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View Full Version : Pretty nice (partial?) gasifier stove



TeeDee
2006-09-28, 21:31
On one of the yahoo groups, somebody pointed out this woodburning stove:

http://news.bahai.org/story/360

Pretty nice stove. Make a good stove for a base camp.

Somebody here:

http://www.instructables.com/id/EFYJNQ9JEZES9J4SSJ/

has tried a homemade version using paint cans.

dropkick
2006-09-29, 20:15
Unfortunately the homemade version has a flaw, it needs a 3rd wall and it also needs the holes repositioned.
Without doing this, the air is going to enter from the top (around your cook pot - cooling it) travel through the fire and exit out through the holes in the walls.
It would either choke the fire and/or create a very ineffecient stove.

On the other hand, with just a few slight modifications this could be a neat and inexpensive little camp stove.
-Might be little heavy for backpack (except for Iceman).

Rosaleen
2006-09-29, 21:44
That first stove is even more intersting when I look at where it is being touted... to save fuel in developing African countries. While this is an admirable idea, people there can save even more fuel by using solar energy to pasteurize water and cook food. It has been a while since I've seen the articles, but one showed how to use 2 L plastic soda bottles and the sun to make water potable. It takes like 4 hours or more, so this isn't for lightweight packers on the trail. Here is how, as best I recall:
Fill a 2 L clear soda bottle about 2/3 full of fairly clear water, seal and shake vigorously. Add water to fill the bottle. Lay the bottle on its side in full sun for several (4, IIRC,) hours. The UV and heat will work with the incorporated air/oxygen and kill most pathogens. Pretty simple and great for someone in a stationary position.

There was a web site a few years ago that showed several simple home made solar ovens and one being made for third world countries. In sunny climes, a dish could be prepared early in the day and set into one of the cookers, much as we use our crock pots/slow cookers. In hot, dry countries where women had to walk for hours to acquire safe water and wood for cooking, turning to their abundant solar energy seems like one of those head-slapping ideas. "Why didn't we do this sooner?"

Rosaleen