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dropkick
2006-06-24, 01:48
Over boyscouted
Being over prepared
i.e. Bringing a winter jacket (in case it gets cold) on a July hike. Bringing enough medical supplies for 10 people. Carrying enough extra food for 5 days.

peter_pan
2006-06-24, 10:00
Over boyscouted
Being over prepared
i.e. Bringing a winter jacket (in case it gets cold) on a July hike. Bringing enough medical supplies for 10 people. Carrying enough extra food for 5 days.

No wonder your mule is hoisted off its feet by your "cart".... On the other hand you'll probably saved a few "unprepareds" over the years.

Pan

ripvanarkie
2006-06-26, 11:15
I had not hiked in years... when I left my job that was the fist thing I did, wilderness hiking! I gathered a few like-minded friends and we went for a three night trip into some of the roughest terrain Arkansas has to offer. Our pack weights ranged form 40-60 lbs! 18 months later I now have my 4-day pack weight down to 28 lbs for winter camping! In that time I tried several frame packs. One day I was hiking with my brother-in-law who is a guardsman, he loaned my his LBV for a day hike, I loved it! Since then I have bought a German Tactical Vest and taken it on two 3-day trips and one 4-day trip, it was more comfortable than anything I've ever hiked with! More than half of the compartments are watertight. To go from 45lbs to 28 is awesome!

Later,
Rip

Jim Henderson
2006-06-26, 13:01
Over boyscouted, heck, we always used to do that back when me and my buddy were young and lively enough that a 60-80 pound pack was a sign of manliness.

We each used to take two stoves, a heavy 8R and a lighter GT and enough fuel and fuel cannisters to boil all our water for a 3 day weekend and then some, a lantern or two, plus their cannisters. Also took enough cook gear to cook for a family and of course my steel campers grill.

Always had food for maybe 50% more than we needed, at least it was real backpacking lightweight freeze dried food. Plus we had a can or two of fruit, chili(for our traditional chili and rice nite cap), and of course our first dinner of a large frozen steak wrapped in the sleeping bag.

What fun.

Now being older and less inclined to try to carry 30% of my body weight which mysteriously has crept up. I try to go lighter and am now eyeballing my two boys to see how much I can pawn off onto their backs.

I still have all my old gear and still use it. I haven't tried carrying my portable hibachi on a hike lately tho.

Jim Henderson

KLeth
2006-06-27, 02:07
Our first hike, we carried way too much food, spare burner for stove, candles, torch ect. We didn't have food rations for many more day, but we had too much food in each ration. I carried around 47kg and my better half around 35.
The following year we had food for the same number of days but we carried "only" 37kg and 30kg. We still had to stoves ect. but we had scaled down no the necessities and brought lighter food.
This year we aim for a total of 56kg . . . .

j.johnson
2006-06-27, 16:53
I try to go lighter and am now eyeballing my two boys to see how much I can pawn off onto their backs.

Jim Henderson[/QUOTE]

The pawning off of stuff to the kids works well, I was the target years ago. My parents and a few of my siblings went snowshoeing in the mountains of Utah, I was dying for a cold soda on the hike and when we got to the cabin my mom asked where I put my pack so she could ge a soda out for my dad, I had 2-6 packs of fresca soda's. Lets just say I always packed by back pack from then on. :damnmate:

deadeye
2006-06-27, 17:22
Aside from a 'planned' extra day's light rations, the only redundant item I regularly carry is one of the plastic spoons from an MRE. It's a rare trip that I can't manage to give one away to someone who forgot their spoon! :rolleyes:

Iceman
2006-06-28, 00:22
KLeth, sounds like "Muleing" may be a great idea for you to add to the Lexicon?