PDA

View Full Version : Nestle milk bottles



dropkick
2006-05-27, 07:16
Anyone ever used these for anything?
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-3/1165284/nestle_milk.jpg
Sorry, best picture I could find.

After you strip off the plastic label you have a clear bottle.
While the plastic of the bottles is a little thin, I really like the knurled cap.
With it you can get a good grip and it opens and closes easily.

I'm thinking of making a "holster" that would hook to my shoulder strap and carrying the bottle with some water in it there (ala Colin Fletcher* with his baby bottle).

-I don't use a water bag with a tube, I carry nalgenes instead, so this would be handier on the trail.



*author The Complete Walker, etc.

SGT Rock
2006-05-27, 07:36
Not that I am an expert, but I was told to never re-use a milk container for drinking.

Kea
2006-05-27, 10:15
Because of the porosity of plastic, you shouldn't reuse anything like that for potable water. Just enough of that milk seeps into the plastic and just doesn't come out again.

Remember that even when using Aquafina and similar liter bottles, that you should only use them for 2 week at most, and less than a week is preferable, even with meticulous cleaning and purification.

Take-a-knee
2006-05-27, 12:42
I reuse 20oz Gatorade bottles for water everyday, they get used once and go into the dishwasher and refilled with filtered water and stay in the fridge, I've been doing this for years with no problem. Gatorade isn't carbonated so the bottle isn't pressurized, therefore it has to be sturdier. I wouldn't hesitate to use one for hiking but I wouldn't put drink powder in it 'cause it has to many curves to clean by hand effectively

blackdog
2006-05-27, 18:46
A drinkable "fjell yoghurt" is sold here in HDPE (high density polyethylene) like the nesquik bottle. I wash them in the dishwasher and use them for bottled water, yoghurt, juice, etc. ...and have done so for years. Can't say how safe it is as i never keep the liquids in the bottles for more than a day (or rather from evening to afternoon).

I also use a washing compound that is developed here and not available in america yet as far as i know. It's better at attacking bacteria than normal dishwasher powders and also less corrosive. But it's almost twice as expensive too. It's not a case of luxury for me, but those small pills are nicer to nature and that's a subject close to my heart.

Things are really hard to compare. It's just too much of the apples and pears thing. One thing is certain, though. I wouldn't use the bottles without washing them thoroughly. That's in fact what made me choose HDPE instead of PET.

dropkick
2006-05-28, 00:49
I've been reusing plastic milk jugs for water for something over 30 years (as long as they've been available) and I've never had or even heard of a problem.
-Am I just lucky, or are you people worrying about something that has a very small chance of ever actually happening?

blackdog
2006-05-28, 05:34
I've been reusing plastic milk jugs for water for something over 30 years (as long as they've been available) and I've never had or even heard of a problem.
-Am I just lucky, or are you people worrying about something that has a very small chance of ever actually happening?
You are simply lucky. :)

Seriously... Water in a bottle is like water in a puddle or pond. After a while it turns green. In the old days there were a lot of sailors that got sick (or even died) from bad water on long cruises.

A friend was told to drink more water and thus got himself a bottle that he could drink from (a mineral water bottle made of PET). Every morning and lunch he rinsed it and filled it with fresh water and it was always on his desk next to his computer. After two weeks he started getting strange digestive problems but didn't change anything for another week. During this last weekend he visited my house and told me that he didn't feel well, even though he drank more water now. We talked about washing the bottle and he didn't think it was necessary. On monday he started using a new bottle (this time a HDPE one) and put it in the dishwasher at work every afternoon. On thursday his symptoms were gone. And the increased amount of water that he drinks now seems to do him good. He now keeps his water in a baby fridge under his desk too.

Frolicking Dino
2006-05-28, 10:07
I've had problems with milk staying in plastic. There is a store brand of flavored water that comes in a clear bottle with a knurled cap. I use those a lot.

Kea
2006-05-28, 22:11
One of the problems that Coke had when they wanted to recycle post consumer HDPE for their bottles was that originally they could not get the plastic clean enough to satisfy the government. Once the washing process was perfected, then you saw them selling their product in the bottles with the "25% post consumer" plastic bottles.

I actually don't have a problem with using HDPE bottles that contained water to begin with for short duration as a way to lighten the pack. Refilling with clean water is really the issue, because the plastic is more porous than Nalgene bottles. 3-4 days, with a purifier of some sort should be okay, but I'd replace those bottles as often as is convenient, and I would never reuse a bottle that had something other than water in it.

Water borne illness on the trail isn't my idea of fun.

:bawling: :bawling: :bawling:

KLeth
2006-05-29, 03:58
Milk is a problem in it self, since the fat from the milk coats the plastic and can be kind of hard to rinse away. HPE/HDPE is very dense but it scratches easily whitch makes it even harder to rinse.
We use AL or Nalgene bottels for water but xPE for nescafe, sugar, powdered milk ect. My old canteen was soft plastic and our water-bag is mostly a plastic bag . .
I think the key is not to fill with anything but pure (purified) water and not clean with anything but NaOH, KaOH or chlorine.

I read in my "Ray Mears" essential survival book, that sun will break down the taste of chemical purifiers, which can be utilized when using clear xPE bottles. Unfortunately the removal of the chemical taste also means that the chemical is broken down, so never expose drinking water to sun before the purification is complete.

Jim Henderson
2006-05-30, 12:59
Heck most GI Canteens are plastic and lord knows what they put in them besides water. I would guess that a properly cleaned container is pretty safe. You will not get all the bacteria out but you will kill enough that there aren't enough left to be a problem.

Babies run around with plastic containers all the time that have had milk in them. So I would guess reusing the plastic containers is safe.

However, you must wash and thouroughly dry any container you use. I learned the hard way. In hiking and camping over almost 40 years, I never had a problem with water contamination until one time a few years back. I was using metal USGI canteens for my regular walks. I usually just rinsed them out real well and occasionally cleaned them with hot water and soap and let them hang to dry.

Well guess one time I didn't let them dry out well enough before capping or I didn't clean them well enough. On that occasion I was about half way thru my 5 mile stroll when I noticed a bit of stomach discomfort. By the time I got home from my walk I was in the early stages of Montezumas revenge. I am sure it was contamination of my water since I do this walk first thing in the morning before any food etc. I was sick as a dog for about a week and lost 20 pounds from my svelte frame in that time. It is really strange how your skin gets all leather and doesn't snap back when pulled, after you are severely dehydrated.

Now I wash my canteens and pour boiling water in them and then I dry them in my convection oven at near boiling temps. If I can't do that I spritz them with Isopropyl Alcohol(rubbing alcohol will do) and swish it around and let them sit capped with the alcohol until I reuse them, rinsed first of course.

I would not feel wrong about reusing a plastic container, even one holding milk, but I would clean it thoroughly and maybe even soak them in a dilute solution of chlorine bleach or straight Isopropyl Alcohol.

Just my opinion, Wish the weight had stayed off.

Jim Henderson

Kea
2006-05-30, 21:18
Heck most GI Canteens are plastic and lord knows what they put in them besides water. I would guess that a properly cleaned container is pretty safe. You will not get all the bacteria out but you will kill enough that there aren't enough left to be a problem.

Babies run around with plastic containers all the time that have had milk in them. So I would guess reusing the plastic containers is safe.

However, you must wash and thouroughly dry any container you use.

Point the first: The standard issue GI canteen isn't made of a low density plastic and is therefore much less likely to pick up the kind of contamination that HDPE or PET is going to soak up. Disposable plastics are not the same quality.

Point the second: What you go through to get a baby bottle clean and sterilized so that it is safe for a kid to reuse is the stuff of legend. I breastfed all my kids, and it was neat, clean and easy until we started giving them fruit juices, milk, soy milk, and other bacteria growth mediums. Diarrhea is so common in small children because bottles are usually so hard to clean. :(

Point the third: Wash, thoroughly sanitize, and dry. Repeat as needed. In the field, if you are using some sort of purifying agent, I'm going to worry less about a reused Nestle Quik bottle than I would without. But...Aquafina bottles are on average safer, just because there is no chance of the kind of contamination we're worried about here.

Can someone tell me what plastic is used in GI canteens, so that I know?

Frolicking Dino
2006-05-30, 22:11
I have a feeling baby's reusable bottles are made of a much higher grade of plastic than soda bottles. They stand up to being repeatedly boiled. As Kea notes, they are hard to clean and have to be sterilized between uses. (I breastfed as well - much easier and healthier for the child).

Kea, I was unable to find what material is used to make GI canteens.

I reuse bottles that have contained water or diet soda only. I've had problems with others (tummy troubles).

Iceman
2006-05-31, 00:18
.... I was sick as a dog for about a week and lost 20 pounds from my svelte frame in that time. Jim Henderson

Hallelujah! I can't wait to drop 20lbs! :elefant: Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy!

Thank you for my new diet! I am going to shoot for 40lbs. :biggrin:

KLeth
2006-05-31, 04:40
Hallelujah! I can't wait to drop 20lbs! :elefant: Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy! Thank you for my new diet! I am going to shoot for 40lbs. :biggrin: Why do I get associations to Homer Simpson ?
:biggrin: :angel:

SGT Rock
2006-05-31, 09:38
Hey, all that said. There are some water products that come in the gallon milk-jug style jugs. Those a great for hauling water because they don't weigh much and have a handel for tying onto a pack. Another thing they are good for is cutting the bottom off to make an ultralight bowl/sink/dish/etc.

atraildreamer
2006-06-04, 03:48
I use the liter size soda bottles. When they start to get scuzzy :evil: ,rinse them out, put a few drops of bleach in them, fill them up and let stand overnight. Rinse with hot water and refill. They'll be as good as new! :)

Chiefs50
2006-08-17, 08:50
Can someone tell me what plastic is used in GI canteens, so that I know?

The bottom of mine is stamped HTP.


mike

JPW
2006-08-18, 13:40
Iceman...Just make X-Lax chip cookies and eat all you want.

KLeth
2006-08-19, 02:31
On this summer trip we used two 1ŻL cider HPE bottles.
No matter how well we rinsed them, at times we were still able to taste the original cider-flavour even over the MIOX chlorine-taste. But we had no problems with any form of growth inside the bottles.
Best thing was that we could trash the bottles end of hike and thereby save some weight for the next part of the trip.

A very good thing about transparent bottles are that you are able to see impurities and how many creatures you captured in the bottle.
Serveral times we emptied a bottle due to too much sand, creatures or seaweed in the water. But that was only when we didn't pump/filter the water.

Iceman
2006-08-19, 09:15
Iceman...Just make X-Lax chip cookies and eat all you want.

Hey thanks, but I already tried that. Had to tape my vent shut with a bandaid to keep my intestines from falling out! :biggrin: