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chats72
2006-12-08, 10:14
Wet cold weather is coming or already here. Do the good folks of Sgt. Rock's Hiking HQ have any ideas for waterproofing hiking boots? Some are all leather or all fabric, some are combos.

deadeye
2006-12-08, 11:45
I use mink oil or SnoSeal for leather, both work pretty well. When it's cold enough, waterproofing isn't really much of an issue - nothing melts!

Fabric boots better have a WB lining, or yer up a creek.

We have real winter up here - I stick with leather (or rubber if conditions warrant - LL Bean boots are popular for good reason)

chats72
2006-12-08, 12:24
Thanks. Here in NYC, and hiking up in the 'wildeness' north of here, we do get wet and snowed upon. 'Tis the the season to be ........'
To be specific, I wear Dunham boots, because they come in wide and very wide sizes and they are very comfortable. They don't have the last wearing characteristics that many look for but they are reasonably priced and replaceable every other season. Anyway that said. both are mostly leather with touches of fabric. After cleaning them off i have followed the instructions on NikWax - for leather and fabic and for leather alone -it's a liquid wax. Each shoe gets a separate treatment due to the combo percentages. Here is my big wquestion: I am wondering if it is advisable to do two coats. Some question, huh?

chats72
2006-12-08, 12:26
Thanks. Here in NYC, and hiking up in the 'wildeness' north of here, we do get wet and snowed upon. 'Tis the the season to be ........'
To be specific, I wear Dunham boots, because they come in wide and very wide sizes and they are very comfortable. They don't have the last wearing characteristics that many look for but they are reasonably priced and replaceable every other season. Anyway that said. both are mostly leather with touches of fabric. After cleaning them off i have followed the instructions on NikWax - for leather and fabic and for leather alone -it's a liquid wax. Each shoe gets a separate treatment due to the combo percentages. Here is my big wquestion: I am wondering if it is advisable to do two coats. Some question, huh? ( I am told my reply is too short and to add ten characters?)

TeeDee
2006-12-08, 17:22
I use the Kiwi Mink Oil (w/silicone). Seems to work well for me. My feet stay dry when wearing leather. I reapply often. Don't know if that is strictly necessary, but I do it anyway.

Turk
2006-12-08, 18:45
sealskinz waterblocker socks. Accept no substitutes.
Doesn't matter if its a knock off, or even another type of
sealskinz. The website claims all sealskinz are created equal.
They just plain aren't. If you really really need to stay dry.
Its gotta say "Waterblocker" on a genuine skealskinz box of
socks. The waterblocker socks are the only sealskinz that
say "fully immersible" right on the box.

Waterproof boots are great. But great socks, are a fool proof
backup system.

deadeye
2006-12-08, 20:26
For sure, Sealskinz are great - just don't get too warm, or you'll have the funkiest feet you ever pulled out of a boot. :ahhhhh:

Iceman
2006-12-08, 21:54
I treat all of our leather boots with cheapo silicone spray. I have found that mulltiple coats, allowing time to dry between coats works well. I seal boots way in advance of using them. Make sure to remove the laces, and prop open the tongue area by spreading the flaps with a popsicle stick or similar prop. Also, if the boots have sewn on soles, be sure to seal the exposed threads which go thru the sole. (Lots of folks forget this place...) Any areas that look worn you can first treat with a dab of shoegoo, prior to sealing. When I see an area that looks loose, or stretched (300+lbs plus 40lbs+ of gear tries boots...) I shoegoo it a day in advance of sealing, then seal the boots in the backyard, on a sheet of cardboard, drying between coats. Works for leather boots out here in our rainforest.

dropkick
2006-12-09, 06:21
They always say not to, and it'll ruin your boots....
But I've been using vegetable oil on my leather boots for years, and have never had a problem. (I have a pair of boots that I have used this on for many years and I still wear them)

In real wet weather it doesn't last as long as the 'made for' waterproofers (at least I don't think it does). But all I do in that case is rub it down weekly, or give it a quick spray of Pam in the morning.

The first time I do it for the winter I do a really good job and let it sit for awhile before I rub off any excess. After that I just give it a quick going over occasionally, usually with a little bit of oil poured in a napkin.

oops56
2006-12-09, 09:32
Dropkick boots are survival boots just cut them in peices and cook already got vegetable oil

TeeDee
2006-12-09, 16:45
Dropkick boots are survival boots just cut them in peices and cook already got vegetable oil


Survival for who??? Dropkick or the critters??

Seems that with all that vegetable oil, they would attract anything within a mile or 2. :biggrin:

KLeth
2006-12-10, 02:45
For my leather hiking boots I use SilProof from Meindl. For my other leather boots I use a good leatheroil. Leatheroil also makes the boot nice and flexible so it can be worn properly in. When heating it like wax, it will get into the leather much faster.
Wax is good but has to be carefully melted into the leather, elsewise it will rapidly get worn off, the same goes for ordinary shoe/boot polish.

chats72
2006-12-12, 15:20
thanks for your help everyone. Well, i took care of the waterproofing using the Nikwax(es) from Campmor and all was well 'cause it was dry weekend.

This next comment probably belongs on another thread but why bother. I camped out with my son's new scout troop this past weekend, about 70 miles north of NYC. Overnight temps got down to about 22* or so. I took an REI tent and left it in the car. The kids, and scouters, all slept out in their bags, no tents. After 'warming up' I ended up wearing a tee shirt, long sleeve shirt, shorts and socks, all synthetic. Other than cold feet i was toasty in my 20* bag. But, I have to do a better job of balancing the temps throughout my sleeping bag and figuring out how to stay put on my Thermarest inflatable. I am thinking running a strap around the bag and pad and hope they stay together. Any ideas about this?

It was a great night out. The sky was clear and I was impressed that the kids went tentless without a complaint.

Take-a-knee
2006-12-12, 18:11
I've read there is some sort of spray that tennis players spray on their racket handles that is supposed to make a thermarest slip resistant, I've never tried it though. You could just add a bivy sack to your kit.

bird dog
2006-12-12, 21:40
How about velcro? BD