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View Full Version : What's your most essential gear?



dropkick
2007-06-14, 01:29
Okay BDawg asked what's your favorite piece of gear, I'm asking what you think is the most important piece.

As with the other thread I think we should limit the amount of gear you can list (so we don't get shopping lists) BDawg limited it to two items, but I'm more generous so I'll only ask you to limit it to three item.:aetsch: Okay five, but they should be important.

-Connected items (i.e. everything in a med kit) can count as one item.

Jim Henderson
2007-06-14, 12:42
Your question is almost identical to the other... "What do you never leave home without?"...

The other guys subject heading said favorite, but the question was almost identical to yours.

Answers would probably be the same. But it gives us a chance to add to our list.

Once you get past the usual "must have to survive" type stuff including the meat between your ears, I would say my most essential gear after what I must take with me is...

My stove and messkit. Half the reason I go gallumphing thru the woods is so I can eat when I get there.

Usually the stove is my rust trusty Optimus 8R I boughtr back in 68 when I was 12 and saved up the $12 in allowance I needed.

My messkit is an old aluminum nesting pot set I bought back in the mid 70s and it has gone on almost every overnighter I have ever taken. It includes a worthless teflon coated pan and my Swiss made nesting utensil set and a small pot and lid from a boyscout kit for my traditional before bed rice and chili.

Also important is my Gerry down sleeping bag which has seen me thru lots of outings since the 70s. Surpirsed it hasn't worn out. All my synthetic bags eventually wear out. None of my down bags have worn out.

Also almost always have a camera of some sort, gotta keep the memories.

Also like to have a portable lantern so I can read. Used to be my Campingaz GT Globetrotter, but fuel is rare now so I use my Coleman Expedition lantern or if I want a lot of light a Campingaz lantern using the bigger easier to find cartridges.

Other than that And the essentials, I can get by in the woods for a day or two with just this. The rest of the gear I lug along is for creature comforts and is not important other than to keep the creature comfy.

Jim Henderson

deadeye
2007-06-14, 12:54
Also important is my Gerry down sleeping bag which has seen me thru lots of outings since the 70s. Surpirsed it hasn't worn out. All my synthetic bags eventually wear out. None of my down bags have worn out.

Gerry made top-quality stuff. I still have my Gerry bag from 1969, can't count how many nights I've slept in it. Rated for 20 degrees, but I've used it comfortably at -20. Same performance from my Gerry stove and tent. The tent floor finally disentegrated after 30+ years of use. We'll see if any of the stuff I've bought over the past few years will be here in 2035.

Frolicking Dino
2007-06-14, 15:14
My tarp is my most important and multi-use peice of gear.

JAK
2007-06-14, 16:02
Hmmm. Not counting clothes, I would say whatever kit I bring for making fire. Usually a couple of lighters and a bunch of matches. Working on a flint and steel kit. If I can make fire I can make tea, and other stuff also, but mostly when I have forgotten matches I am miserable because I can't make tea. I've never run out, but I have forgotten them a few times on day trips. Frustrating. Other things that come to mind as being most essential would be a blue foam pad, and rain poncho/tarp. I guess we have to assume we have something on our feet when we leave home. We want to make sure they don't break though, whatever they are. A knife is very handy also, as is cordage, but I have often gone without those without too much difficulty or frustration. A candle lantern is nice to have also. I would rather forget a lot of things before I forget some sort of night light. You can always improvise though, with birch bark and stuff. Fire and adequate clothing is probably most essential to me, though many people say they can do without fire. Perhaps I'm just a pyro.

oops56
2007-06-14, 17:04
Jak sounds to me if you forget your matches and candle your will be up s--- creak with no paddle.:birthday:

CoyoteWhips
2007-06-14, 18:17
I was once asked, if I were stranded on a island and could take one book, what would it be? I figured any book would be fine, as long as it was big and had soft, absorbent pages.

I don't carry an ax. When I'm gathering sticks for a small stove fire, I like to use a good pair of pruning clippers.

pure_mahem
2007-06-14, 21:45
Five items hmmmmm.......

Kits count as one item...........

1.Taurus 111 .40S&W w/ 2 spare clips (Security & Food)
2.Ferrocerium rod, vaseline cotton balls, and a Bic (fire kit)
3.My 19" Kukri w/ 550 cord Handle (Security, Hatchet and do all Knife)
4.Water cantine w/ purification tablets This has a cup and stove stored in it
5.Roll of TP

Those are the necessities

Worse comes to worse the pistol gets you everything else, lol!

Iceman
2007-06-15, 00:35
Here we go...

Condoms, whiskey, t.p., matches, and a pistol. I can shoot, cook, crap, drink and maybe get lucky.... :biggrin: What more does a guy want?.......


In reality.... I leave the condoms at home and instead bring a headlamp so I can see what to shoot, cook, crap on, drink etc.....

Turk
2007-06-15, 18:07
hehehe.. awesome Iceman. Well said:adore:
I am definately on that team.

Fire

Tomahawk

Booze/narcotics

Everything else becomes a minor inconvenience after that.
Assuming you are uninjured, time and knowledge/bushcraft can make up
for most things you could want for.

Oh... I was allowed 5. Well there is just one more thing I would have to put in. Its REALLY nice to have a container
for boiling water. Thats pretty major. So, I guess I would throw in a nice 1.1litre titanium deep pot, with pouring spout,
tight fitting lid and bail handle. Rated in importance it probablly comes second only to fire.

BDawg
2007-06-15, 18:19
After my favorite peice of gear, i would say my most essential would be:

Bells and pepper spray, to hurl back at the bears when im runnin.

After that I like Turks list.

dropkick
2007-06-16, 23:14
After my favorite peice of gear, i would say my most essential would be:

Bells and pepper spray, to hurl back at the bears when im runnin.

After that I like Turks list.
I never found throwing bells and pepper spray at the bears (while running) to be very effective. That's why in grizzly country you should always bring a slower running hiker along with you.

Bear
2007-06-17, 01:53
I never found throwing bells and pepper spray at the bears (while running) to be very effective. That's why in grizzly country you should always bring a slower running hiker along with you.

Or one who is down with his back.:aetsch:

Just kidding Dropkick, I have pulled a muscle in my back before and know how it feels. Hope you get better soon. Until then, pray you don't sneeze!!!

BDawg
2007-06-18, 12:00
I never found throwing bells and pepper spray at the bears (while running) to be very effective. That's why in grizzly country you should always bring a slower running hiker along with you.


Good idea, Is there a protocal for selecting the hiker in question, or best practices for such a selection? does my Ex count?

And yeah spraying your pepper spray wildly in the air while running from bear works, at least it did for that silly bastard i saw last summer in CA, his bells deffinatly didnt work.

JAK
2007-06-18, 15:16
A .22 should be enough to slow down a faster runner.

TeeDee
2007-06-18, 21:33
Good idea, Is there a protocal for selecting the hiker in question, or best practices for such a selection? does my Ex count?

Bumper sticker:

I still miss my Ex,

But my aim is getting better.