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Rhino-lfl
2007-04-24, 13:55
So I've never stayed at a shelter or anything, just made my own trail and sat in the hammock drinking whiskey. But if I wanted to carry a chair, or make a chair, what do you folks do? Just sit on a pad? I'm curious because I never put any thought into a chair until right now lol.

GGS
2007-04-24, 14:23
If the ground is dry I'll just sit on the ground

If the ground is wet I'll use a piece of blue tarp cut about 30" square, just big enough for me to sit comfortably indian-style

If the ground is frozen I'll sit on a pad

If I need something more comfortable I'll just string up my hammock and sit or recline in it.

Interesting question, I would like to see what others do.

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-24, 15:06
If the ground is dry I'll just sit on the ground

If the ground is wet I'll use a piece of blue tarp cut about 30" square, just big enough for me to sit comfortably indian-style

If the ground is frozen I'll sit on a pad

If I need something more comfortable I'll just string up my hammock and sit or recline in it.

Interesting question, I would like to see what others do.

I'm actually looking for the directions to make a chair out of wood I find, I've seen pictures but can't really find one off basic searches.

deadeye
2007-04-24, 15:09
I use half a z-rest as part of my sleep system. It's always attached on the outside of the pack, easily accessible. Anytime I want to have a seat or catch a few winks, down goes the z-rest.

Just Jeff
2007-04-24, 18:48
I carry either a sit pad or a torso pad, so I just use those if I need one. Or I use the hammock.

I've made a chair from wood and parachute before. It takes a while, though - much easier to just use the hammock!

dropkick
2007-04-25, 00:35
I carry a plastic lawn bag that I use for covering my pack, sometimes I sit on that and lean against my pack or a tree.

Though if I can find 3 large trees growing close together in a vee shape that's my idea of the perfect seat. Add a branch across the front to drape your knees across, throw some pine needles in for a seat cushion, grab a water bottle and a good book and I'm set.

Just in case you can't picture it I drew a picture.
Once you start looking for trees growing in a formation like this it's surprising how many you'll find.

dropkick
2007-04-25, 01:11
Was thinking maybe I should add the benches I used to build back in the old days. They were quick and easy, just took some rope, 2 trees about the same size fairly close together and either 2 or 3 poles. Both are fairly comfortable.

I very seldom if ever do this anymore though, as the poles usually came from me chopping down a few saplings, and this is no longer acceptable on public lands.

-I also used the 2 pole model for a toilet - I would dig a slit trech under it.

And just had another thought, had a friend who used to carry around a triangle of canvas with pockets sewn into the corners. He would get 3 sticks, tie them together, put the ends in the pockets and have a seat.
I like something to lean against, but he thought it was great.

Iceman
2007-04-25, 01:46
...chopping down a few saplings, ...is no longer acceptable on public lands.

:afraid: Shame on me, but out here we do alot more than knock down a few saplings..... I really need to get out more and see what is going on around this country.......

As for hiking and seats/chairs...since I have younger kids, our hikes are short, overnighters under a couple of miles into the backcountry. Being this short, we have actually packed in a few folding chairs to sit around the campfire with. For longer hikes, I have a folding pad with straps that sort of works. Hate it though....sometimes you go flipping over backwards....looks funny from the other point of view I am sure....

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-25, 09:57
You guys are artists!

dropkick
2007-04-26, 01:36
:afraid: Shame on me, but out here we do alot more than knock down a few saplings..... I really need to get out more and see what is going on around this country.......
Actually when I'm in an area for awhile, out of sight of the "Don't touch or change anything" people and away from the overused areas I still make a few changes to the environment to enhance my comfort.

-I'm one of the responsible types though, I clean up after myself and try to improve the health of the forest when I'm getting my materials.

Cerberus
2007-04-26, 01:50
I've been thinking about carrying a chair type of thing that the Native Americans used to use. It would be a sheet of Silnylon about 18" wide by about 3 feet long. On the top I would sew a nylon web loop like a handle. All you do is find three sticks and lash them together side by side. Open them up like a tripod, and hang the handle of the silnylon on one of the top sticks. The silnylon hangs from the tripod down to the ground giving you a dry place to sit, and the back pulls straight down on the tripod which is the strongest part of the setup. That acts as the back rest. Wouldn't weight very much. Probably have to make the nylon webbing go all the way down the silnylon for strength so it doesn't stretch it out and rip it over time. If you don't have sticks you could still sit on it to keep dry, and many other uses for it. Maybe a doormat for your hammock. So you can step out of your hammoc and not get your socks dirty to put on your shoes. Wrap something in it when not in use to keep stuff dry. I think I just talked myself into making one.

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-26, 11:54
I've been thinking about carrying a chair type of thing that the Native Americans used to use. It would be a sheet of Silnylon about 18" wide by about 3 feet long. On the top I would sew a nylon web loop like a handle. All you do is find three sticks and lash them together side by side. Open them up like a tripod, and hang the handle of the silnylon on one of the top sticks. The silnylon hangs from the tripod down to the ground giving you a dry place to sit, and the back pulls straight down on the tripod which is the strongest part of the setup. That acts as the back rest. Wouldn't weight very much. Probably have to make the nylon webbing go all the way down the silnylon for strength so it doesn't stretch it out and rip it over time. If you don't have sticks you could still sit on it to keep dry, and many other uses for it. Maybe a doormat for your hammock. So you can step out of your hammoc and not get your socks dirty to put on your shoes. Wrap something in it when not in use to keep stuff dry. I think I just talked myself into making one.


Take a picture for us if you do. And you should. Go forth and build!

TeeDee
2007-04-26, 18:37
And just had another thought, had a friend who used to carry around a triangle of canvas with pockets sewn into the corners. He would get 3 sticks, tie them together, put the ends in the pockets and have a seat.
I like something to lean against, but he thought it was great.

dropkick - I have one of those triangular stools. Mine is leather, triangular leather pockets on the corners. The 3 legs are oak, 1" diameter and 24" long. They are joined by three screws welded together and pointing at the three corners of an equilateral triangle. The screws go through holes drilled through the legs at the mid-point and secured with cap nuts. When not in use the legs fold. Bought the original in 1964 while driving around the country in a VW beetle. Somewhere in New Mexico I believe. The leather seat dried and cracked and I didn't trust it anymore, so made a new leather seat last year.

It is actually quite comfortable.

In 1974 I was living in Philly and visited a leather shop. The owner had an identical one for sale. Told him I had one of those and found out he made it. He made them and sold them to various stores around the country. If the legs weren't so darned heavy they would make a great camp stool. I never thought of scrounging for legs on the spot.

Bear
2007-04-27, 08:20
Could you make the legs out of aluminum so that it would be lighter? Just a thought not knowing how the thing looks exactly.

PKH
2007-04-27, 14:00
You can get a 14 oz camp stool from a company called Roll-a-Stool. I don't always carry this thing, but when I do, I appreciate it.

Cheers,

PKH

dropkick
2007-04-28, 01:37
You can get a 14 oz camp stool from a company called Roll-a-Stool. I don't always carry this thing, but when I do, I appreciate it.

Cheers,

PKH

Looks like it was designed the same as the stool I was talking about.
www.camptime.net/roll-a-stool.htm
www.rei.com/product/683909

Turk
2007-04-28, 20:14
Love practicing bushcraft skills.
LNT crazies look away.
Proper caution, concern for the enviro, and choosing when this method is appropriate.... blah blah blah, yada yada. Everyone here knows the drill.
Obviously not suitable for everywhere.
Here is a quick, sturdy and very comfortable camp chair you can make
virtually anywhere with trees.
http://ehko.info/HQ_campchair.JPG
After trying and experimenting with dozens of other designs. I always revert to this style when hiking and kayaking in northern ontario.

Pappyhighlife
2007-04-30, 15:40
I was out with a good hiking buddy two weeks ago and he has a triangular stool invented by the Dutch (I Believe) anyway it has a strong mesh top and is 18 inches long with extendable legs that pop out for a total of 22 inches.

The stool was invented for construction workers on jobs. It will hold 600lbs and it only weighs 22 oz. He wears it on his belt and unhooks it everytime we stop. He bought it from Duluth Trading and paid a grand sum of $75.00 for it.

http://www.duluthtrading.com/home/home.aspx?src=G014017&afid=42&admkt=f5a58f50

Its a large seat and very comfortable. Just a tad to pricey for my budget.
He does swear by it.

PKH
2007-05-01, 08:42
Lord! 600 lbs is a lot of hiker.
That Rool-a-Stool stool is only 14 oz, by the way, but then again I doubt it will support 600 lbs.

Cheers,

PKH

Iceman
2007-05-01, 10:35
Had an epiphany this morning....

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=13479&memberId=12500226&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1

My new camp chair will be a folding portable toilet chair, dual use. Maybe even triple use..... :ahhhhh: Chair, valuables vault, and emergency "cannot wait to dig a hole" chair.:biggrin:

sailingsoul
2007-05-01, 23:48
Wonderful Iceman. A true chair for the camper who is just full of it. Bound to have a bunch of takers around here. Hire more operators now, before the rush.

To heavy you say??? It's got a "catch bag",,,, bio-degradeable I'm sure. Just leave the shovle at home o. ( ooops! a turrets slip) SS:captain:


ps Just how do you lift the seat????? If you just need to wee.

oldsoldier
2007-05-03, 08:38
I usually just use my 5th point on contact :)

Iceman
2007-05-03, 08:41
...A true chair for the camper who is just full of it.. ........:biggrin:

Take-a-knee
2007-05-03, 09:45
Old Soldier I believe that would be your fourth point-of-contact if you are refering to your butt. That is if I remember what I used to put out in airborne refresher, it has been a while.

dropkick
2007-05-04, 02:37
Anyone read "All Quiet On The Western Front"?
It's a story about WWI from the point of view of a German soldier on the line.
Anyway Iceman's new seat reminded me of it.
The man who wrote the book tells of how he and his fellow soldiers all got a cronic case of diarriah.
To deal with this (it was during a lull in the fighting) they all built seats like you might find in an outhouse and would sit on them in groups and play cards. When the area they were playing in got to smelly they would just pick up their seats and move to a new area.

Take-a-knee
2007-05-04, 08:15
Dropkick, I read "All Quiet". The diarrhea episode speaks to the poor sanitation that most soldiers throughout history have had to deal with. If you want to read a completely different take on WWI read "A Rifleman Went to War" by Maj. Herbert McBride. He was an American National Guard officer who enlisted in the Canadian Army to get "over there" as fast as possible. I believe the NRA Bookshelf has it.

TeeDee
2007-05-06, 17:19
If you want a really light chair ? for the backpacking, try this one:

http://www.nadachair.com/index.html

I imagine it is about the lightest I have read about - how much can a little fabric and some straps weigh? Of course that pad you carry is probably lighter as a chair since you are carrying it anyway.

Gun Plumber
2007-05-07, 20:11
When My daughter was in Brownies, I was introduced to the Idea of the "Sit-a-pon" Just an ass sized piece of closed cell foam edged with gun tape. I found this a handy way to keep a cushy tushy and being closer to the ground than the average 1, 2 or 3 legged camp stool gives one a shorter fall after too much pusser rum. I recently replaced mine with a round self inflating one with some soccer logo onit that I found at a flea market.

GuffAbbott
2007-05-09, 19:27
I use this:

http://www.slinglight.com/information.htm

It weighs barely more than a can of beer :beerglass , and it fits perfectly in my Moonbow Gearskin (thank you Sgt Rock for that terrific suggestion).

It is extremely comfortable -- especially with the headrest -- and it puts me down at an easy level for cooking.

My wife got it for me for Christmas, and it was my favorite gift, by far.

It was a bit costly, but worth every penny.

:biggrin: