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View Full Version : Put up, or shut up!



Iceman
2006-05-13, 10:08
:biggrin: OK, here is the deal. If you plan a couple of hikes this summer/fall, put it in writing here. Then we can all hold you accountable for the trip/s.

My summer hiking plans;

1. Shed antler hiking trip. Destination; central Washington State. Starting Elevation is 4000'. Up and down and up and down and up and down...until I get a bunch of shed antlers.Unknown trip distance or elevation gain. Go till my legs won't go no more...No trail here...Sleep in my solo tent. (real exciting trip... :confused: ) I admit it, I am a bit wierd....

2. Take the family/kids Pacific Crest Trail, 7 miler round trip. Starting Elevation 4500'. 3.5miles in, 900' gain. Kids third backcountry fishing overnighter, tents....

3. Rattlesnake roundup. Eastern Washington State, elevation 2000-3000'. See how many snakes I can put the hurt on. Maybe eat one or two. This is another up and down-ey kind of trip designed to burn a bit of fat off of me, and get my lungs in shape for fall hunting season...hot too, probably in the 90's-100degrees. No kids here. I may wear my snake chaps, which run a bit hot when it is over 80 degrees.

4. Olympic Forest Death Slide trip. (JimTanker, I am going to try this one again..!) Olympic National Forest area, hike/scramble/plow/claw my way into a unique geological formation where a cluster of small deep lakes sits atop a narrow ridge. Very cool. I have aerial photos and I have mapped the spot, but have not put my eyeballs on these lakes yet. Talked with an old timer who used to go in and fish... Forest service advises against this trip... :biggrin: Last effort was with a buddy, we got stuck on the steep 2 mile approach to the lakes. Took 9 hours to get back to our starting point due to no marked trail, GPS doesn't work (too steep), had to use an altimeter to track our elevation in order to get back to our starting point...Steep, impassible ravines and chutes clogged with scree, brush, downed trees..... I can't wait! Bring trout rod, butter and frypan. Solo tent. Last year I cut and marked about 2/3 of the way in but ran out of time.

I am planning a few more, but havent made any final decisions on them yet.. will add later....

What are your plans? Put up, or.................!

SowthEfrikan
2006-05-13, 10:44
Last weekend, walked Lake Ray Roberts' Johnson Unit paths near Sanger - hiking and bicycling, a bit over eight miles. Very pleasant, civilized primitive campsites with a fire pit. Oh, and we got to hear the mythological "Bigfoot," but enough about that nonsense later. Easy, easy walking in lovely woods and wildflower meadows. Good for breaking in reluctant spouses and sniveling children.

Next weekend, Dinosaur Park beyond Fort Worth, about 12 miles I believe.

After that, Bar H ranch near St. Jo, about 7 miles in total along their bicycle paths. I expect it to be easy, too.

And then it's off to OKlahoma's Beavers Bend and the David Boren trail, about 16 miles that might be a bit more a challenge, but I know nothing about it.

Those are just the hikes I plan with my spouse within striking distance of the DFW / NE Texas area in the next two months. We have a regular little 5 miler called Coyote Run at Cooper Lake if we only have a few hours to spare.

There will be hikes to Ouchita (fantastic backpacking through wooded mountains) and other places by the hiking group that I will join, too. Probably a kayaking trip on the San Marcos, too.

Kea
2006-05-13, 12:23
Noting that I already completed the AT from HF to Keyes Gap, Weverton Cliffs, Sky Meadows State Park, already.

1. Ziler Loop Trail in Cacapon State Park, near Berkeley Springs, WV. 7.1 miles. October 21, 2006

2. Signal Knob Loop in Fort Valley, VA. 10.7 miles, overnight.

3. AT from Keyes Gap to Snickers Gap. 13.4 miles, overnight. Not yet scheduled.

4. Slippery Rock Gorge, Slippery Rock, PA 6.1 miles.

5. Tibbet Knob, GWNF. 3.1 miles. Not yet scheduled.

6. Tuscarora Trail from Gore, VA to Capon Springs. Something like 15 miles, overnight.

7. G. R. Thompson Wilflife Refuge, near Paris, Virginia.

jimtanker
2006-05-13, 14:01
Well, lets see. I either ruck 6 or 12 miles once a week with a 45 pound ruck and run at least 16 miles a week. Recovering from a stress fracture on one of the long toe bones right now. Sux.

Iceman - wish I were going with you on your trip. Have fun for me. :elefant:

KLeth
2006-05-14, 02:25
July 15 day trip to Greenland starting with 11 day hike in the wildernes south-west of Kangerlussuaq. - Roaming free with the muskoxen . . . .

Else just 15-30km trips almost every sunday :)

dropkick
2006-05-14, 05:08
Tomorrow I plan to walk about 4 miles into the Bitteroot National Forest and back out using the Bear Creek Trail. I've never been on this trail before, but it's close to where I'm going for a family dinner tomorrow.

Monday I plan to get up and maybe do something.

These are my current extended plans for the summer.

j.johnson
2006-05-14, 07:15
I just completed my first hike of the season in Kunsan South Korea, I'm coming home in about 3 weeks all my stuff has been picked up by TMO (traffic management office) to be shipped back to the states after my year in Korea with the Air Force. Anyway my boss and I did about a 7 mile hike in the hills near Kunsan AB ROK. The hike started pretty easy out the back gate on hard surface for about 1 1/2 miles to the base of the hill we found a trail. The trail had about a 1000 foot elavation from top to bottom, while on the trail we passed several old grave sites. The top looked like it could have been a helicopter landing pad and there were defensive fighting possitions all up the trail and concentrated at the top of the hill. All in all we had a great time the weather was about 75 deg. and sunny best weekend this year for South Korea.

deadeye
2006-05-14, 22:58
Ok, big guy, you're on, and we all win. This year's plans:

1. Hike Vermont's Long Trail in 21 days. I've section hiked all of it once, most of it twice, but never thru-hiked it in one shot. Tried last year, but a bum knee stopped me short.

2. Tick off 4 more Adirondack 46ers (the original 4,000 foot summits of NY's Adirondack Mts.) That'll get me to #29.

3. 6 full days of trail work (1 down, 5 to go)

See you in October! :beerglass:beerglass:beerglass

p.s. I'll invite my brother and sons every time because... well just because. :biggrin:

dgrav
2006-05-15, 09:11
Besides a bunch of weekend backpacking trips these are the three big ones this year.

1.) AT PA/MD border to VA

2.) White mountains in August. Not sure what hikes, maybe the Presidential traverse

3.) Paria river slot canyon in October (I may have to ditch the hammock on this one)

JAK
2006-05-15, 22:39
OK, this may be a bit lame but I need to break out of some funk. Fundy Footpath before the end of the July 1st weekend. Also, a day hike with my daughter at least every other weekend between now and then.

Best wishes to you all, and have a great summer.

SowthEfrikan
2006-05-24, 20:54
Are we supposed to report back on this? We completed Dinosaur Park and it was simply lovely. The trails were very backcountry and empty, we only faced annoying daytrippers close to the trail head. And, of course, they were also all over the dinosaur track areas. For those wanting to camp, be sure to book well in advance - the place is hugely popular. Also, call ahead to check on weather - you may not be able to ford the river to the trails if it has been raining hard.

Frolicking Dino
2006-05-24, 21:37
For now, the plan is to try to do the section from Unicoi Gap to Dick's Creek Gap this year and possibly some of the AT in or near Maryland (we have promised to visit my brother-in-law in MD.) If this goes well, we may do more sections.

We also plan to try to go to Virgin Falls in the Savage Gulf area this fall after the snakes go in and before any ice forms. The area is really snaky according to my brother and I'm not agile enough to deal with snakes in a boulder field just yet.

We have promised a grandson we will hike from Clingmans' dome to NewFound Gap with him. He is having health problems and so this is on hold for now.

jimtanker
2006-05-24, 22:18
I just camped out in my hammock monday night at the range. Was a nice clear night. Lots of mosquitoes out. I only got a few bites on my right arm/side because I was off of my pad when I rolled over one time. I slept better that night than I sleep in my bed here at home. No hiking though. Gonna have to fix that part.

Take-a-knee
2006-05-25, 20:07
Jimtanker, spray your hammock with permethrin and that'll keep the skeeters away. You can get the stuff for free man, unless you have a loser supply SGT.

jimtanker
2006-05-25, 22:08
I wouldnt even know where our supply is. Im in a Division HQ G-3 shop. Ive never worked higher than platoon level b4.

Redleg
2006-05-29, 00:45
Yet again we tried to make it into the wilderness area, My son and I were packed and ready to rumble. AND it SNOWED.

oops, sorry about the fon yelling, but It Snowed.

Well, mabyso next weekend.
Better luck to the rest of you.
grumble
jaf

lfotto
2006-06-02, 11:46
I have hike three times so far on North Country Trail, Central New York, approx. 16 miles. Scheduled for Sawtooth Mountain Range from Aug 3 through 6 starting from Stanley, Idaho (6200 elevation). First Time for this area so I am really looking forward to it. I hiked the 20 Mile Trail north of McCall Idaho in the '81 and it was great.

ktrout01
2006-06-09, 08:45
I've covered the 52 miles of AT in CT several times but never in one hike. I'm planning on doing that this summer. I'm setting aside 4 days so I can take my time and enjoy it rather than blazing through.

dropkick
2006-06-10, 03:18
I've covered the 52 miles of AT in CT several times but never in one hike. I'm planning on doing that this summer. I'm setting aside 4 days so I can take my time and enjoy it rather than blazing through.
I agree with that size of hike. The furthest I ever want to hike (to reach a destination) in a day is 15 miles, and I'm happier near or under 10. Any further and I normally don't enjoy myself.

SowthEfrikan
2006-06-11, 09:31
It's getting to be just about too hot to hike in the South, so this is one of the last until fall.The trail is at Beavers Bend in Okla. and it was far more strenuous than I expected, managing to find it's way over several miniature mountains. Fortunately it crossed a few streams where we were able to cool off, but the ticks were something else. I have never seen so many before. We made camp and were going to continue the next day, but the forest duff was really thick and every few minutes we were removing more ticks, so decided to hike out along the road that evening. Don't bring a tent for this hike, there are very few level places. If we go back we will hike from the other direction to cover the portion we missed.

dgrav
2006-06-11, 17:04
Leaving for PenMar tomorrow. Heading south on the AT, our ride picks us up on Friday in Harpers Ferry. There is a good chance we'll do an aditional 20 miles or so into VA., then back track to HF.

ripvanarkie
2006-06-12, 13:30
Hey folks, new guy here. Well, I have already completed two of five planned trips for this year. I started January 1st with a four day trip into the Leatherwood Wilderness Area. We set our base camp 4 miles into the heart of this area (as the crow flies). From there we made 10-15 mile day hikes from camp each day. The sights are awesome as the terrain is some of the roughest you will find in Arkansas (that's why I like it so much). We found several old mines and some rock cairns, we plan to go back and try to make sense of these markers later this year. With me was my brother in law who has been Army and Army Guard since Desert Shield, and two other friends, one a Vietnam vet (C-130 Crewchief) and his eldest son. We had a wonderful time and learned quickly that we had carried in much more than we needed. We decided to make this trip every year.

Second trip was in March. We went back to the Leatherwood, actually, we entered about half way E/W at the northern border of this area and hiked south and west until we were in the Buffalo River National Park. This was a four day trip with myself, my father, brother and brother in law along with seven of our children ages 5-12. The hike itself was four miles to base camp then three miles round trip to the Buffalo River where we went fossil hunting and fishing for rock bass. All the kids had a wonderful time and can't wait to go on the next trip!

We have a few other trips in the planning stage, the greatest of which will circle 3/4 of the Leatherwood W.A. This will be a thru hike starting on the Ozark Highland Trail at Spring Creek Trail Head, then to Moccasin Spring, then to Brush Creek where we will enter the Leatherwood W.A. on its eastern border. We will then hike west through the Leatherwood into the Buffalo River Nat. Park. We will follow the river south to Spring Creek and follow it back to our starting point. This will be a six day hike (no children, no whiners).

Glad to have found this site! It is top notch!

Later,
RipVanArkie :coffee:

Iceman
2006-06-13, 10:22
Ripvanarkie, welcome aboard. Sounds like you get out and have some fun. Great to hear you are involving the kids. Hope to hear more of your trips.

Rosaleen
2006-06-16, 07:55
jimtanker-

If you can't connect with your supply SGT, it is worth your while to get some permethrin from a local retailer. Walmart has it in the camping area with bug repellants. The one I find is "Permanone" and says on the can for gear or equipment or whatever, indicating that it is not for skin application.

Rosaleen

Rosaleen
2006-06-16, 08:02
Here's my plan-

Head for nephew's Alabama wedding, then hike Springer to Fontana Dam. I'm hoping the middle aged body holds up. If there is anything left in me, I may try I-40 to Hot Springs. I hiked the Smokies last summer, so this would give me the whole section south of Spivey Gap, NC, hiked once.

I've assured folks here I will try to come back without a concussion this time. I'm leaving as soon as school gets out next week.

Rosaleen

Frolicking Dino
2006-06-16, 10:07
Dinos made the following hikes in the past week:

* Cabin Creek Trail (1.9 miles) and Rhododendron Loop Trail (2.5 miles) in Grayson Highlands State Park, VA. The Rhododendron Trail goes up Wilburn Ridge - the home of Grayson's wild ponies. Many of the mares had very young ponies with them - all less than a week old - and several are term pregnant. If you live near the area, it would be a wonderful time to go there.

* We hiked about a mile to the Falls on Stony Creek near Abingdon, VA.

* We also hiked to Gentry Creek Falls in Laurel Bloomery, TN (outside of Damascus VA on Highway 91 South). LWolf told us about this beautiful place (thank you, Wolf - I owe you one). It is 6 miles (round trip) of real wildness trail with 22 creek crossings - all about knee deep in swift water, several boulder fields, several sections with slippery moss covered rocks, a few sections where you hike in a running stream bed (about 4" of water) and lots of muddy sections. It was the perfect place for the female dino to see just what she could do in a variety of rough hiking conditions. We stopped to confirm we were on the right road and spoke with a local farmer who advised us there are hundreds of rattlers in the area. We didn't see any, but the female dino did make sure to make lots of noise so we wouldn't surprise any snakes.

SowthEfrikan
2006-06-25, 19:44
You have the cutest name I have seen on any discussion board. How did you come up with it?

Frolicking Dino
2006-06-25, 20:33
You have the cutest name I have seen on any discussion board. How did you come up with it? Thanks. :) Back in spring of 2004, we started our section hike from Springer. As we met people on the trail, they would ask for our trail name. We said we didn't have one - we were just a couple of happy dinosaurs frolicking down the trail. Soon people who encountered us starting asking if we were the frolicking dinosaurs they'd heard were on the trail - and we became the frolicking dinosaurs.

Our grandchildren have called us the dinosaurs for years. Frolicking dinosaurs really does fit us. We have a lot of fun no matter where we go.

Gecko
2006-06-27, 08:18
In Pennsylvania, hiking can be planned across a pretty vast continuum. Either the AT which is about 45 minutes from the house, various trails like the Horseshoe Trail and the Loyalsock Trail, or some local hikes. Very locally is our 7 mile hike in Valley Forge Park every Thursday with the AMC. We generally do Mt. Misery and Mt. Joy, and it's no easy rolling hill, trust me. I think I cracked a bone in my foot the last time. But that won't keep me home. >^,^< It's a nice evening trail for training with a full pack to do longer backpacking trips.

In September/October I'm putting together a large group backpack on the entire Loyalsock Trail, about 59 miles over 6 days. I did 27 miles of it in two and a half days and it was too brutal and difficult to see anything more than my boots that trip. This time I want to get into camp earlier after enjoying the trail, and do a little more grubbing for local edibles for a nice evening dinner of fresh PA vegies and shrooms.

And if the humidity fries off this weekend I will get back to finishing the NJ AT sections I haven't done yet. We went from NJ into NY last weekend and the New Jersey State Bird about chewed my arms off (skeeters!). I was fine in my HH with a fleece, but had forgotten my bug repellant and was getting eaten alive during the day. It was step, stop, smack the whole way. This time I'll go out locked and loaded. I'll get the basteerds...

:bawling:

SowthEfrikan
2006-06-27, 20:08
What a lovely way to get a name, Frolicking Dino(s). :)


****

Anyway, hiked Lake Tawakoni this weekend. Eww. Don't bother. Pretty enough, but what a bore. Virtually flat, just a couple of miles, I swear a wheelchair could run it at high speed. Grumbled all the way home. The state park maps made it look longer, don't they know some of us travel miles, eager to hike, on their information? And ugh, the neighbouring towns, what an embarrassment. Still, live and learn. I'll never return. *Grumble grumble*

jimtanker
2006-06-30, 17:28
I did about a 4 Km hike last night.

I dropped in to the Drop Zone at 3:00AM (no moon=dark) and was at the far end from the rally point. Landed in weeds as tall as I am and took 10 min to gather my chute and gear. After dropping off my parachute gear I had a 40 pound ruck and 5 pound rifle that I leasurely walked with for about 4 Kms. Was a nice night for a walk. Once at the assembly area I was able to lay down in the dirt for about an hour while they took accountability.

Let the 5 day weekend start!!!

Frolicking Dino
2006-06-30, 23:41
The Frolicking Dinos have been hiking to waterfalls in middle TN USA:


about 6 miles into the Firestone Bridgestone Centennial Wilderness (http://www.firestone100.com/road/land_bottom_fr.html) to see three falls that were nearly completely dry :motz:
1.6 miles and (male dino only) several serious climbs to the bottoms of falls at Stone Fort State Park (http://state.tn.us/environment/parks/OldStoneFort/) near Manchester, TN (three very nice falls)
About 3/4 mile of serious scrambling up and down to get a glimpse of Cummins Falls (http://www.jtwphotography.com/Cummins%20Falls.htm)outside of Cookeville, TN
3 hours of rock hopping at Twin Falls (http://community.webshots.com/photo/281313112/1281327168066147450Johxad) in the Rock Island State Park - and the female dino was able to do it :elefant: s - l - o - w - l - y
Assorted other short hikes to falls near roads

KLeth
2006-08-06, 02:46
Got back from 17 days on Greenland yesterday.
We started out by going to Kangerlussuaq (http://www.greenland-guide.gl/kangerlussuaqtourism/default.htm)(Sønder Strømfjord/SFH/Kanger) by plane, direct from Copenhagen.
We hiked for 11 days in the outback around Kangerlussuaq. The area is very easily hiked, unspoiled and there is a lot of wildlife. Most mountains there are so worn down by ice that you can go to the top pretty easy.
After the 11 days we flew on to Ilulissat (http://greenland.com/Towns_and_Regions/North_Greenland/Ilulissat.php) to be tourists. We went boating, eate the local mamals and fish, took a helicopter ride to the Icefjord ect.
It was a very nice trip (actually our honeymoon) but now we are home, which is also very nice. :biggrin:

JAK
2006-08-06, 10:38
Got back from 17 days on Greenland yesterday.
We started out by going to Kangerlussuaq (http://www.greenland-guide.gl/kangerlussuaqtourism/default.htm)(Sønder Strømfjord/SFH/Kanger) by plane, direct from Copenhagen.
We hiked for 11 days in the outback around Kangerlussuaq. The area is very easily hiked, unspoiled and there is a lot of wildlife. Most mountains there are so worn down by ice that you can go to the top pretty easy.
After the 11 days we flew on to Ilulissat (http://greenland.com/Towns_and_Regions/North_Greenland/Ilulissat.php) to be tourists. We went boating, eate the local mamals and fish, took a helicopter ride to the Icefjord ect.
It was a very nice trip (actually our honeymoon) but now we are home, which is also very nice. :biggrin:You can't get off that easy.
Many of us only dream of going to Greenland. Please post a more comprehensive trip report in the Journal. All the details. OK leave out the honeymoon details. Congrats on that also.

I am curious what the locals think about global warming.

p.s. Pictures. Don't forget pictures.

jimtanker
2006-08-06, 11:23
Yea, that would make a great trip report. Lets hear it!

Iceman
2006-08-06, 20:15
Just arrived home from a highcounty bear hunt. Blasted a bear and she rolled deep into a canyon. Caped and Quartered and four hours later had her at the vehicle. Very exhausting. I need that thought, reminded me how out of shape I am. Hiked all of Saturday and some of this morning before heading home. Not sure how many miles...but very steep, rugged and hot. Maybe lost a pound or two... The bear hunt was not really on my list of to do's, but am satisfied none the less!

Now to clean the vehicle and gear, meat is on ice-- to cut later this week.

Whooh', I'm exhausted.

Frolicking Dino
2006-08-06, 21:49
Congrats on your successful bear hunt.

Looks like the rest of our hiking plans are on hold indefinitely. The male dino had a serious table saw accident while using a dado blade (http://woodchuck.fc2web.com/woodchuck/workshop/jigs/dado01-s.jpg). He cut 1/2 of the tip of his left index finger off, cut a large gash in his left ring finger (and two tendons they could repair, thank God), and cut his left bird finger lengthwise from the middle knuckle to the end all the way into the bone. Needless to say, he isn't going to be hiking with this nasty paw any time soon. The physical therapy is going be 3 times a week for a couple of months.

JAK
2006-08-07, 01:19
Just arrived home from a highcounty bear hunt. Blasted a bear and she rolled deep into a canyon. Caped and Quartered and four hours later had her at the vehicle. Very exhausting. I need that thought, reminded me how out of shape I am. Hiked all of Saturday and some of this morning before heading home. Not sure how many miles...but very steep, rugged and hot. Maybe lost a pound or two... The bear hunt was not really on my list of to do's, but am satisfied none the less!

Now to clean the vehicle and gear, meat is on ice-- to cut later this week.

Whooh', I'm exhausted.What do you mean your not in shape? If your weren't before that trip, you sure as heck gotta be now. Couple of days rest and some bear meat and you'll be ready to burn up some more miles. :)

There's a book I have of my father's that has some very interesting descriptions of traditional bear hunting and bear feast amongst the Montagnais of Labrador. When they had a bear feast, it was a 4 course meal, all bear. I think it started off seeing who could drink the most bear fat. From there it gets a little blurry. Apparently the women weren't supposed to eat the bear claw. Not sure why. I think it had to do with them being dangerous enough as they were. Congrats.

"Life and sport on the North shore of the lower St. Lawrence and Gulf, containing chapters on salmon fishing, trapping, the folk-lore of the Montagnais Indians and tales of adventure on the fringe of the Labrador Peninsula. 1909. by Napoleon A Comeau."

JAK
2006-08-07, 01:22
Congrats on your successful bear hunt.

Looks like the rest of our hiking plans are on hold indefinitely. The male dino had a serious table saw accident while using a dado blade (http://woodchuck.fc2web.com/woodchuck/workshop/jigs/dado01-s.jpg). He cut 1/2 of the tip of his left index finger off, cut a large gash in his left ring finger (and two tendons they could repair, thank God), and cut his left bird finger lengthwise from the middle knuckle to the end all the way into the bone. Needless to say, he isn't going to be hiking with this nasty paw any time soon. The physical therapy is going be 3 times a week for a couple of months.Youch. Bet you won't do that twice.
Well enjoy some day hikes and get well. Best hiking is in the Fall anyways eh.

KLeth
2006-08-07, 01:28
Yea, that would make a great trip report. Lets hear it! Well I'll try to do it sometimes in near future, first I have 1600 digital pictures to sort out, wife' 360 negatives to scan and 2 hours of raw video to edit.
Then I have to translate our trip log to English.
But I'll try.

Iceman: I hope bear tastes better than polarbear - Yuck! But on the other hand what we got could have been prepared in a bad way. Well that was what the locals told us and smoked polarbear was not too bad.


The male dino had a serious table saw accident . . Table saws make nasty wounds! Bot my father and my grandad have had accidents using tablesaws. Best of luck!

Take-a-knee
2006-08-07, 01:34
Congrats to Iceman on bagging the bear (was it a boar? Did you save the Oosick?) What caliber and load did you use? Condolences to Dino on the loss of his fingertip. I hope everything heals well. If more surgery is needed, we have a World class hand surgeon near here in Macon GA. Doctor Waldo Floyd JR, he is the son of a famous hand surgeon.

Iceman
2006-08-07, 10:22
Shot a sow. 254 yards (Laser rangefinder). 300RUM, 180 grain, Scirroco. I know a bit overkill, but I have been liking my long range capability of this new gun. First bear with this rifle.

jimtanker
2006-08-07, 10:28
Iceman - You're scarier than any bear Ive ever seen. Why do you got to pick on those little guys like that. I think you should go after them bare handed and give them a chance. Or at the very most just use a knife.

Damn, give them a chance.

Iceman
2006-08-07, 10:33
Hey, you know me....something had to die. :biggrin:

john pickett
2006-08-07, 14:58
"Doctor Waldo Floyd JR, he is the son of a famous hand surgeon"
Dr. Floyd Jr. is a fine surgeon, but if I needed hand surgery again, I would call on his son, Waldo Floyd III. When my wife and I lived in Macon ( 17 years ), Waldo III did carpal tunnel release on both of us; my right hand, my wifes' right and left hands. Be warned, if you go to Dr. Waldo III, don't have any plans for that day after the consult. He is perpetually overbooked.
My wife had a 3 pm office appt. She returned home at 8pm having waited some 6 hours.
john pickett

JAK
2006-08-07, 15:52
Hey, you know me....something had to die. :biggrin:On the Labrador Shore the Montagnais would drag them out of their lairs in winter by their hind legs. Of course the bears were a little drowsy at the time. They believed that if they killed them in their lairs the lair would not be reoccupied for several years.

I'm glad you don't use a bucket of donuts. Bears are generally quite shy here in New Brunswick, but I don't want them walking up to me asking for a 20 pack of timbits and an extra large double double. :)

SowthEfrikan
2006-08-07, 20:03
Dear Dinos, that's absolutely rotten luck. Speedy recovery - hiking is also good therapy.

Iceman
2006-08-29, 23:56
Took the family to St Helens this weekend. Camped along a river/mudflow washout on the south side of the mountain. Hot. 90 degree days. (Hot for out here...) Tent/Car camping. Explored the "touristy" evacuated lava tubes near the mountain. 44 degrees in the cave, 85plus above ground, what a difference. Small hike thru the bush to fish where other yahoo's weren't. Fun by all. Good to get out. To go again this weekend to Fire Country, our east side of our state. Grouse opener and Rattlesnake roundup.

Pic 1 is 'From our cave to yours..."

Pic 2 is of St Helens, from the south, ash deposits throughout the snow fields looks dirty...

Theres fun in them thar' hills...!

Frolicking Dino
2006-08-30, 22:14
We are going to try to get in some day hiking soon, but the backpacking trips won't be happening for a while. The male dino had a mini-stroke about 3 wks ago. While there is no permanent damage, we do need to find out why this happened to a guy in great health (he had his annual physical the day before the stroke) with no risks factors except age. They have scanned, dopplered and echogrammed everything and can't find anything wrong with the guy.

Kea
2006-08-30, 23:05
I am looking for some dayhiking partners to do some of the short and local stuff on my hit list above. I was also thinking of doing one on this coming Sunday, if anyone is interested.

dropkick
2006-08-31, 02:07
Took the family to St Helens this weekend.
Theres fun in them thar' hills...!

I've been to the mud pits and blow holes in Yellowstone twice, and I used to fish in the park quite often, so I can't really say anything about playing in the shadow of an active volcano, but it always makes me nervous when I think about it. (luckily I don't often think).

How is the damage healing?
My old neighbor (a science teacher) went there the summer after it blew, and brought back lots of pictures of devastation. After looking at his pics I had no wish to go there.
As that was 26 years ago I wondered how much of the damage is still visible.

I still have a bottle of dust from the blow that I gathered from our driveway.

Iceman
2006-08-31, 10:52
The huge devastation caused by the eruption is still evident, up close. Further out, the forests which were flattened are rejuvenating at a fast rate. For years, the Deer and Elk population in these areas grew exponentially. Now as the area closes in with growth and a canopy develops, we see reduced foods available and even this past winter had a large die off of elk as a result. Wildlife (anti hunting tree huggers) have even choppered out small groups of elk to dump in forests to the North for the local "native" indians to blast with modern rifles, areas not previously populated with elk. Oh geez, here I go.... (Why not open the area to disabled or youth hunters, seems to be a logical and cheap way to solve the overpopulation close in to the mountain but they would rather appease local indian tribes...) :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

Anyway, sorry for the diversion, the area is coming back greatly. Very beautiful and interesting to observe over the years. We are just a mere spec in comparison to mutha' nat'ur.

After our little excursion underground a 3.something earthquake was monitored around the mountain. And no it was not me stomping my boots off...

If any of you have a chance, plan a couple of days to tour the entire perimeter of this unique place. Truly amazing variation around the perimeter of St. Helens.

Iceman
2006-09-05, 01:50
Back from another outing... to Central Eastern Washington, despite the heat (93 degree highs...), no wind, low humidity and fires actively burning to our North and East both over ten miles away. A haze in the air. Orange night sky. Crackling brush underfoot. Dust rising behind you as you walk. Took the wife and kids up into the high country to car camp, trail hike, snake dodge, and grouse blast. 4500 feet to 5800 feet elevation.

PICS: Kids with Grouse... :elefant:

Is it OK to tie a rope around your kids, and dangle them over the bank to retrieve the grouse you just shot? :biggrin:

Seeker
2006-09-05, 14:36
Is it OK to tie a rope around your kids, and dangle them
over the bank to retrieve the grouse you just shot? :biggrin:

only if they don't make a sound.



spent a quick overnight in the kisatchie hills wilderness area on sunday/ monday... too hot, even for me... didn't get to sleep until after midnight, when it finally dropped below 80*. and it hasn't rained in ages, so all the streams are dried up... found a spring on the drive in that's always been reliable, topped off with 2 gallons, and did fine, but i'd have preferred the running streams (can rinse of then, before bed). carrying water's heavy!

little wildlife, probably due to lack of water. heard an owl kill something and fly off, some coyotes, and something overhead chewing on sticks and dropping pieces on my tarp all night, but only saw a turkey, and that was on the way in. usually, i hear at least one deer, possum, coon, armadillo, or hog go by at night. still, any night out is good, and does something to restore your soul, especially when you know there's not anyone around for miles...

may be taking my daughter and a friend's son out in a couple weeks, when it will hopefully have rained and cooled down some.

bird dog
2006-09-05, 21:52
Is it OK to tie a rope around your kids, and dangle them over the bank to retrieve the grouse you just shot? :biggrin:[/QUOTE]

I dont think the grouse mind.

bird dog
2006-09-05, 21:57
[QUOTE=Seeker]
usually, i hear at least one deer, possum, coon, armadillo, or hog go by at night. still,
QUOTE]


Had a friend chased and treed by a wild hog when I was in the 509th and in the box. BD

Kea
2006-10-21, 23:56
Ziler Loop Trail, Cacapon State Park outside Berkeley Springs, WV. Done to today.

:)

bird dog
2006-10-23, 09:02
Next weekend, 3 days in the Linville Gorge Wilderness Area. I am planning to hike the Foothills Trail next year along with Springer to ~Franklin, NC. No dates set yet. One will probably be in the early spring while the other will be in the fall. Anyone interested, let me know. BD