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Rhino-lfl
2007-04-06, 16:19
Grab some large jalapenos, split them a little and remove the seeds.

Mix up in a food processor and process well:
A half can of corned beef (not with hash, just the meat), equal portion of shredded cheddar cheese, a few sun dried tomatoes, a few garlic cloves, whatever fresh herbs you have laying around, pepper, and salt.

Grab you a spoon, and stuff the peppers with the mix.

Wrap the pepper with a slice of bacon and fasten together with a wooden toothpick.

Freeze'em.

Take'em with ya on the trail and after they thaw, cook'em over fire and eat'em up.

You can also grill'em, and then wrap and freeze'em, then just warm them over or beside a fire after they thaw to make the bacon crispy.

Habaneras work great for this too if you're brave enough (these are half habaneras and half jalapenos).

BEAMarshall
2007-04-09, 12:34
for reduced spiciness/heat- also scrape out the white ribs/attachment points inside the peppers.
sounds yummy! thanks!

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-09, 15:07
for reduced spiciness/heat- also scrape out the white ribs/attachment points inside the peppers.
sounds yummy! thanks!

You want the heat! I sometimes stuff my jalapenos with smaller hot peppers like thai or tabasco. The only reason for scrapping the seeds out is to make some room for stuffing.

BEAMarshall
2007-04-09, 18:01
I find that the heat overpowers the flavor of the chili itself; rendering taste-buds non-operational. For just gobs of heat I go straight to powdered Habaneros.

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-10, 15:00
Have you ever tried Bhut Jolokia peppers from india? I'm starting some from seeds now, their scoville rating is something close to 1.2 million, about 6 times as hot as a habanara. I can't wait to get them in the ground, then in my mouth.

oops56
2007-04-10, 15:42
Hot peppers yep use to love them but now that i am older they burn on both ends :bootyshak

dropkick
2007-04-11, 02:09
My neighbor used to grow these tiny peppers, looked like a miniture japaleno.
They would grow in a small bunch and would be green, yellow, and red.
The entire pepper was only about 1/2 inch in length.
We never found out what they were called.
They were the hottest peppers I've ever tasted.

My neighbor saved the seeds and replanted every year.
Didn't know where they came from, they were originally volunteers. (volunteer plants are weeds that you keep).

When I first saw them I ate one, and spent the rest of the day regreting it.
-This was back when I ate hot food every day (I was married to a Thai) and back then habenero's seemed extremely mild to me, I used to eat them like peanuts.

My neighbor once made 3 gallons of chili and put half of a pepper in it It drowned out all the other flavors, and almost everyone thought it was to hot to eat.

Wish I knew what they were and had some seeds.
- Don't really know why I want this, as they were almost useless for anything (except cruel jokes and feeding to rugby players), but.....

Thudley
2007-05-06, 11:26
Have you ever tried Bhut Jolokia peppers from india? I'm starting some from seeds now, their scoville rating is something close to 1.2 million, about 6 times as hot as a habanara. I can't wait to get them in the ground, then in my mouth.

Oh man. Now I know why you carry the Vodka, Rhino.

I'm definitely a low-spice type. While I was based in Thailand, the chow hall cook (a local) had to prepare a separate dish for me almost every day. The Thais tend to put those long red dried peppers into everything. He took mercy on me after watching me try to sweat out a few meals with little success. I wound up surviving on care packages from home. :eating:

KLeth
2007-05-07, 01:37
My neighbor used to grow these tiny peppers, looked like a miniture japaleno.
That could be Piri piri (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piri_piri) or Thai pepper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilli_padi)
They are quite hot, but very good with lamb.

dropkick
2007-05-07, 05:58
That could be Piri piri (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piri_piri) or Thai pepper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilli_padi)
They are quite hot, but very good with lamb.
No, those aren't it.
It would have several peppers growing fairly close together on the same branch and some would be green, some yellow, and some red.
And trust me, just by reading about them I can tell they are no where near as hot.