go backpacking with them again. FranceyS you may want to check into some of the planned trips over on thebackpacker.com/trailtalk - I'm planning on going to the Sipsey trip along with several friends from the forum - its one of the really fine areas that I keep coming back to - if you are interested let me know or just go to the thread attached to the trip and introduce your self - note however that the trailtalk forum can be a bit rough on newbies until someone on the forum actually hikes with the newbie - its the way the forum sorts out the trolls from the real people and also it sorts out the people that can keep a good sense of humor from those who can't.

Seeker
2006-02-26, 01:23
you need to check out whiteblaze.net too... lots of good folks over there, and some from the knoxville area too... i think 'solemates' and 'frolicking dinosours' are both nearby.... actually, the dinosours are across the river but i forget the name of the town... out by the alcoa hwy in any case... there's also a woman named 'little red mg', or something similar, who i believe is from nashville... whiteblaze also has a female forum... mostly female topics. men can read and post too, but most stay away out of respect, and only speak up when they have a point to make... it's definitely got a different 'feel' to it... anyway, they have several threads that address safety for women hikers...

btw, a lot of us here post there too, under the same names... it's a lot less cozy over there though... i feel like most folks here are friends, we talk so much... well, i talk... others listen to my chatter very politely... but you know what i mean...

anyway, check out whiteblaze's female forum for safety issues...