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View Full Version : New load-reducing Backpack



Amigi
2007-03-03, 23:19
http://www.flurl.com/item/Light_Backpack_u_233585

Iceman
2007-03-04, 01:06
Impressive.

Amigi
2007-03-04, 04:36
Yeah, I thought it was pretty cool. Wanted to share with the heads here. Rock, you got lotsa time on your hands now. Think you can come up with am ION backpack? I cant wait two years for this thing!

shooter
2007-03-05, 15:51
why diden't i thank of that,cool. well i'm off to the shop .

Take-a-knee
2007-03-05, 15:59
There is another way to reduce your load...don't carry so much. It looks like that "load-reducing" contraption would weigh so much you'd have quite a load to "reduce". It may have a military application, they could incorporate it into the exoskeleton project.

SowthEfrikan
2007-03-18, 10:35
I'll take one of those - no more worrying about how to recharge the GPS/Cellular.

By the time they are through design it probably won't be as flexible but still, vritually anything they can come up with along these lines is bound to be an improvement.

Thanks for the link.

deadeye
2007-03-18, 17:31
So let me get this straight: adding heavy springs to my pack will make it lighter? Somebody's messing with the laws of Nature, here.

Just Jeff
2007-03-18, 18:55
Two types of loads you have to carry - dynamic load and static load. This pack weighs more on a scale (static load), but since it doesn't bounce when you walk it actually puts less stress on your muscles...so the dynamic load is less. And since the dynamic load is what actually has an impact on your body, adding this weight makes the pack feel lighter as you walk.

That's their claim anyway, and the theory is there to back it up...interested to see how it works in practice, though. And it sure violates the KISS principle...more moving parts means more breaking parts to repair in the field.

Geo.
2007-03-19, 07:34
That's their claim anyway, and the theory is there to back it up...interested to see how it works in practice, though. And it sure violates the KISS principle...more moving parts means more breaking parts to repair in the field.

Yeah, I'm wondering too, how long would those bungey cord 'springs' last before they start to lose their 'spring'. :frown:
The actual rigid frame looks like it could be a bit uncomfortable compared to a standard internal frame pack and the added height structure on the frame to accommodate those pulleys etc., could be a bit of a hassle pushing through dense scrub. Though I guess that is just a prototype that is being shown.

Amigi
2007-03-19, 08:04
That was just a proof of concept prototype.

TeeDee
2007-03-19, 21:46
Yeah, I'm wondering too, how long would those bungey cord 'springs' last before they start to lose their 'spring'. :frown:
The actual rigid frame looks like it could be a bit uncomfortable compared to a standard internal frame pack and the added height structure on the frame to accommodate those pulleys etc., could be a bit of a hassle pushing through dense scrub. Though I guess that is just a prototype that is being shown.

Now why do you "Practical" people have to go and ruin the day and rain on their nice parade :ahhhhh:

Of course it's the practical people that make it really work :biggrin:

Just Jeff
2007-03-19, 22:49
Hehe - I'm so practical I have 4 different hammock support systems even though the first one worked just fine... :D

Mutinousdoug
2007-03-19, 23:34
Forgive me if I'm wrong, but this contraption does nothing to remove/reduce "total" stress. If I understand correctly, all it does is spread the sine wave over a longer period. That should be fine if it doesn't excede the time between your steps. As far as decreasing your load: not exactly. Might be fine for aching joints (peak stress), but fatigue (total stress) will be about the same. Kinda like hiking poles: load your legs without poles or load your upper body with. Stress is the same, just spread over more muscles.
Not saying it's a bad idea, just objecting to the description.