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blackdog
2007-01-28, 16:57
Anders Jonsson has been experimenting again. This time it's a windscreen for alcohol stoves. Pretty similar to what you're used to but... sewn.

http://www.andersj.se/vindskydd1.htm

The page is only available in swedish but Anders is a master at creating good illustrations and having good photos, so you should understand well enough.

(If the text above contains typos or strange language, just remember that english is my third language...)

Frolicking Dino
2007-01-28, 18:15
Hmmmm... add detachable top and bottom and sew on a couple of velcro strips - cozy + windscreen....

Take-a-knee
2007-01-28, 18:57
Blackdog, it that just tin foil? Or is there something else inside the foil? If it is just foil, how many layers is it? That looks like it would be quite durable and light for sure.

sailingsoul
2007-01-28, 22:42
Looks like it's thicker than tin/alum' foil but not much. Also no trace of filler or threads like in a space blanket. This reminds me of being a kid and watching "Lost in Space" on TV. Sorry Iceman but this was way before we discovered, watching TV turns ones brain to cream cheese. I also haven't killed my TV (yet) I just might during the next commercial. Anyway, I recall seeing them wearing the metallic fabric clothes and using "space blankets" to shelter from cosmic storms. I would think, "this is a bit hokey". But look at what the future has brought. Items from Lost in Space! SS:captain:
PS: I'm buying stock in any company who makes a fabric with the R value of the space blanket, vapor aspects of gore tex and feel of fleece.

Iceman
2007-01-29, 00:15
SailingSoul, thanks for the honorable mention. I look at the world thru my own fog and foundation of a strange mix of Gilligans Island, Blazing Saddles, Bugs Bunny, Young Frankenstine and the Flintstones. Remember the Sleestaks in Land of the Lost? Yes, my brain has also been molested by these shows. I am doomed.

dropkick
2007-01-29, 01:27
Blackdog,
Neat, I considered making a cloth windscreen at one time but gave up the idea as my plans would have yielded a windscreen that was difficult to set up and wouldn't have given me any significant gains.

--Basically I was going to use the cloth off an ironing board cover, and fiberglass arrow shafts for supports. It was going to be a V-shaped wind block that sat off from the stove.

What did he use for cloth?


Iceman,
The Sleestaks came too late in my development, I was already gone.
I had Johnny Quest, The Herculoids, H.R. Puff-N-Stuff, Bugs, and Matt Dillion to shape my psyche.
All brought to me by the 2 available channels (later we got 3!). And watched on a 13 inch black and white tube-driven t.v. which was mounted inside a large wooden cabinet, with folding doors in front of the screen.

Wish I still had that T.V.
It was top of the line in it's day.
-Gift from my rich Great Uncle.
Probably worth a pretty penny now.

Streamweaver
2007-01-29, 11:57
:confused2 What kind of thread is this guy using? Ive had stoves that would burn the windscreen up ,so I know thread would never last!

Jonas4321
2007-01-29, 14:41
:confused2 What kind of thread is this guy using? Ive had stoves that would burn the windscreen up ,so I know thread would never last!

I used Systranbox.com to (roughly) translate must of what he wrote, and he does make mention that the thread might be a concern. I believe that he is recommending that the thread be positioned so it's kept away from the hottest points (note that it's only exposed inwards on the bottom edge). He also says you could hand sew it with thin wire.

I am wondering if making a hidden seam (folding the foil over inwards after sewing so that none of the thread facing inwards is uncovered) would give additional heat protection.

He seems to be stating that he is using heavy-duty foil.

I wonder what my sewing machine's feed dogs would do to the foil, but it does not seem to have damaged it on his.

Interesting concept! I need to make a height extender for my potstand/windscreen, and I might try this to see how it works.

Skidsteer
2007-01-29, 21:02
:confused2 What kind of thread is this guy using? Ive had stoves that would burn the windscreen up ,so I know thread would never last!


I used Systranbox.com to (roughly) translate must of what he wrote, and he does make mention that the thread might be a concern. I believe that he is recommending that the thread be positioned so it's kept away from the hottest points (note that it's only exposed inwards on the bottom edge). He also says you could hand sew it with thin wire.

I am wondering if making a hidden seam (folding the foil over inwards after sewing so that none of the thread facing inwards is uncovered) would give additional heat protection.

He seems to be stating that he is using heavy-duty foil.

I wonder what my sewing machine's feed dogs would do to the foil, but it does not seem to have damaged it on his.

Interesting concept! I need to make a height extender for my potstand/windscreen, and I might try this to see how it works.

"Unwind" a "thread" from ordinary fiberglass mesh, thread a big ass needle, and hand sew it.

No worries.

TeeDee
2007-01-29, 21:34
Just use the same thread they use in those fire fighting suits - cannot remember the name of the stuff right now - I have seen the thread for sale on some of the sites that sell kevlar thread and some of the other exotic materials.

Take-a-knee
2007-01-29, 22:46
I wish I had an Elna (or Viking) sewing machine like the one in the picture.

Frolicking Dino
2007-01-30, 08:51
I have an Elna and they are wonderful machines for general sewing. However, for many gear projects, I prefer my ancient White - all metal, straight stitch only, cranky until it warms up a bit, can sew thru practically anything and feeder plate isn't as picky about fabric types as Elna.

Rob Rohde-Szudy
2007-02-10, 23:40
I have an old White too. That thing is awesome. 1950's and all metal. I think I paid like $5 at a yard sale. (Basically stole it...) --Rob

blackdog
2007-02-11, 06:28
Blackdog, it that just tin foil? Or is there something else inside the foil? If it is just foil, how many layers is it? That looks like it would be quite durable and light for sure.

It's just (a slightly thicker "barbeque-type") foil, folded. Three layers (look at the illustrations at the bottom of the page).

blackdog
2007-02-11, 06:44
I believe that he is recommending that the thread be positioned so it's kept away from the hottest points (note that it's only exposed inwards on the bottom edge). He also says you could hand sew it with thin wire.

I am wondering if making a hidden seam (folding the foil over inwards after sewing so that none of the thread facing inwards is uncovered) would give additional heat protection.


Original paragraph
"OBS! Det är viktigt att sömmarna hamnar under brännarens överkant, i botten eller på utsidan så de inte skadas av lågan! Ett annat sätt att sy för hand med en tunn metalltråd."

Translated
"Note! It's important that the seams are positioned below the upper edge of the burner, at the bottom or on the outside so that they're not damaged by the flames! An alternative is to use a thin metal wire, sewn by hand."