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dropkick
2006-07-28, 01:43
There are fires all over the place. From my front yard I can see 3. Yesterday it was 4. They are all under 1000 acres, but I don't like seeing them at all.

They were all man caused. I hope they catch the people and nail them.

Lately quite a few fires have been intentionally started by fire fighters or support crew, in order to drum up work. These people should be castrated and then dumped naked in the woods.

The fire that they caught and put out yesterday was in my favorite recreation area. It was in an area that I visit almost daily. It only burned 3 acres, but that was due to already having crews and bombers in the area and it being spotted quickly. I haven't gone up to see what was destroyed yet.I'm hoping it won't be to bad.

Lately I have been going up the West Fork of the Bitterroot River and trying new trails and areas in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. I have been really enjoying myself, but I'm fearful about going into some of the areas now, as it would be too easy to get trapped by a fire.

This really stinks.

JAK
2006-07-28, 02:16
That sucks. Not having work sucks but there has to be a better way. I heard of a place in Northern BC that solved that problem by letting them burn the same hill every year, and from the top down. Not sure how true that was. Interesting, but there still has to be a better way. Anyhow, that was a bunch of years ago and they had a really bad fire this year. Up around Chetwynd BC. The woods seem to be wet out here in New Brunswick, at least along the coast. Quebec has had some bad fires in the last while though.

Turk
2006-07-28, 18:33
Wild fires are cancelling all major trips into Wabakimi park this year up my way.
They haven't done any controlled burns in several years due to manpower and budget cutbacks. Instead they are justifying these massive fires as ecologically sound and an important part of the natural cycle. Local forums have some crazy pictures of skylines completely lit up at night by some mammoth 15-20,000 acre fires. If we see fires that large this year go unchecked, there is going to be some very depressing scenery along Wabakimi's major paddling trips. I personally wouldn't want to be that close. But I guess if you are experienced in their behaviour and suppression techniques, it would be much safer.

dropkick
2006-07-29, 01:28
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-3/1165284/montanafire.jpg
Picture taken by firefighter on Bitterroot River, yr. 2000.
I lost a lot of property and 40 acres worth of trees to this fire, not far from where this picture was taken.

They say this year could be worse.

JAK
2006-07-29, 02:36
That's a beautiful picture and a horrible sight at the same time.

Do you think there is any way to make the woods less dry? Like more selective cutting and mulching the stuff that gets left behind? To me it makes sense to leave more of a canopy. The woods are naturally less dry here though because of the Bay of Fundy. Quebec gets plenty of snow and rain but they still get some bad fires.

GregH
2006-07-29, 12:55
I'm leaving for the Quetico next week and they have a burn ban in effect. It will be our first trip in 14 years with no campfires -- stoves only. I'm dreading the fuel load for 9 men x 10 days.
We need that Jet Stream to reach down south and give North America some relief! :bawling:

Take-a-knee
2006-07-29, 13:29
Dropkick, I maybe completely off-base, but I was under the impression that the clinton administration had a "no hand-of-man" policy on the western national forests, for the most part. This allowed fuel to accumulate on the forest floor, setting the stage for events like you captured in that stunning photo. Decades ago when I worked as a carpenter we would occasionally use Douglas Fir for framing and lots of it for exterior trim. Even as late as 12-15 yr ago fir was still used in the the northeast for framing. Thousands of years ago Solomon spoke of "rafters of fir and posts of cedar". The price of western cedar and white (lodgepole?) pine has tripled or more in a decade. These are some very valuable trees that are being allowed to burn up in the name of serving Gia or some other mystical crap. What national forests we have in the south are tied up in unending lawsuits by the tree huggers to prevent any and all harvest of timber. I fear for our future forests in the south as a result of these policies.

Here in the southeast, fire is used to manage the pine forests in the coastal plain. With periodic burning, like that done by nature and indigenous americans, these are lovely places to be. They also will support 3-4times as much wildlife per acre for many years after a burn. Without fire, they turn into an impenetrable maze.

I've read that the elk populations explode in the out west after a large fire, apparantly forb and grass seeds in the ground for decades sprout and grow and feed God's creatures. What do you think?

dropkick
2006-07-29, 19:21
Dropkick, I maybe completely off-base, but I was under the impression that the clinton administration had a "no hand-of-man" policy on the western national forests, for the most part. This allowed fuel to accumulate on the forest floor, setting the stage for events like you captured in that stunning photo. Decades ago when I worked as a carpenter we would occasionally use Douglas Fir for framing and lots of it for exterior trim. Even as late as 12-15 yr ago fir was still used in the the northeast for framing. Thousands of years ago Solomon spoke of "rafters of fir and posts of cedar". The price of western cedar and white (lodgepole?) pine has tripled or more in a decade. These are some very valuable trees that are being allowed to burn up in the name of serving Gia or some other mystical crap. What national forests we have in the south are tied up in unending lawsuits by the tree huggers to prevent any and all harvest of timber. I fear for out future in the south as a result of these policies. The hands off policies are for The wilderness areas (most are contained within national forests). Clinton enlarged these areas and tried to extend more hands off rules into other parts of the forest.

In a wilderness area you aren't allowed to fight a fire, much less do anything to prevent it. This has lead to overcrowded, dead wood filled, diseased forests. Environmental pretenders who don't know much about the environment but pretend too, have lead us here.

They believe that the forests should be left alone to return to a "pristine" condition. Totally ignoring the impact people have had on the forests and the continuing changes we bring, whether we wish to or not.

Their views are normally sophmoric to say the least. And their continual obstruction of those who are trying use reality in management of the forests is damaging to the forests and everything that lives in and around them.