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Iceman
2007-03-04, 01:28
I have carried a cut down coffee can around my MSR 1 liter titanium kettle for a few years. Have burned wood in it maybe three times, under the kettle. My idea for packing the can around was a backup to my other fuel source for any given trip, and if lost, injured or delayed, as a way to burn a tiny fire in close in a shelter to help stay warm and keep motivated. With all the discussion about Turks Bushbuddy stove (awesome), other wood burners, Martha's flour sifters and the like, I thought I would take a crack at re-inventing a woodstove for my likes.

I wanted to store the stove around the outside of my kettle. I wanted stainless steel. I wanted stability. Nothing worse than tipping over your hobostove and sloshing your dinner into the weeds.

Here is what I have come up with so far. Wallmart flour sifter $4.50. Stainless steel, check. Fits around my kettle by a hair, check. Rig hobo can with some tie outs, check. The only problem so far is I do not know if it works worth a damn or not, too rainy today to test.

Tie outs have a turn in the end to they lock in the top of the stove. For stakes, I intend to use those tiny stainless skewers I use on my thanksgiving Turkey, but have not found any at the store yet...

I am not really concerned with weight since I have already been packing a heavier version of this around for a few years. The top of my stove is actually the bottom of the flour sifter, and I have left a reducer attached because it makes a great pot support and adds rigidty to the design. I am a bit concerned that my top exhaust ports will not be enough. We will see, next dry day....

Also, I do not care if I scar the earth with my design. Boo hoo. Poor earth. So kick some dirt over the scar. Fixed.

Feel free to comment, and shoot holes in the design. Feel free to provide thoughts for improvement.

TeeDee
2007-03-04, 14:12
Iceman - a thought:

using a bottom grate for me really has nothing to do with scarring the earth even though the LNT folks like to thing so. As you say the earth will recover very rapidly. Come back in a year and you will not be able to find the spot. But raising the bottom of the wood pile off the ground with a grate serves 2 purposes:

1. you get a better draft to get oxygen to the burning wood with the air coming in from the bottom of the pile. No need for side vent for drafts. The side vents also tend to allow heat to escape.

2. if you need to use the stove in snow, build a platform with sticks, wet or dry, on the snow and set the stove on the platform, then the bottom grate will keep the fire from burning the platform which tends to submerge stove and all.

incognito
2007-03-04, 16:50
Nice design!!!

Hope you get nice weather soon for a tryout.

Keep us posted.

incognito
2007-03-05, 21:38
Feel free to comment, and shoot holes in the design. Feel free to provide thoughts for improvement.


Speaking of holes, what did you use to make the round holes? They look great!!!

Iceman
2007-03-05, 23:08
Unibit, stepped drill bit.....awesome on sheet metal....

oops56
2007-03-05, 23:16
A electric hole punch

oops56
2007-03-05, 23:17
A electric hole punch for electric boxs

sailingsoul
2007-03-06, 10:40
45 cal. works gooood.

Lanthar
2007-03-06, 15:02
Iceman - a thought:

using a bottom grate for me really has nothing to do with scarring the earth even though the LNT folks like to thing so. As you say the earth will recover very rapidly. Come back in a year and you will not be able to find the spot. But raising the bottom of the wood pile off the ground with a grate serves 2 purposes:

1. you get a better draft to get oxygen to the burning wood with the air coming in from the bottom of the pile. No need for side vent for drafts. The side vents also tend to allow heat to escape.

2. if you need to use the stove in snow, build a platform with sticks, wet or dry, on the snow and set the stove on the platform, then the bottom grate will keep the fire from burning the platform which tends to submerge stove and all.

Teedee's right, a grate won't do jack to keep from harming the earth (double bottoms do... but that gets complicated... besides if I read your comments right, the allure of this is as a really light backup / safety tool), but they really help draft / oxygen supply a lot.

Also, if you find that you're 'snuffing' the fire with your pot (as long as you don't overpack your stove with wood, I don't suspect you will) just make that feed hole a little larger aka J. Falk's Wood Burning Trail Stove (http://site283.webhost4life.com/afmservices/trailgear/falk-wood-stove.htm). Of course, you won't have to make it nearly that large as you already have a lot of vent holes.

Iceman
2007-03-07, 00:30
The grate thingy is a good idea, thanks to both! I am trying to think how to fasten it in place after I dig the kettle out (since I load the stove in the end of the can facing the soil), maybe place a couple of those turkey skewers thru the can, to support the grate above the soil, maybe one inch?

TeeDee
2007-03-07, 21:47
An inch is plenty. I see you have holes around the bottom. Placing the grate at the top edge of those would work really nice.

Lanthar
2007-03-08, 13:21
The grate thingy is a good idea, thanks to both! I am trying to think how to fasten it in place after I dig the kettle out (since I load the stove in the end of the can facing the soil), maybe place a couple of those turkey skewers thru the can, to support the grate above the soil, maybe one inch?

That'd work great, I think. Like TD said, drill a couple sets of small holes (just big enough for the skewers, just above those breather holes you already have and stick the grate in. Oh, and the grate doesn't HAVE to be the full diameter of the stove... you could actually make it small enough to nest in your pot (or in the tapered area of your stove when you're nesting) and you'd still get the benefit

Iceman
2007-03-08, 23:32
OK, sounds good. I will try to get at it this weekend, see how it burns too...I enjoy the color changes stoves take on when you finally get to fire things off.....

Iceman
2007-03-11, 18:46
Teedee and Lanthar, the grate works great! (?)

I installed the grate just over the air holes at the bottom of the stove, and fired it off today, worked awesome. Fire took, burned hot. The air holes at the top turned out to be a great way to load fuel, and to pre-dry the next fuel to shove into the stove. I kept feeding moist fir brances into the holes, and they would smoke and burn at first, but as the temp rose, and all the twigs sticking out kept drying off, the fire got much hotter as I jammed these dried tips into the burn chamber. My Ti kettle did get blackened. More like an oily wood resin or pitch residue, rather than sooty. Sticky, not sooty...? Make sense? Also, this stove kicked out enough heat around it's perimeter, that the bricks under and around the stove started to dry out. I think I would be inclinded to stack my moist fuels around "close in" to help dry them out as I burned in this stove.

Anyway, this hiker likes this cheapa$$ stove. I will keep it in my pack with my kettle, for hunting season, as a mid day coffee burner, or when bad things happen and I need a survival stove.

TeeDee
2007-03-12, 18:30
Iceman - really nice stove. Great idea.

Lanthar
2007-03-13, 11:56
I love the "feed the fir sticks slowly" to let them dry out idea...

Okay.... so, in the first picture I was going to ask why you made a basket out of the mesh... until I realize it was just refelections from the shiny (apparently yet to be used) sidewalls inside the burner.

So, the holes you already had were more than enough for it to breath?

Iceman
2007-03-13, 23:36
Lanthar, the holes did seem to allow enough combustion air for a good fire. No math here, just termited the top and bottom of the can. The "feed the fir stick" holes just happened. Actually worked out well, cause I was working with wet sticks. I bet in the summer, they ignite and burn off before you can feed them in.....

Here is the best pic of the holes at the top and bottom. Shiny interior is a bit misleading.

Lanthar
2007-03-14, 09:12
Lanthar, the holes did seem to allow enough combustion air for a good fire. No math here, just termited the top and bottom of the can. The "feed the fir stick" holes just happened. Actually worked out well, cause I was working with wet sticks. I bet in the summer, they ignite and burn off before you can feed them in.....

Here is the best pic of the holes at the top and bottom. Shiny interior is a bit misleading.

Isn't it funny how much pre-thought we can put into analyzing something like a fire can (I do this all the time), when all we really need to do is light it up and see? Woodfires have a tendency of figuring how to burn all on their own... :biggrin:

Iceman
2007-03-14, 10:25
Isn't it funny how much pre-thought we can put into analyzing something like a fire can (I do this all the time), when all we really need to do is light it up and see? Woodfires have a tendency of figuring how to burn all on their own... :biggrin:

Or, isn't it sad how unimpressed most of your friends are about these things? I may get done demonstrating how cool my alcohol stove is to someone, and they raise an eyebrow, or ask "huh, how come you don't just bring a normal stove..."

oops56
2007-03-18, 19:24
Wow i just got this fan a little big for hobo stove but could keep the fire place going or in tent or on picnic table anyway i will find a use for it

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ih=007&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWN%3AIT&viewitem=&item=170090053062&rd=1&rd=1

JAK
2007-03-21, 18:07
Or, isn't it sad how unimpressed most of your friends are about these things? I may get done demonstrating how cool my alcohol stove is to someone, and they raise an eyebrow, or ask "huh, how come you don't just bring a normal stove..."Which brings up the question, why haven't any of us asked oops56 what happened to his frying pan. My guess is that it is not so much that we don't care, but that we don't need to ask.

OK, I'll ask anyway. Oops56, tell us the story. :)

p.s. Cool fan. Did I read correctly that it runs on a clock spring?

oops56
2007-03-21, 18:44
Well [You ask for it] remember that tv show oh i forgot your to young .The fan is a wind up got to make key first. On that fry pan i cut the bottom out to make a heat sink for my oven . I can get it to heat up OK and hold it at 250 f or any where i need to the oven is made out of a flour canister using a Coleman stove on kerosene:beer: :beer:
click to make bigger

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d52/oops62/th_lamp2.jpg (http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d52/oops62/lamp2.jpg)

JAK
2007-03-21, 22:20
I go back about as far as Green Acres, and a Canadian show called the Forest Rangers, but that's about it. I figured you were up to something with the piece cut out. Sounds very reasonable. Well done. :beer: :beer: So what was the TV show?

Lanthar
2007-03-22, 10:40
Wow i just got this fan a little big for hobo stove but could keep the fire place going or in tent or on picnic table anyway i will find a use for it

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ih=007&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWN%3AIT&viewitem=&item=170090053062&rd=1&rd=1

Cool... nice find... from the pics it looks pretty durable, how's it feel?

Iceman
2007-03-28, 00:30
Unibit, stepped drill bit.....awesome on sheet metal....

On sale now at Harbor Freight, set of 3 unibits, for $10.00. I have not used this specific manufacturer (china) yet, but these type of bits work nice for punching super clean holes in thin metal.....

http://www.harborfreight.com/ search product number 91616 (Couldn't get the link to take you straight to the drill bit, you will have to search for item# 91616 to see the bits I am talking about. )

Jonas4321
2007-03-28, 19:33
On sale now at Harbor Freight, set of 3 unibits, for $10.00. I have not used this specific manufacturer (china) yet, but these type of bits work nice for punching super clean holes in thin metal.....

http://www.harborfreight.com/ search product number 91616 (Couldn't get the link to take you straight to the drill bit, you will have to search for item# 91616 to see the bits I am talking about. )

Iceman-

I have been eyeing these at Harbor Freight (well, among other stuff I probably will never use), and I was wondering how you use them on thin metal like aluminum flashing. Do you place the flashing onto a scrap board and then drill into both?

thx

Iceman
2007-03-29, 00:05
You can back up your project to avoid denting the metal on the way in...sometimes I back things up if really fragile. I did not on this stove, cause of the contour. Many times I will strike my project with an awl first to make sure the bit starts in the correct spot, or even drill a tiny pilot hole in the sweet spot first, to help the step bit get started. Play with your drill speed to get things right. I also put a circle of masking tape on the step bit so I can see when to stop drilling. I was a general contractor for 10 years, and always had to worry over the finished product in order to get paid. Now, I usually could care less if things arent quite so perfect. Someone here mentioned drilling holes with a handgun, I am starting to think this approach might make a great stove, good campfire topic...

Rosaleen
2007-03-29, 20:08
Hi, Guys!

I do enjoy reading entries on this site. As much as I love my WomenHiker "Sisters of the Heart," it is refreshing to visit here. Punch a hole with a .45 cal! I would NEVER see an entry like that from my gal-pals!

Thanks for the laugh!

Rosaleen

dropkick
2007-03-31, 00:25
Hi, Guys!

I do enjoy reading entries on this site. As much as I love my WomenHiker "Sisters of the Heart," it is refreshing to visit here. Punch a hole with a .45 cal! I would NEVER see an entry like that from my gal-pals!

Thanks for the laugh!

Rosaleen
Even after women's lib many women still aren't comfortable with using tools and taking a part in fine craftsmanship.

Rosaleen
2007-03-31, 09:08
Even "Women's Lib" can't fix all mindsets. Unfortunately, I am often told that I "think like a guy." It is SUPPOSED to be a compliment. I like to backpack, tinker with making things, etc. Those "tinkerings" run the gamut of woodworking to jewelry making. I like my SmartWool socks and my silk lingerie. Maybe I'm an anomaly.

Rosaleen

TeeDee
2007-03-31, 19:02
Even "Women's Lib" can't fix all mindsets. Unfortunately, I am often told that I "think like a guy." It is SUPPOSED to be a compliment. I like to backpack, tinker with making things, etc. Those "tinkerings" run the gamut of woodworking to jewelry making. I like my SmartWool socks and my silk lingerie. Maybe I'm an anomaly.

Rosaleen

If there were more anomalies, then they would be normal :biggrin:

oops56
2007-04-06, 16:41
They say burning fungus keeps the bugs away. Well if you put a piece of fungus in a tea infuser just a little fiber glass insulation in bottom cause it got holes in bottom to keep ash in or maybe not this is my first try. Whats good about it can hang it anywhere even in your tent or any place near you be carefully it gets hot


http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d52/oops62/stoves%202/th_teab.jpg (http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d52/oops62/stoves%202/teab.jpg)