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dropkick
2006-06-17, 07:39
Was making some hamburger jerky and started thinking about trying other meats. Not worried (healthwise) about any of the other meats except pork.

I grew up in a time when trichinosis was a big worry, and you never served pork medium or rare. it was always well done (internal temp. 170F). It is my understanding that this is no longer a requirement, but I still worry.

I was thinking about using some of the pork I grind for sausage, as it will be extremely lean. I could grind it, then freeze it for a few days before drying, to make sure it doesn't have worms. Maybe flash heat it then dry it.
I want to use it in other recipes like I do dried burger.
- Maybe season it and have dried breakfast sausage.

Am I missing sonething? Is there a reason not to do this beyond the trichinosis?

Frolicking Dino
2006-06-17, 09:37
Apparently the USDA recommends you raise the temp of ground beef, chicken, turkey and pork to 160F (71.1C) before drying. Source: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/jerky_and_food_safety/index.asp

dropkick
2006-06-18, 02:04
Apparently the USDA recommends you raise the temp of ground beef, chicken, turkey and pork to 160F (71.1C) before drying. Source: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/jerky_and_food_safety/index.asp
Thanks, I already do this.
I was schooled as a cook and made my living as one for many years, and food safety always stuck with me.
I do most of my drying in a 200 F oven.
I also leave the door closed for the first hour.

Kea
2006-06-18, 15:28
Am I missing sonething? Is there a reason not to do this beyond the trichinosis?

If you are A) using a strong cure, B) drying thoroughly, C) proof the meat at at least 160F, and D) package it so that it doesn't become contaminated, you should avoid all dangers of food borne illness. This includes trichinosis.

The big deal with trich, and most other pathogens is from food that is improperly cooked and/or left so that nasty stuff can grow in it.

I store precooked, dried hamburger for food storage and right before I vacuum seal it for storage, I raise it to 200 degrees in my oven, and then shove it into the bags and seal it. The trick is really cleanliness and sufficient heat to do the job, and cleanliness. Oh, and cleanliness. :)

atraildreamer
2006-06-24, 04:59
Apparently the USDA recommends you raise the temp of ground beef, chicken, turkey and pork to 160F (71.1C) before drying. Source: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/jerky_and_food_safety/index.asp


The Nesco website www.nesco.com recommends 160 degrees for 1 hour after dehydrating...which way is correct, or does it matter as long as it is done? :confused:

Mutinousdoug
2006-06-24, 17:07
Admittedly, the 160f recommendation addresses the bug issue but I find that cooked meat tastes way different than dried or smoked meat (i.e. jerky).
Factory raised pork carries almost no threat of trich and is routinely tested for same which is why you can eat it medium rare in this country. I think the same article mentioned that industrialized countrys that have largely eliminated intestinal parisites suffer 3-4 times the amount of Crohns desease (an inflamation of the bowels) as countries whos inhabitants commonly suffer from intestinal worms. I guess you cooks your meat and takes your chances.

TerribleTom
2006-07-05, 20:28
It looks like you could freeze first to kill any potential trich worms then (safely) dry without excessive heat for better flavor.

According to the USDA article, from 1997-2001 the US averaged 12 trich cases/year. That number is probably smaller than the average number of PowerBall winners over the same period, and way less than the number of lightning strike victims.

I have two brothers that are chefs and both routinely serve rare/med. rare pork to paying customers on a daily basis. If the restaurant industry will serve you rare pork, you can bet it's safe--those folks are as liability-shy as any I've come across (how many places won't sell a rare burger?)

KLeth
2006-07-06, 01:52
Don't know if it is a problem in the US but here in Europe we have problems with salmonella and frequently we get reports on pork being recalled due to salmonella infestation.
Salmonella is killed at temperatures around 75C, but in most cases it is only on the outside of the meat, that is if the meat is from a dense muscle. This meain that if the outside of the meat is treated to 75C the meat should be fairly safe regarding salmonella.

I wouldn't eat raw or semi raw pork for many causes (I do not like the taste either), but if I were to make pork-jerky from raw pork, I would scold the uncut meat in boiling water for e.g. 4 min (depending on the size of the chunk) to kill any surface bacteria growth before cutting the meat into strips on a clean cutting board.

- Just my 5C :angel:

Thin air
2006-07-11, 19:49
>>>>>>Is trichinellosis common in the United States?

Infection was once very common and usually caused by ingestion of undercooked pork. However, infection is now relatively rare. During 1997-2001, an average of 12 cases per year were reported. The number of cases has decreased because of legislation prohibiting the feeding of raw-meat garbage to hogs, commercial and home freezing of pork, and the public awareness of the danger of eating raw or undercooked pork products. Cases are less commonly associated with pork products and more often associated with eating raw or undercooked wild game meats.>>>>>>

Better you should take some homemade pork jerky than to kill an animal in the wild eat it.

Mutinousdoug
2006-07-11, 23:11
Salmonella is a MUCH bigger threat to health in the USA than Trich or any other desease carried by the host animal. You don't have a good chain of possession with factory meat (of course you have none with game) as far as hygene-thus exposure to: Salmonella (and ultimately: "mad cow"). With self-hunted meat, you are your only FDA and sanitation is up to you. Animals that eat carrion (this includes squirrels/chipmunks) should be prepared "well-done" to minimze pathogen exposure. Ruminants such as Deer, elk, etc., not so much, provided they haven't been fed bloodmeal ration like British (and American?) beef and lamb.