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dropkick
2006-11-04, 23:29
Made some cheddar broccoli potato soup for dinner and it was goood.
But as is normal I made too much.
Instead of freezing it for later like I usually do, I thought I might try running it through a blender and then dehydrating it.
I've dried stew before but never soup.
Any tips?

john pickett
2006-11-06, 15:07
Dropkick,
First a question. Why run it through the blender? Seems to me a little variation in texture would improve palatability. Just my opinion.
I have used an electric oven to dehydrate liquids. I put a sheet of foil in a pan with a low lip, with the foil up over the lip all around. Sprayed the foil with a cooking oil spray, then poured the liquid in the tray, placed the tray in the oven and left the oven on low with the door propped open with a pencil.
Checked the tray every few hours and rotated as necesary to keep from burning the food.

To those who feel I'm needlessly burning bandwidth with these instructions, please remember poor Dropkick lives in Montana and Needs this kind of detail.:aetsch:
John Pickett

deadeye
2006-11-06, 16:15
I'm thinking (no... really!) that the approach I would take would be to strain out the big chunks of veggies and potatoes, etc. to dry on a tray separately from the broth. Seems like a broth-based soup would be easier to dry than a creamy soup like cheddar, but in either case, I'll bet that separating the liquids from the solids would give better results.

dropkick
2006-11-08, 04:54
John Pickett. as your from Texas I'll type slow and try not to use any big words. :aetsch:

I thought blending it would make for more even drying, plus mashing the potatoes would thicken it making it easier to deal with.

dropkick
2006-11-08, 04:59
I'd give you an update on how my dehydrating went, but.....
My parents came over and ate with me.....
No more leftover soup.

john pickett
2006-11-08, 17:13
Oh, the best laid plans of mice and men....:aetsch:
John Pickett

n2o2diver
2006-11-08, 20:22
Seems to me that if you tried to dehydrate soup your going to end up with some kind of sludgy paste. I don't think your going to turn it into a powder that you can just rehydrate. Would be intresting to find out.

Rosaleen
2006-11-08, 21:36
Dropkick-

I'm thinking that eating up the soup with your parents was probably a good thing. I dehydrate lots of stuff, but for cheddar broccoli soup, I'd use something like BearCreek Cheddar Broccoli and just add some more dehydrated goodies. Suggestions: additional broccoli, dry milk, tuna or chicken, ham, or even ground beef or groud turkey; other veggies, such as a little carrot, peas, celery, parsley, maybe corn. If you "beef" the stuff up a bit, you will have a rib-sticking and nutritious meal. Something like this can really hit the spot on a cold, rainy day. Use the potato soup without the cheddar as above, or with salmon. Yum!

Rosaleen (AKA, Mom)

sailingsoul
2006-11-08, 22:12
n2o2' said "'Seems to me that if you tried to dehydrate soup your going to end up with some kind of sludgy paste. I don't think your going to turn it into a powder that you can just rehydrate. Would be interesting to find out." Well that's what I first thought and I also wondered if this would take days in the oven, with so much fluid. What would be the cost of energy for the oven during that time? Wouldn't buying dried soup mixes be best? :argh: or , I did a quick Google search on "Dried soup mixes" and found many sites that give recipes on making you own dried soup mixes from dry ingredients. also "Make your own instant soup mix with non-fat dry milk, chicken boullion granules, seasonings and thickening agents" (corn starch), ending with "package , store in cool dry place up to 6 months". Some of these used rice or pasta. These would not be desirable due to long cooking time. But could one use minute rice or rice noodles???? At the risk of using a dirty word it sounded "Ultralight" to me. Anyone who doesn't like the term could add steel bb's, to up the weight. That way after dinner if you fart just right, you might shoot your next meal! :ahhhhh: !!!!No need to carry gun powder , casings or a gun!!! SS :captain:

dropkick
2006-11-09, 00:24
I wanted to dehydrate the soup as it tasted very good and as I had made it from scratch it wasn't high in salt or any other ingredients I might not want.
- Plus I just wanted to see how it would work out.


... "Make your own instant soup mix with non-fat dry milk, chicken boullion granules, seasonings and thickening agents" (corn starch), ending with "package , store in cool dry place up to 6 months". Some of these used rice or pasta. These would not be desirable due to long cooking time. But could one use minute rice or rice noodles????

I'm into cozy cooking now (add boiling water to ingredients, put in homemade thermos -cozy- and wait till done)
Anyway, because of this I'm not real fond of cornstarch as it has a habit of clumping and not thickening well with this method of cooking (though I do use it in a (very) few recipes). I would rather thicken with flour or much better with potato flakes.

I replace rice with minute rice in almost all recipes.

Noodles can be replaced with Ramen noodles, quick cooking chinese noodles, precooked and dried noodles, homemade, cous cous, etc.

If you only have regular noodles you can presoak, which cuts down the cooking time by quite a bit.

sailingsoul
2006-11-09, 00:25
Dropkick: I found this recipe @ ellenskitchen.com . I mention the site to give credit of source ..There are others . I deny any connection . This is the line I'm thinking . Add broccoli , Cheddar powder Wa-la'

Instant Potato Soup Powder
12 servings
1/2 cup (about 2 ounces) chicken bouillon granules
3 cups instant mashed potato flakes, packed
2 tablespoons instant minced onions
3 tablespoons dried green onions
1 teaspoon white pepper
1/4 cup bacon bits, real or soy; crumbled well (optional)
1 tablespoon parsley flakes
1/2 tablespoon dill weed
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1 cup instant milk powder
1 teaspoon turmeric (optional )
yummmmy :top:
The site goes on to say when storing dry soup mix: shelf life is reduced when dried veggies are powdered. (More surface area exposed to the air.) And that vacuum sealing could/should increase shelf life. Mixing it up before the trip would insure freshness. SS :captain:

PKH
2006-11-09, 06:55
Certainly it is possible to dehydrate soups - I've done this many times. Generally speaking, thicker or "creamier" soups are easiest. Brothy soups are messy and difficult in the dehydrator. Running the type of soup as you suggested through a blender is a sensible idea, but a couple of quick pulses should do the trick. That way you'll still get some texture. The finer the blend, the quicker the drying and reconstitution. I use a simple boil water and pot cozy technique for all my backpacking meals, and I have found that my thick soups rehydrate nicely in five to ten minutes tops.

The quick blender pulse technique also works well for spaghetti sauces, chilli, stews, etc.

If your soup looks as if it will be a bit too thin or brothy for drying, try adding a handful of dried rice, lentils or split peas. This will thicken it up nicely. Here's a idea I've used a lot lately: throw a cup or two of lentils into leftover pot roast stock (fat skimmed off of course), simmer for a bit and then dry. You get all the benefits of lentils (protein and carbs) with all the great flavour of the pot roast juices. Rehydrate as thick or thin as you like.

Some commercial soups work very well too. Campbells Gardennay brand is a good example. These are all rather thick vegetable soups - a variety of flavours - and these dry and rehydrate quickly. A tad expensive though.

For backpacking purposes I find it takes about three cups of thick soup to satisfy me, unless I've got some nice bread to supplement the meal.

Cheers,

PKH