PDA

View Full Version : What do you use for a place to cook?



tdaward
2006-12-04, 23:17
Had a delima this weekend....I need something to put down on the ground to set the stove, and the rest of my cooking stuff on. I'm tired of the dirt and leaves on every thing..What do you use? I was thinking of some cotton fabric or something.....

Just Jeff
2006-12-05, 00:33
CCF sit pad or a small square of aluminum foil. Or both. Depending on the kind of stove, the foil reflects the heat back up and the pad insulates the fuel/stove from the cold ground.

KLeth
2006-12-05, 01:31
How about a square of mylar sheet ?
Or a square of polyester or PVC coated tablecloth ?

BuKu
2006-12-05, 02:49
I carry a 2'x4' piece of tyvek for a ground cloth. At night the dog sleeps on it.
Incidentally, this is my first post. I recently geared up - HH, Big Agnes, Gregory, etc. Things have changed a lot from my old Kelty Ski Tourer (one of the first internal frame packs) Optimus 111b stove, Reichle boots. My back and feet appreciate the advancements.
I'm looking forward to both contributing and gleaning information.

deadeye
2006-12-05, 09:18
Unless cold is a real factor, I just find a flat rock, and save the CCF for my butt. In winter, I'll build a platform of twigs & bark on top of packed snow to insulate the stove from the snow.

Just Jeff
2006-12-05, 09:48
Welcome to the site, BuKu!

Good idea using the twigs, deadeye. I usually just use the ground unless it's cold, too - I usually have the JetBoil so nothing gets real dirty when it's just the cannister touching the ground. For the alcohol stove, that's one reason I made the Nesquik stove...keeps the actual stove/fuel off the ground, reflects the heat back up to the pot, etc. Plus it's so much more stable than the 2 oz setup I was using that the extra weight is worth it to me.

bird dog
2006-12-05, 13:38
CCF sit pad or a small square of aluminum foil. Or both. Depending on the kind of stove, the foil reflects the heat back up and the pad insulates the fuel/stove from the cold ground.

Ditto. I have a piece of thick foil (same thing my windscreen is made of) that I put my ETOWAH II Alcohol stove on. Works great. Ive used it in the mid to upper 20's with no problem. Also have a small piece of TYVEK (Thanks to the good people on this site) that I could use. BD

Outdoorzy
2006-12-05, 13:46
Agreed. I use the windshield that came with my stove - silver/reflective. Same effect with the aluminum foil I would think. Very good at reflecting heat, and not catching the ground on fire ;)

GuffAbbott
2006-12-05, 16:06
I made a windscreen and circular "placemat" for my alcohol stove (Brasslite Turbo II-D) out of aluminum flashing (usually used for roofing, I believe). This has worked fine for me. In colder conditions, I, too, have used sticks and leaves under the "placemat" for insulation. This has worked satisfactorily. I just make sure the sticks and leaves are flat to make a level base for my little kitchen.

I have also successfully used that setup (windscreen and placemat) with a delightful wicking alcohol stove called the Megawick Jr. that hikinghq member incognito graciously gave to me. :biggrin: The Megawick Jr. has much going for it and has boil times in real world conditions similar to the Brasslite. Both are fiendishly simple in design and very easy to use and maintain. For the Megawick Jr. I just had to modify my windscreen with four small holes to insert two steel rods -- to hold up my pot under the flame. In the future I will try to use my "Wal-Mart special" anodized aluminum tent stakes for this purpose. I don't know if anodized aluminum will stay strong enough to hold up my pot while cooking, but I'll give it a whirl.

Although a bit heavier than the traditional aluminum foil, I prefer the flashing for its strength (to hold a pot if necessary) and its reslience and durability. I wrap it around my candle lantern when packed in a neoprene case, where the flashing serves double duty protecting the lantern while I hike.

Just Jeff
2006-12-05, 16:22
I just make sure the sticks and leaves are flat to make a level base for my little kitchen.

This is a big reason I made the Nesquik setup (http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeGearNesquik.html)...I didn't like the stability (or lack of) with other alcohol stove stands I used. I basically took a Nesquik can, cut off the top and punched air holes around the bottom, then drilled holes in the sides to slide in some gutter nails for the pot stand. Now it's really tough to tip over, and there's zero chance of the pot slipping off if it gets bumped or the ground isn't exactly level. All that stability for the stand, plus it's a windscreen and groundcover, it protects the Foster's pot when it's packed up, and in a pinch I could make a wood-burning stove from it.

It's probably a bit heavier than a flashing windscreen, but flashing doesn't come with Nesquik inside, either!

GuffAbbott
2006-12-05, 23:05
Just Jeff, the Nesquik can is a terrific idea :adore:, but it wouldn't work with my cookpot; the Nesquick can is too small in diameter.

The flashing works great with my stoves. I haven't had any mishaps or spills. I could probably devise a way to attach the "placemat" to the windscreen, but I haven't had the need.

Now that I've made that bold pronouncement, I've cursed myself. I'm sure I'll tip the pot on my next outing! :ahhhhh:

Just Jeff
2006-12-06, 00:01
I used flashing with the same kind of holes/gutter nails setup for the Walmart grease pot I used when I first got the alcohol stove. Worked fine, but I was pretty surprised to see the big charred spot on the ground when I first used it! An aluminum foil square made a fine ground cover, though.

I down-sized the pot, which is why I needed a new windscreen...so that's when I got the Nesquik idea. Took forever to find the right can, though...and I looked pretty funny with my tape measure on all the big cans in the grocery store! There are a lot of 3.5" cans out there when you're looking for 4"...

oops56
2006-12-06, 01:30
Well Just Jeff you did not look hard enough the short dinty moore beef can is 4-1/4 o d plus its got a liner so you can cook in as pot plus if you got the new type can opener that cuts top off it can be used as a lid

Just Jeff
2006-12-06, 12:16
How tall is it? I needed it tall enough to put the stove inside, sit the pot inside with enough separation, and extend up the pot enough to be effective as a windscreen. The Nesquik is 4-1/4" tall...I could probably get away with 3-3/4" but not much shorter. Is the Dinty Moore somewhere around there?

oops56
2006-12-06, 13:33
How tall is it? I needed it tall enough to put the stove inside, sit the pot inside with enough separation, and extend up the pot enough to be effective as a windscreen. The Nesquik is 4-1/4" tall...I could probably get away with 3-3/4" but not much shorter. Is the Dinty Moore somewhere around there?

there is to sizes small and big small about 4 in tall big about 8 in tall

JAK
2006-12-06, 16:34
I find this most challenging in winter with lots of snow when you just want a small fire to make coffee. Blue foam pad with aluminum tape on one side might work but I haven't field test it yet. Depends on how hot the bottom of the stove gets. Kevlar cloth with aluminum tape on both side would be more fireproof. Fibreglass cloth with aluminum tape on both side should work also, if it stays together. Blue foam would be lighter and more insulating and potentially multi-purpose but it might melt down when the going gets hot.

p.s. Here's a weird thought. I would open a new thread if I really thought it might go somewhere, but it would be interesting to build a stove into the snow. The snow would provide structure, and keep you stove material from getting too hot. The stove material would need to have some insulation to keep too much snow from melting. Blue foam pad and aluminum tape maybe. You could get a pretty good draft going if the snow bank was deep enough. Might work well in a snow trench type of shelter, or if you just want to hunker down out of the wind for a hot lunch.

dropkick
2006-12-06, 21:04
I have a small piece of 1/4 inch plywood that I carry in cold/snowy weather for under my stove. It fits into my pot (along with my stand and windscreen).

I didn't plan it, or make it special. I just happened apon it, and picked it up.

Thought about replacing it, but I don't know what I could get that would be as sturdy, lightweight, fire/heat proof (somewhat), and have the insulating qualities for cold weather stove use.

Turk
2006-12-06, 21:38
In 3 season climate, I cook on the bare ground. In winter I usually lay a few fairly long logs across the snow and build the fire on that. Snow melts under them and creates a basin for updraft. Also why they need to be a couple feet long. Great for cooking as the coal bed is uniform and linear. Also very
stable for pots. Beneath the fire rack you can warm food and even do some slow low temp baking if you devise some tricks for keeping ashes, and water out of the food and yourself from getting burnt.

Iceman
2006-12-06, 23:50
Here is what I have come up with for my overnight kitchens, cooking lots for four. Tons of hot drinks, multiple meals.....lots of stove melting in...

I have a thin sheet of aluminum that I have mounted some threaded attachment points for my Brunton Optimus Nova Multi Fuel Stove. I place my trangia on a snow plate next to the setup, but all of these eventually melt in due to the heat. I have to continually watch things or get spillage.... This gear fits great in my pulk bag. I wouldnt pack this stuff on my back....

oops56
2006-12-07, 01:15
You are a nice man feeding the birds

bird dog
2006-12-07, 02:50
Here is what I have come up with for my overnight kitchens, cooking lots for four. Tons of hot drinks, multiple meals.....lots of stove melting in...

I have a thin sheet of aluminum that I have mounted some threaded attachment points for my Brunton Optimus Nova Multi Fuel Stove. I place my trangia on a snow plate next to the setup, but all of these eventually melt in due to the heat. I have to continually watch things or get spillage.... This gear fits great in my pulk bag. I wouldnt pack this stuff on my back....

Looks like a commercial photo for REI Iceman. BTW, theres a large bird on your pot that is getting ready to eat your food. (They dont call me Bird Dog for nothing) :bandit:

BD

Iceman
2006-12-07, 10:18
Thanks OOPs.

BD, actually we were eating a whole pan of birds, that one just escaped. :biggrin:

dropkick
2006-12-08, 01:50
Just got another idea for a different windshield.

Had a similar idea once a long time ago but couldn't find a can to satisfy me, so I went with the more traditional ring of flashing. - Still think it might be one of my better ideas though so I thought I'd share it.

-Idea and drawing are rough but I think it would work fairly well.
You wouldn't have to worry about wind direction, and the tripod legs made from bolts would provide good stability.
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-3/1165284/stoveshield.gif

Turk
2006-12-08, 09:16
Nice setup Iceman. Alot of dishes there :biggrin: Looks very efficient considering the number of people you cook for.
How much fuel you use in a day with a rig of that size? I am wondering
as I am looking to buy something for my family camping with the wife.

Iceman
2006-12-08, 11:22
Turk, here is my winter kitchen:

For day trips, carried on the pulk, not on my back...
Trangia Trangia 25-4 set, IE: Nr. 25-4/100254
Stove with
2 Saucepans in aluminium, 1.75 and 1.5 litre,1 Kettle in aluminium, 0.9 litre
1 Non-stick frypan, 22 cm,2 Windshields (upper and lower),1 Burner,1 Handle
1 Strap,Weight 1290 g (data from Trangia.com)
(4) insulated mugs with lids.
(4) cheapo plastic bowls. (Wallmart)
(4) mre spoons
I carry Heet fuel in a normal alum. fuel bottle, since the plastic bottles can pose a problem resealing...

For overnight trips, like pictured above, I also carry along my aluminum stove support, Optimus Nova Pressure fuel stove, folding wind guard, and a large 1.8L camp boiler for melting lots of snow. Plus, a big ass alum frypan. Iceman gets hungry in the snow, so do the kids and wife, we eat good at 4500'...

For Bkfst, I usually whip up some cinnamon rolls in the frypan to get everyone out of their bags, and some cocoa. I bring along a 32ounce nalgene bottle filled at home with eggs, milk, cheese, and cut up little smokies...Fry this up in the megafrypan and drop some bisquits in the middle as the eggscramble is mostly done, yum!

Fuel, I bring too much. I am always worried about getting buried and having to keep the family warm with warm fluid intake, so I always pack a ton. Always on the pulk, so weight not a factor. When the kids get older and we can snowhoe without sleds, I will count ounces, probably revisit the whole issue, but for now, load it up and go.

dropkick
2006-12-09, 06:28
Iceman,
I still have that photo with what you were carrying last year.
Looks like your going ultralight now.
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-3/1165284/snowbed.jpg

Just Jeff
2006-12-09, 11:51
Great. Now my wife wants to go camping with Iceman. Won't go camping with me, but give her a queen size bed and a cup of coffee, and she'll go with you. Thanks. :D

bird dog
2006-12-09, 13:18
And its a sleigh bed....Nice touch DK.

I bet he is wearing one of Turks super UL backpack systems too! :ahhhhh:

BD

Iceman
2006-12-09, 21:06
Dropkick, still get a kick out of that one.... Next time you have some free time on your hands let me know and I will change my avatar, give you some new material to work with!:biggrin:

Just Jeff, was it the cinnamon rolls and cocoa, the big fat breakfast, or the service? (I do all our camp cooking...cleaning...or my wife won't go with...)

Just Jeff
2006-12-09, 21:31
Service? She didn't say anything about service...

SowthEfrikan
2006-12-13, 21:33
Also just use a flat rock - usually the one that I used to knock stakes into the ground.