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SCmoose
2006-09-18, 22:40
Im leaving in less than 2 weeks for a 7 days backpacking trip. How much fuel can I expect to use? Ive got a cat can stove, windscreen, blackened pot, ect. Im having hot cereal for b-fast and Lipton rice/pasta dishs for dinner. I have been trying differant meals and measureing fuel use, I think I will use about 20oz of alcohol; including clean up water, and will probally carry 24oz. Think thats about right?

Ive been thinking about presoaking meals before heating them but dont know if that will save much fuel. Any other tips that might reduce fuel useage?

Skidsteer
2006-09-18, 23:24
Im leaving in less than 2 weeks for a 7 days backpacking trip. How much fuel can I expect to use? Ive got a cat can stove, windscreen, blackened pot, ect. Im having hot cereal for b-fast and Lipton rice/pasta dishs for dinner. I have been trying differant meals and measureing fuel use, I think I will use about 20oz of alcohol; including clean up water, and will probally carry 24oz. Think thats about right?

Ive been thinking about presoaking meals before heating them but dont know if that will save much fuel. Any other tips that might reduce fuel useage?

Well it sounds a bit high.

I assume you boil and simmer your meals in your pot? One tip that will save you some fuel is to freezer bag cook (http://www.freezerbagcooking.com/).

If you don't like the idea of eating from a bag, you can use something like Sgt. Rock's lemonade jar to accomplish the same thing. The idea is to use enough fuel to boil water, pour the boiling water on your food and let it do the cooking for you. Way less fuel consumed, plus you don't have to heat as much water for clean-up. None, in fact, if you go with the freezer bags.

How much water do you normally cook with and how much fuel does it take for your stove to bring it to a boil?

dropkick
2006-09-19, 00:46
Build yourself a cozy, and go with one pot meals.
With it you only have to expend enough fuel to get water boiling.

You might also think about some form of insulating pad for under your stove, it helps when the temperature is cooler for both lighting and getting the stove up to operating temp quicker. (even doubled up aluminum foil works)

Pre-soaking noodles makes them cook faster. (With cozy cooking this only means you get to eat sooner, no fuel gain).

dropkick
2006-09-19, 00:59
Oh, and here are a few helpful threads

http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1819&highlight=cozy

http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1708&highlight=cozy

http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1550&highlight=cozy

SCmoose
2006-09-19, 08:15
The most water I use is 2cups. I put 1 oz fuel in stove, light and mix my food in the water. I stir to keep from sticking and when the flame goes out it steeps if any water left. Ive found it takes a couple minutes to boil and will contiue to boil for about 4 minutes. Ive used my homemade stove many times on weekend trips but never for a week. If I poured water over a Lipton dish in a cozy(either freezer bag or jag) how long does it take to sit before its ready? 15minutes?

Skidsteer
2006-09-19, 09:01
The most water I use is 2cups. I put 1 oz fuel in stove, light and mix my food in the water. I stir to keep from sticking and when the flame goes out it steeps if any water left. Ive found it takes a couple minutes to boil and will contiue to boil for about 4 minutes. Ive used my homemade stove many times on weekend trips but never for a week. If I poured water over a Lipton dish in a cozy(either freezer bag or jag) how long does it take to sit before its ready? 15minutes?

Fifteen minutes should be fine in a good insulated cozy. The nice thing about cozy cooking is really the flexibility factor. Many times I will cook soon after stopping for the night, throw the freezer bag in a cozy, then go about setting up camp, getting water, etc. In all but the coldest temps, the food stays plenty warm up to an hour or more.

Generally, you can cook a Lipton with this method using 12-14 oz. of water instead of a full 2 cups. Depending on your stove, this means you might be able to get by with 1/2 to 2/3 oz. of fuel for your boil. Test it a few times in windy conditions and you can get a good feel for how much fuel your stove will require in worst-case and best-case scenarios.

I use more fuel making coffee than I do cooking dinner. :biggrin: