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View Full Version : So what can't you kill and eat?



Rhino-lfl
2007-04-25, 15:34
I've never gone for much more then fishing, deer, some foul and the wabbit. My friend borrowed some of my snares because he said he has a muskrat and some skunk under his house and wants to get them. He said after he catches them, he's gonna eat'em. But I've heard that some animals you just can't eat, and I would think that skunk and muskrat would be one of them. I also heard that possum is riddled with parasites and you don't want to eat that either. I've had squirrel but never chipmunk, nor raccoon or crow, I was also told that some wild geese taste like poop.

Do you guys know any North American animals or foul like this that you can't eat, or can you pretty much eat anything?

Jim Henderson
2007-04-25, 17:31
Yeah some taste good some don't.

I never heard of eating skunk. I think muskrat is supposed to have an off taste. I have heard Possum is edible and has been transported across the US by possum gourmets so now they live in places that never had them.

There are some waterfowl that taste foul due to what they eat. I have heard that the birds that eat a lot of fish are nasty. Never heard of anyone eating any of the big cats or coyotes/wolves.

I am not a wild game eater. Closest I come is a trip to a sushi bar or some fried shrimp heads. So can't say from personal experience what the above animals taste like.

Jim Henderson

Red Gauntlet
2007-04-25, 18:48
Well, I've eaten countless geese and never had an off 'un. Same can't be said for the ducks that eat fish, but the dabblers are always good, to me anyhows.
Tho' I haven't eaten possum, surely they are eaten with relish by some (now don't ask for the possum relish recipe:biggrin: ). As for parasites, that's what cooking's for.
I think you could eat purt' near any mammal, but cleaning some could be tricky; the skunk, for example....

Mutinousdoug
2007-04-26, 01:07
On this theme; I wonder why nobody eats jack rabbits? Anybody? Or pidgeons ( ugh!). that survivor guy eats rats and mice whole. That's got to be nasty.
I don't care for ducks, at least any I've tasted but I never ate a bad goose.
I understand cougar is good eating but must be cooked with the same care as bear (or feral pig?).
The first guy to eat an oyster had to have been pretty hungry, but I could eat a half peck of fresh, raw Chesapeake oysters right now!

dropkick
2007-04-26, 01:47
Never ate possum or skunk but water rat is pretty good.
Never had a bad goose, duck is a little greasy for me but good.
Mountain lion is supposed to be the best eating there is (according to Jim Bridger, Jim Bowie, and a few others). As I haven't tried it yet I can't say if they were telling the truth or not.
-I never turn down a new type of food -the first time.

dropkick
2007-04-26, 02:01
There was a disease you had to watch out for when hunting jack rabbit (tuleramia?) called rabbit fever. You got it from the fleas the rabbit carried.
After you killed the rabbit the fleas would leave and try for any animal nearby - that usually included the hunter.
Rabbit hunting fell out of favor because of this.

Lots of people eat pidgeon they just call it dove.
Castles used to have inside rooms with open roofs and lots of little cubby holes. These were to encourage pidgeons to live there. They were mainly for emergency food but occasionally they would grab a few for a normal dinner.

Mutinousdoug
2007-04-26, 12:00
Bunny rabbits (cottontails) carry tularemia as well and while it is spread by fleas and ticks, it can also be passed via body fluids to any cuts or sores on your hands. Rabbit bones are easily broken and can be a method for injecting the desease into the hunter. Supposedly you wait for the first frost of the fall to kill off the weak ones and look for white spots on the liver of your bunnies to diagnose the disease. Maybe jacks are big enough that the 1st frost thing doesn't work reliably on them?
Tularemia is described as a plague-like disease in that it is an easily treated bacteria but after a certain stage of infection it is not survivable (like rabies).
How about bugs? I've eaten a couple of grasshoppers on a dare; they were pretty crunchy but mild flavored. 2 or 3 tomato hornworms would be a meal, I suppose (doubt I could choke down even a small one).

Red Gauntlet
2007-04-26, 15:16
I've eaten fried grasshoppers in Mexico; "chapulines" they're called and or snacked on like popcorn in Southern Mexico, in Oaxaca. Didn't care for 'em. Crunchy, but sort of vinegary....

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-26, 16:40
... I've eaten a couple of grasshoppers on a dare; they were pretty crunchy but mild flavored. 2 or 3 tomato hornworms would be a meal, I suppose (doubt I could choke down even a small one).

Eat my earthworm hamburgers lol.

Frolicking Dino
2007-04-27, 09:59
Do you guys know any North American animals or foul like this that you can't eat, or can you pretty much eat anything?Dinos are foul tasting, tough, and eating them will give you more diseases than I can mention.
::: dino hovers about to see if crowd is buying this :willy: :::

The HotDog
2007-04-27, 10:49
You know, I just happen to have a link to some recipes for raccoon, muskrat and skunk. http://www.coon-n-crockett.org/cookbook.htm

GGS
2007-04-27, 11:31
I found a recipe for baked skunk:

BAKED SKUNK

1 fat skunk
2 lbs. salt
1 flat board
4 nails

Carefully clean and prepare fat skunk. Soak in salt water for 3 days. Select a flat board of green oak, less than 1 inch thick. Carefully stretch skunk on board and nail down legs. Place skunk on board in preheated oven at 375 degrees for 1 1/2 hours. After cooking time is up, take skunk and board out of oven. Carefully take nails out of board. Cautiously take the skunk off the board and then eat the board.

dropkick
2007-04-28, 01:27
I used to have a cookbook from the 1800's (it was stolen from me).
It had recipes for all kinds of animals - gopher, badger, muskrat, sparrows, starlings, snake, beaver, etc.
Don't remember skunk or dinosaur though???

Thudley
2007-04-28, 12:36
Going through survival school in the military, we had to eat grubs, worms, insects, snake, and snared birds. I managed to choke down just enough to get a passing grade. Most of these things were way too gross for this city kid.

I've read that you can eat any mammal, but I'd think that it may be a toss-up for just who gets to be dinner if you're after bears or mountain lions.

Oh...Dino...I would image that skinning (& cleaning) one of those would have been a big chore for the whole tribe.

sailingsoul
2007-04-28, 18:44
... we had to eat grubs, worms, insects, snake, and snared birds. I managed to choke down just enough to get a passing grade. Most of these things were way too gross for this city kid.
You needed Vodka, as a chaser. I heard the some Russians found and cooked a Siberian Woolly Manmoth, they dugg up from the permafrost. Don't know how they cooked it. They had Vodka and said it was pretty good! If the Russian find a Dinosaur,,,,,, well! , that's one cookout I'd love to attend. SS:captain:

Mutinousdoug
2007-04-28, 19:12
You needed Vodka, as a chaser. I heard the some Russians found and cooked a Siberian Woolly Manmoth, they dugg up from the permafrost. Don't know how they cooked it. They had Vodka and said it was pretty good! If the Russian find a Dinosaur,,,,,, well! , that's one cookout I'd love to attend. SS:captain:

Woolly mammoth and dinosaurs are not in the same ballpark for age. 5-10,000 yrs for tha Mammoth and 65 million for the dinos. Dinos GOT to suffer from freezer burn. Not to mention, none of the ice field/glaciers on earth are more than about 400,000 years old. Nasty...

dropkick
2007-04-28, 23:28
I've read several times that frozen mammoth is supposed to taste good.
Natives have been eating them when found for generations.
Supposedly there is no freezer burn and the meat tastes fresh. Haven't had a chance to try it though.
-Don't know how that works - mammoth sure wouldn't stay fresh that long in my freezer.

Most bugs and insects are good and good for you. I've eaten many different types either prepared, or unprepared, in different ways. Most of them I liked the taste of - not enough to add to my normal menu, but plenty good in a pinch.
- My first was raw ants in Boyscouts. We had a survival guy showing us tricks and things you should carry. Used a safety razor to chop the heads off and invited those with the stomach to try them (he killed his own with his teeth).
I was one of the few who tried them and the only one who also tried killing them with his teeth. I must be odd, as I still don't understand why the other kids had a problem with this.

sailingsoul
2007-04-28, 23:29
Nasty?? Nah! Just abit crunchy.

Frolicking Dino
2007-04-29, 06:40
"If the Russian find a Dinosaur,,,,,, well! , that's one cookout I'd love to attend."
:eating: :afraid: :vroam:

Rosaleen
2007-04-29, 09:25
[QUOTE=Thudley;18794]Going through survival school in the military, we had to eat grubs, worms, insects, snake, and snared birds. I managed to choke down just enough to get a passing grade. Most of these things were way too gross for this city kid.

Recently I was hiking with a friend who happens to have a Masters in Entymology. (I'm not even sure of the spelling...) I do not recall how the subject came up, but he told me he was hiking in a group in some rain forest type area and they spotted tubes built by above ground termites. He commented to the guide that the North American termites he deals with are subterrainian and taste somewhat like mushrooms. The guide after hesitating said these termites taste more like carrots. My friend broke open a tube and ate some termites. He says they DO taste ilke carrots. I told him I'd take his word for it... As I've noted in other posts, I haven't been hungry enough to try intentionally eating bugs, yet.

That said, crayfish are pretty good, boiled and served like lobsters, though. Boil some thistle stems (peel first) and/or young cattail or milkweed pods. I've served these to my kids (now grown). I haven't figured out a backwoods butter substitute, yet. It was fun to gather these and have them for supper after a naturalist's presentation about wild foods. I doubt the atmosphere was anything like the survival training you guys are writing about...

Rosaleen

Take-a-knee
2007-04-29, 10:57
What I was taught in SERE School was any critter you catch could usually be eaten but if you did so without thoroughly cooking it (usually by boiling) you would most likely make yourself sick. I'm pretty sure that is what has been taught in all military survival schools for quite some time. One's bacterial normal flora in the intestinal lumen exist within a fairly narrow parameter, you get outside that too far and you'll start losing water (diarrhea).

Spice1
2007-04-29, 15:41
I got to eat the bugs in the military too. I freaked out my fiance a few years ago by popping a grub in my mouth. It's not candy, but it never grossed me out too much. Got to eat raw snake once, and I would say that was the crowning moment of gross, but I was in an acute state of hunger. My buddy handed me half, and seeing him dig in, I did the same. blech. But god it felt good to chew.

One thing no one has mentioned in this thread; Never eat a carnivore's liver. The build up of vitamin A can be lethal. Doubt any of you would try it, but I do know it is one for the DON'T EAT THAT category.

Take-a-knee, I volunteered for every detail and school in the army, and when working at the Embassy, was presented the opportunity to go to SERE school. It was the ONLY school I ever turned down. Was it as bad as everyone says?

GGS
2007-04-29, 18:36
One thing no one has mentioned in this thread; Never eat a carnivore's liver. The build up of vitamin A can be lethal.

Long ago I heard SOMETHING to the effect of this: Eating Vitamin A tablets _equivalent_ to a carnivore's liver can kill you. Eating equivalent levels of any vitamin A in its natural form cannot kill you. Reasoning: When eaten in its raw acidic form (vitamin tablets) Vitamin A cannot be rejected by your body thus it can build to toxic levels. When eaten in a natural form Vitamin A is surrounded by complex molecules that allows your body to choose when it's had enough and flush the excess from the body.

Is anyone a vitamin expert who can lay credence to this or dispute it?

-GGS

Take-a-knee
2007-04-29, 23:58
Spice 1, I'm not the best person to say how bad SERE school was 'cause I never made it to camp slappy, they separated my shoulder doing PCT (pressure point control techniques) at the end of the first week. In other words, they disabled me before they usually start disabling people. SERE, Ranger School, SFAS, and CAG Selection are all pretty rugged, increasingly so in the order listed. A lot of combat arms guys look pretty old by retirement, there is a reason for that.

As for liver and vitamin A, that is a lipid soluble vitamin (A,D,E & K) so enough fat has to be consumed along with it for the vitamin to be absorbed. Bear liver is high in Vit A and high in fat, so if you kill a bear and eat two pounds of liver that might be a problem. I'm guessing a 3-4oz serving wouldn't be harmful, but I've not researched that.

KLeth
2007-04-30, 02:24
There are serveral reasons to not eat carnivore liver.
One is that being on top of the foodchain, they accumulate a high amount of toxins and mercury in the liver.
The second is Trichinosis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichinosis)/Trichina (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichina) which goes for all carnivore meat (including pigs) if not cooked thoroughly. To get the vitamins from meat, it has to be raw since cooking breaks down most of them. Eskimos eats raw liver from game to get vitamins, but their bodies are accustomed to the high concentrations of vitamins.

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-30, 12:37
I was under the impression that eating just a mouthful of a polar bears liver would kill you, but other carnivores you could eat the liver (again, probably wouldn't want to eat 2 lbs of it) as long as it was properly cooked. But polar bear is always a no no.

Streamweaver
2007-04-30, 12:40
One animal you should'nt eat even in a survival situation is a box turtle! Their meat itself is not toxic but they eat several species of mushrooms that are fatal to humans. The toxins dont hurt the turtle but they build up in their flesh(much like a poison dart frog,its the insects they eat that makes them toxic) and can kill you if eaten.

Rhino-lfl
2007-04-30, 12:55
Got it, rules for survival:
1. Donít eat box turtles, they are stoners and you can get a fatal contact high.
2. Donít eat polar bear livers. Just trying to get one can be tough, how bad would it be to kill a polar bear with your bare hands, skin it with your teeth, then eat it and die. Sucky.
3. Donít eat porcupines, they poo and pee on themselves.
4. Cook your food thoroughly, even eyeballs.
5. Donít eat freezer burned animals that have been buried under glaciers for 400,000 years, they are bound to be yucky.
6. Donít eat squirrel brains, itíll fuck you up.
7. Donít pet dead rabbits, they have fleas and shit that will fuck you up. If you kill one, just throw boiling water on it from 15ft away and then set the area around it on fire, eat whatís left.
8. Eating bugs is better than eating your own poop if youíre hungry.
9. Vodka makes everything edible.
10. Just stick close to a Stop & Shop and youíll be better off than trying to stuff the crap weíve been talking about in this post down you face hole.

Spice1
2007-04-30, 17:34
Rhino, that should be a t-shirt.

Especially;

2. Donít eat polar bear livers. Just trying to get one can be tough, how bad would it be to kill a polar bear with your bare hands, skin it with your teeth, then eat it and die. Sucky.

Great visual image.

oldsoldier
2007-04-30, 19:34
I was taught also that bugs, besides harboring parasites that are nasty ot us, also some (grasshoppers, for instance), have those horrid barbs, that can get stuck in the throat.
The best way I've found to roast ants (actually termites) was to heat a flat rock, in a fire, then shake a nest onto the hot rock, kinda like a griddle. Then, ground em up. IIRC, they had a nut flavor (I was at Ft. Lewis when we did this).
not too filling on its own, but, mix with water, and get a nice pasty consistency, and pretend its pate or something :)

JAK
2007-04-30, 21:02
I have read that the time of year makes a real difference with muskrat, and you always have to be careful around scent glands on animals that have them. As far as I know you can always eat them though. Of course no calories are worth it if you end up getting sick, but sometimes I imagine you gotta take your chances. A little practice now and then makes sense. :toilet:
Of course just about anything might make sense after enough vodka.

john pickett
2007-05-01, 15:24
"Is anyone a vitamin expert who can lay credence to this or dispute it?"

I'm no vitamin or other topic expert, just a former Corpsman, respiratory therapist and current clinical perfusionist, but I have read some of early arctic explorers who ate the liver from some animal they had killed. Don't recall now if it was a seal or bear. The men developed an " exfoliative dermatitis ". In laymans' terms, their skin came off in big strips. I'll stick with calves liver.
John Pickett

Rhino-lfl
2007-05-01, 16:38
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypervitaminosis_A

SGT Rock
2007-05-01, 18:24
Got it, rules for survival:
1. Donít eat box turtles, they are stoners and you can get a fatal contact high.
2. Donít eat polar bear livers. Just trying to get one can be tough, how bad would it be to kill a polar bear with your bare hands, skin it with your teeth, then eat it and die. Sucky.
3. Donít eat porcupines, they poo and pee on themselves.
4. Cook your food thoroughly, even eyeballs.
5. Donít eat freezer burned animals that have been buried under glaciers for 400,000 years, they are bound to be yucky.
6. Donít eat squirrel brains, itíll fuck you up.
7. Donít pet dead rabbits, they have fleas and shit that will fuck you up. If you kill one, just throw boiling water on it from 15ft away and then set the area around it on fire, eat whatís left.
8. Eating bugs is better than eating your own poop if youíre hungry.
9. Vodka makes everything edible.
10. Just stick close to a Stop & Shop and youíll be better off than trying to stuff the crap weíve been talking about in this post down you face hole.
Can I quote you on that LOL ;)

Woods Walker
2007-05-02, 00:39
I like trout. The bugs and worms are for bait rather than eating.

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n220/Daytraderwon/100_5144.jpg

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n220/Daytraderwon/brown1.jpg

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n220/Daytraderwon/deadbrown-1.jpg

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n220/Daytraderwon/troutfry-1.jpg

Thudley
2007-05-02, 12:38
Rhino,

Still laughing at your post. I guess I'll stick to your #10.

By the way...I have an acute sense of smell. I can zero in on a pizza shop from 10 miles out. :biggrin:

Amigi
2007-05-02, 18:46
Nothing sweeter on earth than a sugar ant. There was a beetle in Colombia that the native Indians would cook and eat the thorax innards. Smelled good, looked like mashed yam, and I have no idea how it tasted.
In Orlando here, there is a restaurant called the Mountain Grill. The entire menu is nothing but exotic foods: Beefalo, mountain lion ( I think its another nonendangered cat though ), camel, weird savannah veggies, etc. They even took alligator off the menu since its now becoming rather popular with the hunting restrictions mostly lifted.
I am almost positive than humans can consume any mammal and nearly every reptile. I'm sure lots of us have had snake. Rattlesnake is the bomb.