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Hollowdweller
2006-12-25, 10:55
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c19/hollowdweller/mchrst.jpg

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c19/hollowdweller/christmasshot1.jpg

oops56
2006-12-25, 11:19
Where is the Hatfields??

Take-a-knee
2006-12-25, 14:59
HD, not to be a stickler, but I recommend you keep your finger outside the trigger guard until you've lined up your sights on whatever you intend to shoot. Good gunhandling skills begin with us.

Redleg
2006-12-26, 12:42
Excersize your (god given, higher power given...whatever) Rights.

...But every one of us who's ever taught, or run a range, is going to do the trigger comment. All of us. You can retire the sargent, you cannot make him shut up.
(I said the same thing. Programming.) (Then my boy laughed at me.)

Packed to go to the range right now. .22 Silhouette.
jaf

JAK
2006-12-26, 13:43
So how many calories do you burn exercising these rights?
( I had a little too much turkey last night, that and all the baked goods.) :)

stray1
2006-12-26, 14:28
Nice pic! I can see a common bond between you. I'm sure the neighbors are very quiet and well mannered. :)

I didn't want to make the "primary safety" comment but , I'm glad you did TAK. I was trying to not sound like the range control guy. :)


Sergeant = "No one is more professional than I. I am a Non Commissioned Officer, a leader of Soldiers....."

Merry Christmas

SowthEfrikan
2006-12-26, 15:45
Well, I suppose it's Ok to mention I bought my hubby a Marlin 1895 .45-70 for Christmas. I'm not a gun fan but he grew up around them, is a crack shot, and this seemed to make him happy. Where and when he is going to use this is something else. I think he is now hoping to run into a bear or lion or something. Men can be very odd. Adorable, but odd.

Hollowdweller
2006-12-26, 15:53
Ha! Good on the gun safety but the pic was a setup to look "armed and dangerous":biggrin:

Sounds like it worked, at least the dangerous part:ahhhhh:

Seriously that's one of the first things I tell people too. That and never ever click a gun even if it's unloaded, and always remember where the muzzle is pointing. Had too many guns pointed directly at me at gunshows and such.

Take-a-knee
2006-12-26, 16:29
The late-great Col Jeff Cooper left us with quite a legacy. His greatest may be his rules for gunhandling, Interestingly, you have to violate two to injure someone, IE point a gun in an unsafe direction and place pressure on the trigger. If you violate one you only scare people and embarrass yourself. Those who are trained to only press the trigger while lining up sights can carry loaded weapons around a crowd of people and do so safely. Those who haven't been so conditioned will always be a danger to those around them. The "hot range" phenomenon started at Cooper's Gunsite and other civilian schools, was brought to Delta Force ranges, then to SF CIF companies, and unfortunantly , from what I saw in Iraq, that is as far as it has progressed. The aforementioned units don't shoot their own people, this is still a common occurence in the regular army, and it is due to a lack of training and range time.

Hollowdweller
2006-12-26, 16:35
There used to be a gun store where I used to go as a kid. It had a sign up "$25 for the first click $50 for the second click" and so on. The owner had nearly been shot by somebody who clicked a gun they brought in they "knew" was unloaded.:afraid:

Iceman
2006-12-26, 21:25
Yup, and you should see the roof of our law enforcement range, has a few holes in it, and one in the wall of our range class room. :banghead:

bird dog
2006-12-28, 20:17
Yup, and you should see the roof of our law enforcement range, has a few holes in it, and one in the wall of our range class room. :banghead:

We got one in the range guys leg! (Wasnt me)! BD

dropkick
2006-12-30, 02:21
When I was little my Dad wouldn't even let me point a toy gun at people (playing cowboys and indians sucked at my house).
On the other hand when I was a little older and wanted a BB gun, he gave me a .22 instead.

As we had weapons around the house my Dad took what I think is the more intelligent option, he taught me about their use and misuse early instead of locking them away or trying to hide them.

As a result I wasn't sneaking them out just to handle or to show off to friends as a kid. And I also believe that I'm still one of the safest people to be around when the weapons are out.