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dropkick
2006-04-14, 02:52
I was trying to think up some no cook meals I could take on quick trips, as I get tired of eating tuna on saltines, or p.b.& j.
Haven't had much luck thinking up anything wonderful.
Any suggestions?

jimtanker
2006-04-14, 09:44
I LOVE pepperoni. It keeps pretty well too. A little cheese and some crackers dont hurt either. Sunner sausage as well.

Ive heard of some people making a pasta salad using ramen? Not my cup of tea. Course I dont drink tea either. LOL

Seeker
2006-04-14, 12:58
pepperoni/hard salami, with block cheddar cheese and crackers are good.

if you can get hold of a german butcher, they make a sausage called landjaeger... it's like summer sausage, but the size of a flat hot dog. they're then double smoked, and will keep almost forever... they get hard after a few weeks, but are still safe to eat... i've heard of them being found, edible, after a year accidentally left in a hunting jacket pocket and forgotten about...

poptarts make a decent enough breakfast if you can deal with that fake-pastry taste. i hate them, but my kids love them.

canned meats, like spam, vienna sausages, of foil packets of chicken can be eaten cold too...

jimtanker
2006-04-14, 15:35
OH yea! I forgot about pop tarts. Thats the way I start my day on my tank. Strawberry poptart and a nice cold bottle of Mountain Dew and I'm ready for any pre dawn assault. Yum.

Mutinousdoug
2006-04-14, 15:48
I don't know about "wonderful" but tortillas are relatively light, hold up pretty well for a few days (better than white bread, not as well as say, dried fruit) and can be used as sandwich bread. I spread PB&J on one and roll it up for a snack. Cheeze or tuna (sardines, etc.) does as well.

SowthEfrikan
2006-04-14, 16:54
Try tortillas with sun dried tomatoes and ready-cooked bacon, and of course, a slice of cheddar cheese. *drool*

There are also sun-dried peppers, but haven't tried those yet.

There is of course beef jerky, but I am lucky enough to make my own biltong, which is far yummier.

Seeker
2006-04-14, 17:47
OH yea! I forgot about pop tarts. Thats the way I start my day on my tank. Strawberry poptart and a nice cold bottle of Mountain Dew and I'm ready for any pre dawn assault. Yum.

you know, i was going to mention mtn dew... only soft drink i know of that's still good even when it's hot... everything else tastes like crap unless it's cold... 'cept the dew... but i don't carry it camping...

we used to set a couple six packs out at night, in germany (cool even in summer)... in the morning, they went down into the smoke grenade launchers... a little water on the canvas covers ensured good cooling throughout the day... my platoon carried 20 cases (1 case and one six pack per man) for a two week exercise... that was 2 per man per day, plus an extra... nice life... sometimes we'd give the extra to an infantryman... you should've seen the look! they were convinced we had refrigerators on board... same thing with 'cooking' hot chow on the exhaust vent.. .even had a crew who made popcorn regularly (jiffy pop).

forgot to mention earlier, when i posted about canned meats and such... all of the MRE entrees are edible cold... not palatable, but edible... but they are fairly heavy. still, might be worth the stove/fuel payoff on a short trip.

dropkick
2006-04-14, 20:50
Try tortillas with sun dried tomatoes and ready-cooked bacon, and of course, a slice of cheddar cheese. *drool*

There are also sun-dried peppers, but haven't tried those yet.

There is of course beef jerky, but I am lucky enough to make my own biltong, which is far yummier.
What's biltong and how do you make it?

Take-a-knee
2006-04-15, 00:41
Biltong is dried and seasoned South African venison, usually one of many varieties of antelope or plains game they have over there. I've been told the best is made from Oryx or Gemsbock as they call them in S. Africa. Any of it will be much healthier than a lot of the luncheon meat crap that many of you guys have suggested, like summer sausauge and pepperoni. You are eating offal and floor scraps, only an evil accountant would consider feeding that shit to people.

deadeye
2006-04-15, 09:41
... all of the MRE entrees are edible cold... not palatable, but edible...

There are a few where I question the edibility... clam chowder and burrito come to mind as being particulary bland in appearance and taste. But some MRE's are really good, even if you're not starving: western beans, minestrone soup for two. Plus they come with other goodies like pumpkin bread, brownies, and applesauce. Yes, they're heavy, but a nice break from (here comes the sermon!) pop tarts and mountain dew and other JUNK FOOD that will eventually kill you. For a no-cook breakfast, try meusli (unsweetened) with powdered milk - essentially raw oatmeal with raisins & nuts. It might take you guys a while to get over your sweet tooth, though.

SowthEfrikan
2006-04-15, 10:10
And yes, back home you can get the exotic game stuff, but biltong is usually made of beef. We leave the game meats to tourists.

Basically buy a good cut of beef without much fat - London Broil - that is cut with the grain of the meat. Back home, cut it into about 2 inch strips. Cover it entirely with rock salt for 30 minutes (the longer you leave the meat, the saltier the final product). Dip into a bowl of apple cider vinegar to rinse off the salt and help cure the meat, but don't undo all your good work with the salt by letting it wetten again. Sprinkle with fresh ground coriander and fresh ground black pepper to taste. Hang in a biltong box to air dry - in Texas it's done in three, maybe four, days. The thicker the piece of meat, the longer it takes to cure. The biltong box also deals with the humidity here very well.

The biltong box is the part which is tricky. The dehydrators here just don't seem to do the job right, they seem to cook the meat instead of just letting it air dry. And biltong boxes aren't exactly sold here so you have to make your own.

Go to Lowes or Home Depot, buy a small cheap cupboard about waist height, a light fixture, bug mesh, hooks, and electric cord and cable/plug. Drill six holes about an inch big at the bottom sides of the cupboard, and six same-sized holes at the top. Staple mesh or stockings over the holes to keep bugs out. Fit the electric socket at the middle bottom of the cupboard, place in an ordinary 60 watt light bulb, and then hang the meat to dry from hooks at the top. Plug up the light and close door.

Some people also install a drip tray about a quarter way up (with holes at the edges to let the air circulate properly), but I find the rock salt dries the meat enough not to need one. The messiest bit is the spices which do come off.

Anyway, there are building instructions/plans on the net, google for : biltong box.

My husband built one for me when first I moved to the US and found myself with serious biltong deprivation, and the project took him only a couple of hours. Seven years later it still delivers.

Biltong is so loved by South Africans that customs the world over search our luggage for it. We know they eat it themselves. It really is superior to jerky in both flavour and texture, I find that I have to feed my husband and several of my friends and acquintances who now know about it.

Some people like it entirely dry, others like the meat to still be "wet" ie have a pinkish tinge in the center. To store, place into plastic bags in a cool, dry spot. Don't worry about storage much - it's eaten in record time. Be warned, biltong is addictive.

I hope some of you try this out - and if you do, that you will send me some. One can never have enough biltong. There are, I think, now several vendors that also sell it online, along with droe wors, which is a dried sausage of boerewors - a coarse sausage of lamb and beef with coriander and pepper spices.

SowthEfrikan
2006-04-15, 10:36
You are going to hate me but what can I do? We came up with this fantastic stuff because there was no refrigeration in a hot continent and we needed stuff that would last as we explored Africa. It is actually trail food, except we thought about it as a trek.

It's like a hard-baked bread/biscuit that you dunk in your tea or coffee for breakfast, muesli/buttermilk is my favourite. Yes, I know your mother told you never to dunk biscuits in your coffee, but we were wild people. Still are, actually.

I found this link that does a good job of explaining it, and you can find recipes on the Net: http://www.kalahariusa.com/article/595

All this talk of food before breakfast has made me ravenous.

Again, I hope that some of you try our South African foods out.

It's delicious, nutritious, and perfect for hiking.

Just Jeff
2006-04-15, 12:20
On the first day out, get a Subway sandwich with meat and cheese only. If it's cold out, get the tomatoes and lettuce in a sandwich bag and put it on the outside of the pack. Be sure to get the mayo packets and don't put it on the sandwich until you're ready to eat. Stick it down inside the pack and it'll be good for a first lunch or dinner.

Cold pizza works the same way, but it'll last to about day 2's lunch. If it's hot the cheese can separate, which makes it greasy...no big deal as long as it's in a plastic bag. Aluminum foil seems to keep it fresher, as long as you know it won't get really hot.

Some stores have dried vegetable packets. They're like the dried peas and corn that come in the ramen in cups. They're decent for snacks - just munch them like trail mix or something.

I like bagels or tortillas with cheese and sausage or with PBJ. Those little tuna salad or chicken salad packs taste pretty good (the ones where you mix the mayo and relish packets in)...just be sure to get the foil packet kind instead of the tin can b/c it's lighter.

Pop Tarts have been mentioned, but I also take sweet bagels for breakfast. Raisin and cinnamon is a pretty good flavor.

Some people like Nutella (sometimes with PB) instead of PBJ. I guess it's healthier than jelly and packed with calories, but I didn't like it enough to eat as a meal.

I've been looking for powdered hummus, too. I hear it makes a good tortilla spread when you put cheese on it.

Search for "moose goo". Haven't tried it yet, but I guess it's got a small cult following.

I also take fresh fruit on a lot of trips. I know it's heavy, but there's nothing like a fresh orange as a lunchtime pick-me-up. And the looks on your friends' faces when they smell the orange is priceless. Apples work ok when it's not too hot. Heat makes the cores turn brown...still taste fine, just have a soft core.

Boiled eggs can last for a few days in a pack, too. I don't know how heat affects them, though - may only be good for non-summer trips. I think they last longer if you leave the shell on until you eat them, but I don't that for sure. I leave the shell on...it's a tiny bit of garbage, and you can even eat the shells for extra calcium.

MREs have been mentioned - bringing along the chemical heater packs is a pretty lightweight way to warm the entrees. Sometimes I bring them for a hot lunch even though I also have a stove. Quick and easy. Just set the used heater pack in the sun so you don't have to carry the extra water weight.

And then the regular assortment of trail mix, candy bars, etc.

Regarding the heat messing up foods, body heat can make an internal frame pack pretty hot, too. If it's an average day, say in the 80s, your food bag might get hotter in the middle of your pack than on the outside. Sometimes I make sure any fruit, pizza or sandwiches are on the far edge of my food bag to give it a little more insulation between it and my back. Helps keep block cheese from separating, too. If the food is cold and you have space in your pack, wrapping the food in your sleeping bag and letting it loft a little can help keep it cool, too (just make sure it won't leak on your bag).

That's mainly what I use...I like no-cook lunches, but usually have a stove for dinners even on overnighters. Hope you find some of it useful!

Seeker
2006-04-15, 13:16
Yes, they're heavy, but a nice break from (here comes the sermon!) pop tarts and mountain dew and other JUNK FOOD that will eventually kill you.

when i was 22/23, i could live for 2-3 days on nothing but mtn dew and chips ahoy cookies... no sleep, no mres... what a high! but what a crash afterwards... i quit doing that after i got a staff job!

so biltong is truly air dried jerky, vs 'cooked' (albeit a low temp) in a dehydrator? is that how it's different from jerky? i made a batch of jerky once and air dried it in front of a fan in the middle of winter here in LA... w/temps in the 40s... took about 18 hours to dry... definitely a different taste...

and that biscuit thing sounds suspiciously like german Springerle... wonder if there's a connection... they're a christmas cookie at my mom's house... biscuitish dough, but with anise flavoring. mom rolled 'em about a half inch thick and then ran over them again with a decorative rolling pin that marked off little 2'' squares and a pattern/design in each box that then transferred to the cookie... they sat out and air dried for a day or two then she baked them. ROCK hard... you couldn't eat them without dunking them in a cup of hot coffee. but they were pretty tasty after that...

regarding landjaeger, it most definately is not floor scraps... it's hand made with good beef. the summer sausage that's commercially made, yeah, maybe you're right... but if you've got a real german butcher, where they still make everything right there in the shop, you're in luck... roughly $2 a piece for the little landjaeger, but worth it...

blackdog
2006-04-15, 14:54
The biltong box is the part which is tricky. The dehydrators here just don't seem to do the job right, they seem to cook the meat instead of just letting it air dry. And biltong boxes aren't exactly sold here so you have to make your own.

Anyway, there are building instructions/plans on the net, google for : biltong box.
Put quotation marks around the phrase and you get better hits from google. -> "biltong box"

There's a solar dehydrator (http://www.littlecolorado.org/solar.htm) that might work for biltong (with some modifications of course).

Anyway, i'm taking the biltong idea to a friend of mine that dries reindeer meat. Let's see what he does with it. Lateral thinking is fun. ...and really delicious at times.

BTW, do you know anything about +Khomani, a language spoken in the southern parts of Kalahari?

JAK
2006-04-16, 03:02
A big 500g chunk of dates works well, along with a heavy hunk of crusty bread.
Of course you still have to drink a lot of water.

Iceman
2006-04-17, 01:45
You are eating offal and floor scraps, only an evil accountant would consider feeding that shit to people.


Mmmm, Offal.........sounds like a hotdog to me! Pass the mustard! :biggrin:

Buggyman
2006-04-17, 16:45
Just wanted to mention that fussbudget chef Alton Brown of the food network has a method of making jerky with a furnace filter (cloth not fiberglass) and a box fan. Go to foodnetwork.com and access Alton Brown or his show "Good Eats" for the recipie.

dropkick
2006-04-18, 02:07
Mmmm, Offal.........sounds like a hotdog to me! Pass the mustard! :biggrin:
I'm more than half Scottish, and offal is the National dish.
Iceman and I'll sit around and eat hotdogs and haggis.

Iceman
2006-04-18, 10:03
Looking back over the years, considering all of the unusual, bizarre, or grotesque things I have eaten has helped me to understand something...It is not what you eat that will kill you, but the quantity.

Take for instance, one time I scooped up shrimp pot bait that lay on the deck of the boat for many hours after clearing our shrimp pots. Scooped it right up with a cracker. Held it to my mouth in front of my dads buddy, he says "you wouldn't!" I did. This story is told by that friend every shrimp season. :biggrin:

Or the time a barbeque caterer was dismantling a barbqued pig at a party I attended. Thinking he was cute, the caterer made an offer to the crowd. "Hey for twenty five bucks and a beer, I will eat a pigs eye out of the skull...." Standing nearby, I exclaimed "Hell, I'll do it for free." The caterer got no beer that day. After watching me dig the eye out and eat it, my friend stepped up and said "I'll have the other..." Later he said he didn't know what came over him, but after watching me gulp down the pigs eye with panache', he just had to join in.

My point is, well I don't know what my point is..., something about eating gross stuff, oh yeah now I remember...

If a nasty hot dog hasn't killed me yet, a few more ain't going to either.

And yes, this thread has really degraded, sorry.

Just Jeff
2006-04-18, 12:28
...I scooped up shrimp pot bait that lay on the deck of the boat for many hours after clearing our shrimp pots. Scooped it right up with a cracker...

I'm going to vomit.

Seeker
2006-04-18, 18:57
obviously too used to good air force chow... :biggrin:

SowthEfrikan
2006-04-18, 20:32
Hi Blackdog

No, I don't. I think you are speaking about a language spoken by what remains of a people once known as bushmen, and since then as san and khoisan. The names keep changing. For a flick, see The Gods Must Be Crazy.

Anyway, these people were pretty much wiped out by black and white settlers as they moved into the area. They were a very peaceful lot - like the Tibetans - and suffered the same fate of genocide, except it wasn't called that in those days. They had no concept of property, if there was an animal around it was there to eat, and this drove the settlers crazy as they would kill herd animals. Anyway, the survivors number in the thousands.

I studied linguistics while at varsity and a prof of mine was an expert in the click language. A few words - by way of reparation - have been added to the crest of South Africa, but I have no idea what they mean.

These people were expert trackers and many still are, but modern society has pretty much destroyed what remains of their way of life and many are living in the most squalid of conditions, largely ignored by the people who once hunted and killed them. If anyone in the country has cause to complain, it is this group. Sir Laurence van der Post mentioned that his father went on a party that killed the last survivors in the Drakensberg. One of these people was an artist, and he was found with his paints.

There we go. That's a summary of the little I know.

Just Jeff
2006-04-18, 23:52
obviously too used to good air force chow... :biggrin:

AF food isn't so bad (always better than what infantry gets in the field, admittedly), but the two best chow halls I've seen were both Army. In Qatar, we used to make the weekly trip to As Saliyah for the steak, lobster and crab legs. And eleventeen different kinds of pie and cake with ice cream. It was a great trip because there was a patch of trees along the way...something green to remind us of home.

The other one was the 3/75 Ranger chow at Benning. They feed those bubbas well.

Take-a-knee
2006-04-19, 00:37
ANY mess hall (DFAC they call them now) that is patronized by Field Grade Officers, in Iraq is better than any military chow I've seen in 21 years. The one at Camp Victory near Uday's palace is an example. However, a friend of mine was working for the State Dept at Ramadi (a Marine Base) and they fed them corndogs (there go those damned hot dogs again) 3 days a week. Yes, this thread has deteriorated.

dropkick
2006-04-19, 01:15
Just wanted to mention that fussbudget chef Alton Brown of the food network has a method of making jerky with a furnace filter (cloth not fiberglass) and a box fan. Go to foodnetwork.com and access Alton Brown or his show "Good Eats" for the recipie.
Took a while but I found this. I'm going to give it a try.
I thought I might try making biltong with the below set up too.

Beef Jerky
Recipe courtesy Alton Brown, 2005
See this recipe on air Tuesday Apr. 25 at 11:00 PM ET/PT.


Recipe Summary
Difficulty: Expert
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Inactive Prep Time: 8 hours
Cook Time: 12 hours
Yield: 10 to 12 ounces
User Rating: 5 Stars


1 1/2 to 2 pounds flank steak
2/3 cup Worcestershire sauce
2/3 cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon honey
2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons onion powder
1 teaspoon liquid smoke
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Special Equipment: 1 box fan, 4 paper air-conditioning filters, and 2 bungee cords

Trim the flank steak of any excess fat, place in a zip-top bag, and place it in the freezer for 1 to 2 hours in order to firm up.

Remove the steak from the freezer and thinly slice the meat with the grain, into long strips.

Place the strips of meat along with all of the remaining ingredients into a large, 1-gallon plastic zip-top bag and move around to evenly distribute all of the ingredients. Place the bag into the refrigerator for 3 to 6 hours.

Remove the meat from the brine and pat dry. Evenly distribute the strips of meat onto 3 of the air filters, laying them in the grooves and then stacking the filters on top of one another. Top these with 1 empty filter. Next, lay the box fan on its side and lay the filters on top of it. Strap the filters to the fan with 2 bungee cords. Stand the fan upright, plug in and set to medium. Allow the meat dry for 8 to 12 hours. If using a commercial dehydrator, follow the manufacturer's directions.

Once dry, store in a cool dry place, in an airtight container for 2 to 3 months.

Episode#: EA0901
Copyright 2003 Television Food Network, G.P., All Rights Reserved

SowthEfrikan
2006-04-25, 17:54
The marinade sounded a bit complicated, but the method - air drying - is exactly right.

SGT Rock
2006-04-28, 03:12
Yes, the chow halls all have different standards. We get corn dogs every day here at chow (not that I eat them) but at least you can go in anytime day or night and make a sandwich - good for coming in at 0400 after a raid and getting a quick meal. On the other hand you can go to MNSTC-I mess hall and eat off real plates with silverwear while getting to-order stir fry cooked for you. Heck, the chow hall at Phoniex academy had linnen tablecloths and napkins for the permanant-party guys. Us slugs ate off disposable plates LOL.

In all, almost everywhere I have been here now is better than what I left at Camp Marlboro in 2004.

Jim Henderson
2014-10-17, 14:58
I'll have to try Biltong. Sounds pretty easy. For now I make jerky and smoked fish and meat with my Big Chief smoker. Does a great job.

I love soft smoke jery, ie jerky that isn't fully dried, but soft and chewy. I don't know how long it lasts since my kids pretty much eat whatever I make in a few days.

As far as eyeballs go, you haven't lived in Latino neighborhoods, have you. A specialty is Cabeza, Spanish for "Head". When I was a boy and sometimes still, you would find Whole skinless Sheeps head in the meat section. Eyeballs, tongue the whole enchilada. My friend's dad use to roast up a Cabeza every once in awhile and serve it up for dinner. The meat is just meat but whenever my friend's dad said "Jaime, how about un Ojo(Eyeball)" He would hold one up on a fork and when I refused he would pop it in his mouth and chew happily. To this day about the only things I might eat on purpose with eyeballs is sardines.

Good times.

Jim Henderson