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Turk
2006-02-10, 16:24
I know there are alot of very specific knife preferences out there.
I would like to know if anyone owns a TOPS, Tom Brown Tracker.
And what you think about it. Weight, quality, function etc.
Lots of controversy over Tom Brown the person. (I personally lean
on the "he's full of B.S." side of the fence). But how about his
knife? I have an opportunity to get one really cheap. Been reading
some top 5 best and worst reviews. Thought I would check here
to see if anyone owns and has used one.

I am most specifically interested to hear how it handles chopping.

Streamweaver
2006-02-14, 12:10
Im not familiar with that knife (or the guy they named it for) but Id bet money that someone on Bladeforums.com (www.bladeforums.com) would.

Seeker
2006-02-14, 13:44
i read an article in reader's digest about 30 years ago about him... he spent a lot of time with his best friend's apache indian grandfather, who taught them to track in the pine barrens of north jersey... the article was more about him being called in to track a retarded man who wandered away from his home...

if people think his tracking ability is BS, i'd say 30 years is a long time to be able to pull the wool over someone's eyes (ie, the public). i've heard he started some sort of outdoor school/classes a few years ago... can't say whether what he teaches there is BS or not.

anyone know for sure, or have a stronger opinion one way or the other?

dropkick
2006-02-14, 19:27
I know I'm probably going to get chewed out for some of this as it isn't P.C., but...
Tom Brown might know a lot about survival and tracking, but anytime anyone speaks of being one with the earth or one with nature, I have to think that they are either full of b.s. or awfully naive.

He also says he bases his philosophy on Apache teachings. In my estimation Apaches are possibly the tribes that are and were the furthest from any type harmony with nature. Good trackers/fighters though.

Streamweaver
2006-02-15, 11:34
Tom Brown might know a lot about survival and tracking, but anytime anyone speaks of being one with the earth or one with nature, I have to think that they are either full of b.s. or awfully naive.

Yeah,thats what people always say when they dont really have a clue as to why they are anybody else spends time in the wilderness. :biggrin:

GregH
2006-02-15, 17:00
I'll second the BladeForums.com recommendation. While you're there, check out Swamp Rat and Busse knives. They're serious choppers.

Turk
2006-02-17, 10:09
Thanks for the advice. Blade forums helped alot.
As for Swamp Rat and Busse, I know Busse is considered the end all be
all of quality blades, but I can't afford one :biggrin: . I do own a Swamp
Rat Camp Tramp, and its a great quality knife, but there are some features
I wish it had. The Tom Brown Tracker is seriously utilitarian for my style
of hiking and camping. What I am finding is that while my HI khukuri is
one serious chopper, it lacks in fine cutting tasks and is a serious wt
penalty. It is a fantastic blade. It is just more than I need.

In regards to that article Seeker was speaking of about Tom Brown and
his tracker training, if you haven't heard the controversy behind it. Here
is what it boils down to in a nut shell.

- There is no doubt he is qualified and knowledgeable. Major years of
experience and his school is wildly successful. The movie "The Hunted"
(which was pretty terrible imho) was loosely based on an event in
his life and provided major endorsement and publicity to his civilian
tracker school. It also showcased the survival knife he designed which
got alot of glamour shots in the film. Knife sales exploded as a result.
However the people at Bladeforums seem to concur that when this
happened, and Tom was forced to switch his manufacturer to TOPS,
there was a big drop in overall quality of the blade. - most still seem to
think it is a high quality blade, but not in the same league as Rats
and Busse knives.

- One funny tidbit is that in an interview with Tom shortly after his
movie was released, they dug out his published books, the most recent
being a biography of his life and the other was his Tracker non-fiction
how-to book from the 70's. In the interview they exposed his
"apache grandfather" story to be a complete fabrication, presenting
evidence and testimony from his own family. Also they exposed cronological
inconsistancies to some pretty eye raising events in the book. ...Tom had
very little to say in his defense. :biggrin:

- also brought up was some pretty strange advice Tom gives in his
Tracker book. Some survival experts had alot of negative things to
say. eg: Tom printed in one chapter that sitting in the top of a tree
during a storm was a good means of protection. Experts were quick
to point out some concern with things like oh ... wind... and lightning..
you know ... stuff that can get you killed up in a tree during a storm
- Worth noting, is that this major negative publicity did very little hurt
to his school or his self image. Loyal fans and graduates of his school
accepted his somewhat "fudged" background and chalked it up to
entertaining reading.

- What remains is that Tom still runs an elite Tracker course for
US Marines and US Navy Seal teams. Almost nothing is "public knowledge"
about these courses, and the internet is full of wild speculation and
best-guesses. The whole thing is shrouded in mystery and intrigue.
This I am sure is no coincidence and helps makes sure that Toms
civilian classes are always sold out.

I have read alot about Toms Civilian Tracker program, but I figured
with all of you active military guys here, and retired military, do any
of you know anything about his Top Secret non-civilian course?
Maybe somebody here knows somebody they served with that took it?
I would be interested to hear.

Seeker
2006-02-17, 15:43
turk,

thanks for the distilled 'tom brown controversy' post... i have the book 'the tracker'... had no idea there even WAS a controversy over its contents...

i know nothing about his teaching the military, but i've been out for 11 years...

Take-a-knee
2006-02-17, 23:23
I went to US Army SERE about 10yrs ago and one of the instructors at the SERE survival phase had been to Tom Brown's course. He said it was okay, he neither bragged on it nor ran it down. I think the Air Force Survival instructors are probably the very best at what they do. I've heard that some of them run an occasional course in the Florida Panhandle for civilians. As far as tracking, the best are usually those that take advantage of native tracking knowledge. IE the Australian SAS used Mouri members of the unit as trackers and tracker trainers. The Rhodesians used utilized local trackers extensively in their war against communist terrorists. A former Rhodesian officer wrote a book about tracking that was highly regarded in military circles. Tracking is like aikido, it is way cool but you don't learn it really fast, it takes time and practice.

blackdog
2006-02-18, 05:49
Tracking is like aikido, it is way cool but you don't learn it really fast, it takes time and practice.
Don't know much about tracking in reality, but i work with computer security. One way to know that there's been an intrusion is by really knowing what the system is supposed to "look'n'feel" normally. Nobody covers all their tracks. Most people are just too numb to see the tiny changes, though.

I was amazed the first time i could follow the tracks of a wild animal after slipping into "hackertracker" mode. Most computer systems are only "disturbed" by a handful individuals, but feeling the presence of a multitude of animals was truly a kick. I guess this is what native trackers do. I truly envy them as i could only keep the mindset up for a few minutes.

Oh yes... Knives. That knife looks like a one-tool-for-everything and i've never been fond of that concept. The kukhri (http://militarlagret.coolfreepages.com/knivar/images/11559_jpg.jpg) seems to be a nice tool, but only combined with another knife or two.


http://www.forntidateknik.z.se/IFT/MNTarb/1982/kkn01.gif
Does anyone know or maybe even use the north american crooked knife (http://members.aol.com/mocotagan/), btw? There's not much about it on the net...

weekender
2006-02-18, 10:12
saw a guy called Ray Mears use one on his Bushcraft tv series where he builds a birch bark canoe in Canada, myself i have a small hook bladed knife which i use to carve the bowl of a spoon or ladel not quite a crook knife but from the same type of family of knives i think

blackdog
2006-02-18, 16:32
Saw a guy called Ray Mears use one on his Bushcraft tv series where he builds a birch bark canoe in Canada, myself i have a small hook bladed knife which i use to carve the bowl of a spoon or ladel not quite a crook knife but from the same type of family of knives i think
Does your blade have a flat underside?

Ray Mears' site was a great disappointment. I can see his shows on Discovery channel and he makes a slightly conservative impression, although he seems to know his stuff. But his site doesn't share much information. "Buy the DVDs" and that's pretty much it. Not like this place at all...

weekender
2006-02-18, 19:45
mine was a faily cheap one basically a 'normal' knife blade bent round like a ? mark shape the crook knife is a flat bladed knife to be used like one handed draw blade/knife. I hope that makes sense . .
I know what you mean about his web site i thought there would be i dont know more hints tips or something but i suppose its to get you on the courses they run. I like the shows though not too die hard more enjoy nature and learn to live with it, which i like personally, and hes a hammock hanger so hes got to be okay..

Verlager
2006-02-23, 00:01
I know I'm probably going to get chewed out for some of this as it isn't P.C., but...
Tom Brown might know a lot about survival and tracking, but anytime anyone speaks of being one with the earth or one with nature, I have to think that they are either full of b.s. or awfully naive.

Tom Brown would definitely think that you are full of b.s. or awfully naive. Perhaps Tom Brown gained a measure of familiarity with the earth (nature) of necessity, by learning a "lot about survival and tracking." Being one with the earth doesn't mean becoming a tree, it means gaining a practical knowledge of survival while distancing oneself from shallow, soft people like you and me.

For example, it often appears that great athletes epitimize their sport, and we sometimes associate that sport with them. Yet they have real lives, too, although we aren't aware of it. Similarly, we speak of Tom Brown being "one with nature", disregarding the fact that he wears sans-a-belt slacks, two-tone loafers with gold chains and powder blue leisure suits, even in the woods. j/k -Just kidding!

oops56
2006-02-23, 01:08
I think when in the woods you must be in tune with it just look and listen after the city nosies gets out of your ears its a nice sound .I miss it got start it up again at one time i get up just before sun raise on Sunday bring a alcohol stove turm sport go up in the woods on a hill make coffee face east read the Sunday paper watch the sun come up love it going start doing again when it gets warm

dropkick
2006-02-23, 02:04
Tom Brown would definitely think that you are full of b.s. or awfully naive. Perhaps Tom Brown gained a measure of familiarity with the earth (nature) of necessity, by learning a "lot about survival and tracking." Being one with the earth doesn't mean becoming a tree, it means gaining a practical knowledge of survival while distancing oneself from shallow, soft people like you and me.

For example, it often appears that great athletes epitimize their sport, and we sometimes associate that sport with them. Yet they have real lives, too, although we aren't aware of it. Similarly, we speak of Tom Brown being "one with nature", disregarding the fact that he wears sans-a-belt slacks, two-tone loafers with gold chains and powder blue leisure suits, even in the woods.

If you would have read the other posts after mine you would have found support for my Tom Brown full of B.S. theory.

Also if you took more time and read my post a little better, I didn't say anything about people actually being close nature, I said, quote:
"anytime anyone speaks of being one with the earth or one with nature, I have to think that they are either full of b.s. or awfully naive."

I didn't speak of Tom Brown being "one with nature" he spoke of himself being so (on his website) and teaching others to be so through his pay for philosophy classes.

I don't know if you are a "shallow, soft person" but I don't consider myself to be one, and if you had said this to my face you would quite possibly be sitting on the ground right now with tears in your eyes and a sore nose.

Seeker
2006-02-23, 05:15
If you would have read the other posts after mine you would have found support for my Tom Brown full of B.S. theory.

Also if you took more time and read my post a little better, I didn't say anything about people actually being close nature, I said, quote:
"anytime anyone speaks of being one with the earth or one with nature, I have to think that they are either full of b.s. or awfully naive."

I didn't speak of Tom Brown being "one with nature" he spoke of himself being so (on his website) and teaching others to be so through his pay for philosophy classes.

I don't know if you are a "shallow, soft person" but I don't consider myself to be one, and if you had said this to my face you would quite possibly be sitting on the ground right now with tears in your eyes and a sore nose.

well put, sir. but it's just easier to 'ignore' him... i did months ago, after the socially irresponsible bomb-making material prank posts... been nice and peaceful 'round here since then, for me...

Verlager
2006-02-23, 10:17
If you would have read the other posts after mine you would have found support for my Tom Brown full of B.S. theory.

That doesn't mean the conclusions are correct.

Also if you took more time and read my post a little better, I didn't say anything about people actually being close nature, I said, quote:
"anytime anyone speaks of being one with the earth or one with nature, I have to think that they are either full of b.s. or awfully naive."

Think again. We normally rely on layers of technology and equipment to insulate us from the cold earth harsh. Wilderness survival skills can only do so much to keep us warm and toasty. The rest is attitude, not losing one's cool when they take away our compasses, clothing, etc. Then our comfort and survival becomes much more a factor of how married (how "one" we become) we are to the earth, the environment.

I didn't speak of Tom Brown being "one with nature" he spoke of himself being so (on his website) and teaching others to be so through his pay for philosophy classes.

He's advocating it, yes. What a surprise.


I don't know if you are a "shallow, soft person" but I don't consider myself to be one, and if you had said this to my face you would quite possibly be sitting on the ground right now with tears in your eyes and a sore nose.
Obviously, this is mild abuse which shallow, weak-minded individuals like yourself and your dimmy pal, Sgathak, must accept on a routine basis. Let fear and the fact that you don't have my address be the only things stopping you.

Iceman
2006-02-23, 10:54
In the past, I think Sgathak has placed Verlaghole on his personal ignore list. I think I will do the same.

Children really hate to be ignored.

Verlager
2006-02-23, 12:02
In the past, I think Sgathak has placed Verlaghole(sic) on his personal ignore list. I think I will do the same.

Children really hate to be ignored.
You won't be ignored. Laughed at in amazement, but not ignored. Anyway, thank you for amusing me; you're extremely idiotic. :) BTW, when I woke up today, I was constipated, but, after reading your gibberish, I can take a healthy dump.

Take-a-knee
2006-02-23, 12:15
Well, back to knives gentlemen. I'm quite fond of Benchmade's Griptillian, the problem is the production knives are all in 440C which doesn't take or hold a good edge, IMO. The guy behind www.equippedtosurvive.com (Doug Ritter)got benchmade to do a run of Griptillians with S30V blades, I haven't used it much yet but so far I'm impressed with it's edge-holding ability. It was scary sharp when I recieved it. The knife is large enough to be an effective weapon, small enough to be an effective tool, and not too heavy to carry with you at all time. If I thought I needed a chopping tool, I'd carry one of those Cold Steel Light Kukhris. The SV30 Griptillians are available from Aeromedix.

john pickett
2006-02-23, 12:47
"Well, back to knives gentlemen"

Thanks,
John Pickett :)

Verlager
2006-02-23, 15:48
I have a nice Benchmade Tetherknife made by Elishewitz (~$80 eBay) in Hawaii.

http://home.rochester.rr.com/ksose/SgtRock/TK-02.jpg
I do a lot of ropework, so I need a knife that is unobtrusive, yet instantly available. Also, in a hammock I sleep with a knife, just in case I get tangled up in nylon and have to cut my way out (it's happened (http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=911)).

Although I am not one with nature (like Tom), I don't need to use a knife as a weapon, although I could tie a tetherknife to a 6' stick and thereby fashion a simple defensive spear. To me, a knife is primarily a tool for cutting nylon cordage and tape.


Sorry for not including a coin in the pic for scale, but size is 5.75" w/o sheath. Blade is 2"

http://home.rochester.rr.com/ksose/SgtRock/TK-01.jpg

dropkick
2006-02-24, 01:25
Sorry to go off subject again, but I thought I'd say one more thing to Verlager before I ignore him.

Try to understand what the posts actually say before you reply to them.
Maybe it would help if you printed a hard copy and looked at it for a while, before replying.

I will not respond to any posts you make after this, so please don't waste the time and thread space needed to reply.

Verlager
2006-02-24, 10:44
Sorry to go off subject again, but I thought I'd say one more thing to Verlager before I ignore him.
So, you're conflicted about ignoring me? Any chance your wrath is misdirected?:stupid:


Try to understand what the posts actually say before you reply to them.
I do, it's not difficult. Most of your posts are shallow and one-dimensional, non-technical, and emotionally loaded. Not much food for thought, actually.


Maybe it would help if you printed a hard copy and looked at it for a while, before replying.Good idea! And, since I can't read fast, could you kindly type your posts more slowly? Thanks in advance!


I will not respond to any posts you make after this, so please don't waste the time and thread space needed to reply.
You promise? Yes, I'm sure we'll never hear from you again. :ciao: Glad you're sure that it's me you're angry with, and not yourself.

I believe your problem is that you fail to try to use even the meager intellect that you have. It is one thing to be stupid, another to revel in it. You seem to wear your ignorance like a badge of honor. Stop embarassing yourself and resolve to make more interesting, less rediculous, less hostile posts.

If you were truly snubbed by nature, then, of course, I apologize. But I believe the possibility exists that you're just intellectually lazy, and not stupid.

Verlager
2006-02-24, 11:58
well put, sir. but it's just easier to 'ignore' him... i did months ago, after the socially irresponsible bomb-making material prank posts... been nice and peaceful 'round here since then, for me...
Going to be nice and peaceful for you when I notify the ATF that you are discussing bomb-making materials in a public internet forum.

For the record, I have never made any "socially irresponsible bomb-making material prank posts." I don't make "prank posts", a prank post being one which seeks to deceive readers. Everything I say, is (unless it's an obvious joke) true and 100% accurate. I have never made such a post :boring:.

dropkick
2006-02-25, 03:04
You ever think about going with a pocket knife and bringing back your hatchet/tomahawk for wood work?

Not trying to dissuade you from any of the multi use knives, especially as you also have bulk issues (kayaking) but many small tools is an option you might consider.

I carry a small locking knife (SOG Twitch, 2 inch blade) and a small multitool (M+ Serbertool) that I have attached to my keys.
While I haven't gutted a deer or elk with the pocket knife yet* I have cleaned lots of fish with it, carved many useful things with it, and used it for eating.

I carry along my hatchet and a homemade swede saw for any large wood cutting needs.

While I don't have my scales with me so I could weigh them, I would bet that my group of tools and one of these big multi use knives approach each other in weight, and single use tools, when used for their purpose, usually do a superior job.

*The knife of a similar size it replaced (unknown brand -found while fishing) gutted several deer and a few elk. - Lost the knife after carrying for about 12 years, it was mourned.


Below are some bad scans (I really need a digital camera)
The first is my knife and 2 views of my multitool (attached to my keys and separate - keys added for scale).
The second is as much as would fit of my hatchet and saw (saw broken down and arranged for packing) on the scanner.
http://www.freeimghosting.com/images/dropkick/p1140848964527.jpg
http://www.freeimghosting.com/images/dropkick/p1140848966434.jpg

donredondo
2006-02-26, 06:27
Does your blade have a flat underside?

Ray Mears' site was a great disappointment. I can see his shows on Discovery channel and he makes a slightly conservative impression, although he seems to know his stuff. But his site doesn't share much information. "Buy the DVDs" and that's pretty much it. Not like this place at all...


go here:


http://www.bushcraftuk.com/ Quite a few from sweden there too :)

Streamweaver
2006-02-27, 14:50
gerber (http://www.actiongear.com/cgi-bin/tame.exe/agcatalog/results.tam?xax=22694&nextrow=11&maxhits=10&qrymark1%2Enew=1663&qrymark2%2Enew=0&priorcase=main) Here is an excellent little knife I found at Wally World for ten bucks.Very well made and weighs in at just over an ounce.Its called the Ridge Survival knife.Its the second knife down on the catalog .

blackdog
2006-02-27, 17:37
go here: bushcraftUK (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/). Quite a few from sweden there too :)
Interesting place, but i must admit that i've found more stuff to tinker with on this site. Thanks for the link, though, there's a lot of good reading there. Much appreciated. :)

blackdog
2006-02-27, 17:58
Here is an excellent little knife I found at Wally World for ten bucks.Very well made and weighs in at just over an ounce. Its called the Ridge Survival knife.
Looks quite a bit like the k.i.s.s in the dark (http://www.crkt.com/kissdark.html) by CRKT (http://www.crkt.com/). Very nicely stripped design.

Turk
2006-02-27, 18:45
You ever think about going with a pocket knife and bringing back your hatchet/tomahawk for wood work? ...

Not trying to dissuade you from any of the multi use knives, especially as you also have bulk issues (kayaking) but many small tools is an option you might consider.

This is exactly the point I am at now. Trying to figure out how I can cut
down on the "steel weight" I carry into the backcountry. I really haven't
found any good solutions yet, but I am still working on it.

I need a heavy duty chopper, and a camp knife, but I like to putter around
alot while at a particularly good camp site. LNT fanatics forgive me ... but
I really like Ray Mears, and building things with bushcraft. I like to make
chairs and tables. .. (well okay sometimes it ends up "attempted" chair
making). Awnings, large wind breaks, firewood shelters, pipes, lanterns
stuff like that. I find it really enjoyable.

Biggest problem with this kind of a backwoods hobby is that you end up
carrying a lot of tools. Saw, hatchet, chisel, several knives. cordage.

I am trying to get my camp/survival/chopper needs into a single tool.
Perhaps the Tom Brown Tracker will be the one. As for the hobbyist..
well I just havent found a really good multitool for that yet. What they
really need to do is design a multi tool specifically for carpentry.
That would be so awesome. :biggrin:

On a side note. Don't you think the corkscrew is THE most useless
feature of the SAK? I mean really. Why do they still include it in
almost every full featured knife. For the space it takes up on an SAK
I could think up 2 or 3 more tools I would much rather have.
One of those mysteries of life I guess.

Turk
2006-02-27, 18:50
Oh ya ... and one more thing.
They need to invent a bloody SAK for CANADIANS!!!
Forget the slotted screwdriver entirely. Its useless.
What every Canadian needs is a #2 Robertson.
I should patent that right now and sell it to Victornox
as an International SAK model :biggrin:

Personal belief. -- any sealed object or device that
is not a robertson screw is just not worth opening.
Give me a hammer! :biggrin:

dropkick
2006-02-28, 02:19
On a side note. Don't you think the corkscrew is THE most useless
feature of the SAK? I mean really. Why do they still include it in
almost every full featured knife. For the space it takes up on an SAK
I could think up 2 or 3 more tools I would much rather have.
One of those mysteries of life I guess.
They're from Europe where they drink a lot of wine.
They also sell to the French, who's (as far as I know) are a bunch of winos. :biggrin:

Oh ya ... and one more thing.
They need to invent a bloody SAK for CANADIANS!!!
Forget the slotted screwdriver entirely. Its useless.
What every Canadian needs is a #2 Robertson.
I should patent that right now and sell it to Victornox
as an International SAK model

Personal belief. -- any sealed object or device that
is not a robertson screw is just not worth opening.
Give me a hammer!
I tried using those #@#$%% Robertson screws when I was putting together a deck, thought the square hole would take a lot of torque without stripping out the head. They were awful, stripped out easy as pie, and once they stripped out you had to either break them off or use a pair of vice grips to get them out. I had to predrill most of the holes and they were still stripping out.

Finally got sick of it and bought some good old American Phillips head screws (insert patriotic music here).
-Didn't strip out as much (by a long shot) and most important, even if the head strips out you still have a good surface for the driver to back them out of the hole.

deadeye
2006-02-28, 09:26
I was on a nice day hike once, when a lovely young lass asked if by chance, I had a corkscrew?

I did.

I shared a wonderful lunch, with wine, with her and her (female) friends! :biggrin:

Since then, a can opener and corkscrew are required equipment on my SAK, and my SAK is standard equipment in my kit.

Verlager
2006-02-28, 21:31
.... I had to predrill most of the holes.

Finally got sick of it and bought some good old American Phillips head screws (insert patriotic music here).

Pre-drilling the holes with a slightly smaller diameter drill bit is a good idea, -greatly reduces the chance of splitting the wood and the deck screws go in straighter and deeper. I own about 3 cordless drills, 3 corded drills and 3 air drills, so I assume most guys here own at least two drills. Therefore, switching bits for screw-drivers in the drill chuck is not an issue.

But you go ahead and split your wood, if you prefer. I believe in the 5 'p's: Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance.

GregH
2006-02-28, 22:11
I need a heavy duty chopper, and a camp knife...
Your Swamp Rat Camp Tramp is a heavy duty chopper and camp knife. Both of those chores are what it was designed for. I have a Ratweiler which is basically the Camp Tramp with Micarta scales.
Take that baby out and knock down some trees. You'll be amazed, and delighted, at how well it performs.

Kea
2006-02-28, 22:21
I have a Gerber Ridge Knife that I got from WalMart for $15. Added to that a Spyderco Native for $40. The latter is razor sharp out of the box. I was able to shave my legs with it. ;)

Seeker
2006-02-28, 22:44
Kea! welcome back! where've you been? camping, hopefully...

Kea
2006-02-28, 23:14
All over Hell and back. On the treadmill in my boots when I can.

Going out to hike this weekend. Need to get my boot feet back on before I start the 7 and 8 milers(which is ambitious for me).

I do like my new knives. Darn things fell from the sky during the cold. :)

dropkick
2006-03-01, 01:59
Turk, I've got another possibility for you The Woodman's Pal machete. Might be just the ticket for you.
http://www.freeimghosting.com/images/dropkick/p1141191936622.jpg
The one in the picture above is 14 oz. and costs about $60.00
They also have other variations on the basic model.

Was sitting at the computer and I just remembered it.
While I haven't ever used one I've heard quite a few people give them rave reviews. At one time I came close to buying one, but decided to go with the hatchet/saw combo instead.

www.woodmanspal.com

Taken from their website:

The WOODMAN'S PALŪ machete is designed to trim, prune, chop, split, blaze trails, brush out lines, clear campsites, chop firewood, split kindling, build hunting blinds or lean-to-shelters.

The multipurpose Woodman's PalŪ machete can efficiently perform the tasks of many tools including machetes, axes, hatchets, pruning saws, pruning shears, pruning knives, bow saws, loppers, Bowie knives and for certain jobs, even chain saws.

Verlager
2006-03-01, 11:06
I have one of these Woodsman's Pal. The lousy heft of it makes it impossible to use as a weapon. It's a decent brush knife, and it could be used for gathering firewood, but I don't build fires. And I'd have to clear a lot of bush to justify carrying a tool weighing 23 oz. I prefer to leave the land undisturbed.

Lemming that I am, however, I bought one, thinking it might come in handy, carried it, and never used it. They have a 100% satisfaction guarantee, but I keep it around just cause....

you ever hear the story of the guy in NYC found eating his breakfast in a bare room with just a table and chair and bare light bulb, completely naked, except for a hat? They asked him, "Why are you eating breakfast in the nude?" "Oh", he replied, "Nobody ever comes to visit me." Then why are you wearing that hat?" "Oh, somebody might come." was the reply. That's kind of why I still have this tool.


Evidently, the military does not entirely share my belief about the tool being useless:

This new tool did not go unnoticed by the US Military. The Woodman's PalŪ or "LC-14-B" in military terms, was standard issue from the early part of World War II through Desert Storm. G.I.'s and the US Army Signal Corp. relied heavily on the Woodman's Pal for land clearing operations. At the time of the Vietnam War, the Woodman's PalŪ was designated the "Survival Tool, Type IV" and was issued in air crew survival kits.

Yeah, well, I say it's a:
great farmer's brush knife for clearing and cleaning up his land. Me, I got no farm.

Pretty darn good survivalist knife, useful for military, survivalists, shelter building, small site clearing.

Streamweaver
2006-03-01, 11:56
On a side note. Don't you think the corkscrew is THE most useless
feature of the SAK?

Actually I have found use for the corkscrew. I fish alot,so it comes in handy for clearing hook eyes of glue and paint on flies and jigs etc. I have also used it to make jet holes ,when making a soda can stove in the field(so it dont dull up the blade).Still I could live without it! :biggrin: