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TeeDee
2007-01-04, 19:06
Just received a new skinning knive (like I need another knife ?!?!) and the following instructions were included:

1. On knives featuring a locking device, the
lock is an added safety measure. Like aIl
mechanical devices it can fail. Never assume
the locking device on any knife is an absolute
guarantee against accidental folding. Use the
knife in a manner that if the lock fails for any
reason. you will not be injured.
2. On knives equipped with an opening stud.
use extra care, They are designed to be
opened easily with one hand. Never carry or
use them in such a manner that they could
be opened accidentally.
3. Never use your knife as a screwdriver, chisel,
punch or prying lever. Never hammer on the
blade or handle.
4. Do not throw your knife or attempt to cut
nails, bolts. wire or other metals.
5. Keep the locking device free from debris.
Clean it often and lightly oil it occasionally.
6. Never sharpen a knife on a power driven
grinding wheel. It will burn the temper from
the blade.
7. Please remember that pocket knives, by their
own unique design, cannot take punishment
expected of heavier folding or fixed-blade
knives.
8. Whenever a fixed-blade knife is inserted into
the sheath, care should be taken to ensure that
the blade is properly lined up so it won 't cut
through the sheath causing personal injury.
9. Blades should be kept clean and dry. A light
coat of oil will help prevent rust.

Question: how much of the above instructions did you not already know??

It would seem to me that anybody buying a skinning knife would already pretty much know how to handle a knife.

I think that the lawyers have shaped too much of our current culture.

jimtanker
2007-01-04, 19:12
I was taught all of those by my father way back when. I bet if you were to ask someone growing up nowdays they would have no idea.

Great post!

stray1
2007-01-04, 20:58
Oops! I broke rule #3(all) today!:ahhhhh:

Dont tell anyone or they may try to repo my knife!(Sebenza):bootyshak
:biggrin:

oops56
2007-01-04, 21:43
Well i paid for it and i well do as i dam please to maney donts and no dos it this way:bike: :bike:

deadeye
2007-01-04, 22:00
I'll admit to not knowing #6 (that a grinding wheel could overheat the blade & ruin the temper), but I don't have a grinder, so I didn't need to know:aetsch:

oops56
2007-01-04, 22:18
Deadeye its not that:confused :confused: type of grinder its the one you eat

Mutinousdoug
2007-01-04, 22:48
Stray1:
The 1st thing I do with a stockman knife is grind the pen blade to a small screwdriver (ON THE END). Just on the end,guys. It's a tool, right? Not a jewel.
Jeeze!
Grinding wheel slowed down to less than 1K rpm is useful. Variable transformer or resistor, carefully applied, suffice. A gear reducer (if you can find one), or pully reduction is more appropriate.
If the burr changes color; you're too hot.

bodiak
2007-01-06, 16:18
Intersesting aside: Back in the middle ages, a knife would be hardened by heating it cherry-red and sticking it in a pig to cool. They didn't know why it worked, but it did. Now we know that it's the carbon being absorbed. Case hardening, really

Turk
2007-01-08, 19:23
The problem with those knife instructions are that they dont
tell me which end is the sharp one.:biggrin:

stray1
2007-01-08, 22:45
Sounds like we should just keep the knives in our pockets and only open letters with them and then perform PMCS(preventive maintenance, calibration and safety).

BTW- I broke rule #3 again today. Sorry

dropkick
2007-01-09, 06:16
Intersesting aside: Back in the middle ages, a knife would be hardened by heating it cherry-red and sticking it in a pig to cool. They didn't know why it worked, but it did. Now we know that it's the carbon being absorbed. Case hardening, really
I've read somewhere that they were fond of using slaves the same way pre/early middle ages. I can't remember where I read it though.

I do remember that it was a very good steel and that they were secretive about the process (Damascus? Maybe - I do know that we don't know how they made Damascus swords, so that might be it).

For some reason Persia (now Iran) keeps popping up in my mind, but as that is where all metal work started it would probably be in the article.

dropkick
2007-01-09, 06:22
The problem with those knife instructions are that they dont tell me which end is the sharp one.:biggrin:
If it's slippery you have hold of the wrong end.




Bet I get some shudders out of that one....

jimtanker
2007-01-09, 08:36
The problem with those knife instructions are that they dont
tell me which end is the sharp one.:biggrin:

Those would be intructions that would be needed now days alright.

JAK
2007-01-09, 10:54
The problem with those knife instructions are that they dont
tell me which end is the sharp one.:biggrin:
If I am holding the knife, the other end is always the sharp one.:stupido2: