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dropkick
2006-04-14, 03:23
Anyone tried one of these setups?
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-3/1165284/pacsafe_85.jpg
They don't weigh a whole lot (largest size 1lb 9oz) and could give some ease of mind. I'm thinking about getting one for air travel.

Fits pack volume
pacsafe 55 : 25-55L / 1550-3400 in³
pacsafe 85 : 55-85L / 3400-5200 in³
pacsafe 120: 75-120L / 4600-7300 in³
pacsafe 140: 100-140L / 6000-8500 in³
For travellers with external gear (sleeping bag, tent, etc.) secured to outside of their pack, then add approximately 1000 in³ / 16L per item to the total pack volume.

www.pac-safe.com
www.rei.com/online/store/Search?storeId=8000&query=*&cat=4501756&vcat=REI_SEARCH:C
www.walkabouttravelgear.com/pacsafe.htm

scarecrow
2006-04-14, 05:43
Its all well and good if you can afford $64.95 for something you'll rarely use, but how about this?:

https://www.ownercentre.com/au/media/product1-image1

TamperTell (https://www.ownercentre.com/au/tampertell)

"TamperTell is a tamper evident security seal, perfect for use on luggage while you're traveling. Use TamperTell seals on zippers, and if they are missing when you retrieve your baggage, you know someone has opened/tampered with your luggage."

"What are the advantages of using TamperTell compared with a cable tie?

Cable ties have a single click lock that can be released with a sharp object, unlike TamperTell's advanced double-sided click-lock system. Cable ties require a sharp knife or scissors (which are banned on aeroplanes) to cut open, preventing you from accessing your luggage. Cable ties are commonly available, are not uniquely identifiable and can therefore be easily replaced without your knowledge. TamperTell seals have their own unique number so you can be instantly aware if your luggage has been tampered with."

Cheers,

blackdog
2006-04-14, 08:58
When i went to south america last year, my bag had its zippers tied with small pieces of cord. At first sight it seemed like pull-cords, but as someone among the ground crew found out, the two main double zippers were actually tied together with fancy knotting. Cutting the cord would be pretty easy, but it would have shown the tampering. Untying the knotting would be easy too, but making an indentical knot apparently was too much. One knot was partially opened, but the packing inside was untouched.

Cable ties in strange colours or marked somehow would work as seals too, but i liked the cord variant as it was reusable. The cheaper the solution looks the safer the content of the bag is. The sad fact is that expensive-looking stuff will be stolen. Even an armoured safe used as a backpack will be stolen and cracked.

The below excerpt is from an old chinese book. You'll understand why i include it in my post...

From the I-ching (Hexagram 40 line 3):

If a man carries a burden on his back and nonetheless rides in a carriage,
He thereby encourages robbers to draw near. Perseverance leads to humiliation.
This refers to a man who has come out of needy circumstances in to comfort and freedom from want. If now, in the manner of an upstart, he tries to take his ease in comfortable surroundings that do not suit his nature, he thereby attracts robbers. If he goes on thus he is sure to bring disgrace upon himself.

MacGyver
2006-04-14, 09:04
That wouldn't be a bad idea for air travel, especially if you have a pack that doesn't zip. On the trail it's certainly not worth it to me, as I keep it with me and am not concerned about it disappearing.

Regards,
-MacGyver
GA-->ME

jimtanker
2006-04-14, 09:41
Except for that on any airtravel now day (in the US anyways) your bags are subject to search at any time. They could cut any of that stuff and say nothing to you. Then at thier leasure they can take what they want out. A freind of mine had a leptop taken out of thier luggage and she was left hanging. "Not our fault that it wasnt secured." was the airlines message.

F#$% the airlines, take a train.

blackdog
2006-04-14, 11:20
A friend of mine had a laptop taken out of thier luggage and she was left hanging. "Not our fault that it wasn't secured." was the airlines message.
This is exactly why i bought a 1.5kg fujitsu. It fit nicely in the dayskin carry-on, even with the 5kg limit that Varig enforces.

The advice (http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=881) i got from the people of this place and onebag.com (http://www.onebag.com) made my trip a nice experience.

Onebag suggested keeping the computer in the carry-on and i'll recommend that too.

On my way home i used a huge duffle bag as the check-in (as Top suggested) and it's a keeper. Heavy super-strong fabric, more than 80 liters of volume and a bullet-proof closing. ...and it still weighs in well lighter than a suitcase. It's the B-2 of travel bags - very stealthy.

One more thing... My bags aren't marked with my name, they're marked with an URL. On the homepage there's instructions on how to treat my bag and where to send it if it gets lost. A friend has copied the idea and has lost/retrieved his bag twice so far. ...and I didn't come up with the idea, found it on the net, but the original page is gone.

Jim Henderson
2006-04-14, 12:53
Tying or locking the zippers together is not effective.

Years ago the banks used to use zipper bags to transport documents and money. They locked the zippers together thinking the bags were secure. Nope, eventually they discovered that you can unzip the bag without unlocking the zippers. You just work the teeth of the zipper thru the sliders and slowly open up the zipper. Quite easy to do.

So don't trust a zipper tie or lock. A smart thief knows how to get around these and it isn't hard to do. Besides a knife is also an effect unzipper.

I like the steel mesh idea, but anyone with a set of diagonal cutters can chew thru steel cable if it isn't something like 1/8th inch or thicker. It may take awhile tho unles the thief is prepared.

Just some ideas. Like the old saying goes, locks just keep honest people honest. The swine thieves will get you every time if they have time and some cover.

Jim Henderson

...Joe...
2006-04-14, 14:07
Judging by the other posts and my own experience, air travel appears to be a case of damnedifyoudo, damnedifyoudon't. If you don't secure your luggage, it makes it easier (read less convenient) for thiefs. Or you could have my experience where my luggage was misrouted, and when I got it back it was taped closed and had a label informing me that the lock had been broken by airline security for a check since it was an unaccompanied piece of luggage. Flyer beware!

dropkick
2006-04-14, 21:10
Scarecrow,
I don't understand how having the zippers secured with a zip tie would benefit me.
My knowing more quickly that someone has broken in to my bag isn't going to return anything that was stolen or make the airlines admit liability more quickly.
My thought with the mesh is that it would keep out casual thieves (luggage handlers, passers by) and would allow me to secure the bag to something, if I was away from it at a terminal or bus station for a short time (bathroom, etc.).
- Also if I decided to go swimming while on the trail.

john pickett
2006-04-16, 19:56
Just a thought,
What if you placed your pack in a military style duffle bag and simply locked the duffle. It would look more like some grunts skivvies than your hiking stuff.
John Pickett

jimtanker
2006-04-16, 20:24
If you packed that duffle like that an put a lock on it here in the States they would break your lock to get to your bag.

TSA/homeland insecurity says "no locks on bags."

Take-a-knee
2006-04-16, 21:58
In some airports you have the option of getting the TSA screeners to open and check your bags, I did this in O'hare. They put their own official metal tag on it after they check it and the screener allowed me to put my padlocks on the duffels. I had missed my connecting flight and had to spend the night so the screeners allowed me to do this since my bags had to sit in the "system" all night.

scarecrow
2006-04-17, 02:59
Scarecrow,
I don't understand how having the zippers secured with a zip tie would benefit me.
My knowing more quickly that someone has broken in to my bag isn't going to return anything that was stolen or make the airlines admit liability more quickly.
My thought with the mesh is that it would keep out casual thieves (luggage handlers, passers by) and would allow me to secure the bag to something, if I was away from it at a terminal or bus station for a short time (bathroom, etc.).
- Also if I decided to go swimming while on the trail.

Dropkick, all your points are valid. Really I didn't think into too much detail there, but yes, if you did need to leave your bag somewhere, Zip Ties will do nothing to stop a theif pilfering your bag.

I was really going on a cost based ideal, and the idea I had was that for airline travel zip ties with individual serials would suffice because if they were tampered with, and you needed to prove a case in court that you weren't smuggling drugs or other crap (i.e.: what Chapelle Corby (http://theage.com.au/news/Corby-Case/Judges-say-Corby-charges-proven/2005/05/27/1117129868479.html) didn't have for her defence), you could do that.

So in conclusion, if you intend to use it for more than just air travel, I'm all for it, after all, its your decision in the end :).

Cheers,

squeaky
2006-04-17, 03:02
The TSBA has come up with locks that they have codes for and can get into while still keeping your bags safe from all non-TSBA staff.

Keys By Code Website (http://www.keysbycode.com/product.php?productid=16247&cat=0&page=1&featured)