PDA

View Full Version : washing dishes/utensils in bc



wascally
2007-10-17, 19:41
Hello all. First time poster here.

I've been backpacking for maybe 5 years or so...hiking since I was a kid. I pride myself on figuring most problems out on my own...but I've come to one I'd like some feedback on.

washing eating utensils...and I guess cookware/bowls/plates as well; even though I mostly eat out of a bag to keep the cleaning to a minimum.

what methods do you use? how do you do it?

I imagine maybe an ultra-lightweight camp-sink, using Campsuds or another biodegradable soap with as little water as possible is ideal.

my concern is this. hiking in areas of severe drought...where streams and springs are dry; camping in primitive campsites and having to drink, cook, and clean with the water you carry in on your back. I get done eating, and my spork or foon is completely coated in sticky mess, that takes more than licking to get off. I don't want to place items like this back into the pack before I hike out obviously.

Is there a method to use in this situation I'm overlooking...? Would having anti-bacterial wipes be a good idea for this?

I'd definitely like to know what the group has to say on this.

Thanks in advance;

-W

SGT Rock
2007-10-17, 19:51
I normally rinse the bowl and drink the water to avoid the waste. If it still needs cleaning I put a small dash of Dr Bronners in with some water and use leaves or pine straw to scrub the pot.

Turk
2007-10-17, 20:22
that gave me a full body shiver Rock.

Damn ....


thats hardcore!

You are setting the bar of UL conservative sanitation mighty high indeed. bravo.

Turk
2007-10-17, 20:30
Here are some more ideas for consideration..

Clean sand. I personally like something a bit abrasive. Easy to find with
almost any water source. I generally wade into fast moving water and
try and dig down a good ways to avoid general river bottom muck that could
contain god knows what. Eroding river banks are good if you don't want to
get wet. I would obviously never suggest this in stagnant water or from
ponds and swamps.
Old man's beard. Wad it up on a stick almost like cotton candy and you can
scrub out pretty much anything. Works like a toilet brush. And of course its
great fire starter, so you can just burn it to leave no trace .. or remove
food particles from your site in bear country.

Reindeer moss is good unless the area has been in sustained drought and
it gets all crusty. But the fresh stuff is a great sponge/ cleaner.

In spring and summer the back side of ferns make great towels for drying.
All those little hairs are soft and wick up moisture really well.

I can think of several others but I am not up to par with exactly what kind
of vegetation you are certain to have out there in whatever part of BC you
are from. Those at least should be the most common and easy to find.

deadeye
2007-10-18, 09:47
I normally rinse the bowl and drink the water to avoid the waste. If it still needs cleaning I put a small dash of Dr Bronners in with some water and use leaves or pine straw to scrub the pot.

Same method for me. Everything bigger than microscopic gets washed away, and the pot and spoon get sanitized with boiling water at the next meal or the next cup of coffee.

Gray Blazer
2007-10-18, 15:25
Hello all.

Is there a method to use in this situation I'm overlooking...? Would having anti-bacterial wipes be a good idea for this?

-W

I use alcohol wipes. When I'm backpacking I basically use one large coffee cup for cooking my ramen or whatever and a plastic spoon from Wendy's/whatever (I bring 2 in case one breaks). I wipe everything off with the alcohol wipes that I pack pack out again. Recommended to me by my wife, a super clean freak, and I haven't gotten sick yet. You can use the alcohol wipes to clean off your body, also (or at least your pits and privates). Good way to get rid of that hiker funk when there is limited water available.

SGT Rock
2007-10-18, 15:31
that gave me a full body shiver Rock.

Damn ....


thats hardcore!

You are setting the bar of UL conservative sanitation mighty high indeed. bravo.
Well look at it this way:

I'm eating grits. At the end of my meal grits are stuck in the bowl. So add water and finish the meal - just as a drink instead of grits. It isn't like I am drinking dirty water or eating spoiled food.

Replace grits with beans, rice, pasta, or whatever. It is economy of use for food and water.

GGS
2007-10-18, 15:34
I normally rinse the bowl and drink the water to avoid the waste. If it still needs cleaning I put a small dash of Dr Bronners in with some water and use leaves or pine straw to scrub the pot.

Ew, sounds kinda gross! Nor am I fond of the sand/dirt/moss ideas.

Although what I do others may consider gross as well.

I let the dog lick the dishes clean, then wipe with a moist washcloth. For stubborn food particles I carry one of those green fiberglass scrub pads cut into a 2" sqare.

That's the nice thing about hiking with a dog. Anything with a residual food odor will be consumed by HER before the varmints catch wind of it.

Lone Wolf
2007-10-18, 15:49
rinse my pot with cold water and 2 fingers, toss then rinse again

fin24000
2007-10-18, 16:17
Well when I'm not eating out of a bag then I will us my finger to clean the rest out maybe abit of water if I did something stupid like eat oatmeal out of a pot and not a bag. Other then that don't waste food....

Bear
2007-10-18, 18:38
You are right GGS, I am one that says YUK!!!!!!! The dogs bowl is the dogs bowl and my bowl is my bowl and we DON"T share! If I ever run in to you hiking remind me not to eat after you (or the dog).:ahhhhh:

fin24000
2007-10-18, 19:43
lol you should never waste good food especially while on the trail.... why not just drink the rest?, is it not good anymore?....

sailingsoul
2007-10-18, 21:14
I don't see anything yucky w/ Rocks way. However, I just love it when I see a dog owner pucker there lips and lets there dog give them a big French kiss. OH Baby! Has anyone heard of Helicobacter Pylori ? Helicobacter species have been isolated from the stomachs of dogs, cats, ferrets, pigs, monkeys and cheetahs, birds, mice, chickens. I guess it should also read humans, w/ulcers! Doctors no longer say ulcers are caused by to much worrying and treat them with antibiotics vs malox.
http://www.drmirkin.com/morehealth/G123.htm
Also there is a great medical Search Engine at this site, FYI. SS:captain:


PS Anyone with arthritis would find the latest treatment available that some doctors don't prescribe because they don't know.

MrSparex
2007-10-18, 21:28
Good GRIEF Charlie Brown!!!

deadeye
2007-10-19, 09:38
Helicopterbacteria py-whati? Don't know much about biology, but I do know that the last thing that dog was lickin' don't belong near my lips - or my pots.puke:

Nightwalker
2007-10-19, 20:49
I usually use sand and creek water for the pot. After all, you're going to boil it before you use it again!

wascally
2007-10-20, 14:33
I appreciate all the replies...thanx mucho. some of you guys keep referring to water; in the context of wading... or using creek water and sand. In my post I posted about serious concern in the case of a drought-stricken dry trail; meaning no extra water laying around the campsite to use for cleaning dishes, mugs, pots...and the like.

I like the idea of using alchohol wipes; not too much added weight, and you can carry a few without adding too many ounces in case the water situation is super dry. All the other methods I'm reading here, require the use of more water to get the stuff clean.

Thanks again for all the replies. :)

-W

fin24000
2007-10-20, 15:31
well if you are only cooking dinner then you could just wipe it out with your finger (and eat it) and then throw it in your bag as you will be cooking out any germs before next use.... It would just be a pain once you get home to get it real clean again.

Hog On Ice
2007-10-20, 18:21
for low water use cleanup nothing beats freezer bag cooking - when done eating just zip up the bag and put it in the trash or burn it - the pot is only used for boiling water

wrt to the spoon I just lick it off and then give it a wipe with a bandanna that I keep just for wiping out the pot and spoon

GGS
2007-10-21, 17:18
You are right GGS, I am one that says YUK!!!!!!! The dogs bowl is the dogs bowl and my bowl is my bowl and we DON"T share! If I ever run in to you hiking remind me not to eat after you (or the dog).:ahhhhh:

(Chuckle) It has the effect that no one wants to share my backpacking dishes or the food I cook... GGS: "Ya these cook up pretty good, wanna try one?" Hiking partner: "Um, no thanks"

Actually if you think about it most methods suggested here are similar in function. The first round of cleaning (stream sand, pine needles, dog) cleans off macro food particles but leaves or may introduce unwanted microorganisms. The second round of cleaning is when the pot is heated to cook the next meal which kills any microorganisms left.

Sgt Rock's method of drinking your own dishwater would probably introduce the least microorganisms as long as you don't resort to any of the pot scrubbing methods above

Gray Blazer's method of cleaning up with an alcohol wipe is probably the most sterile technique suggested.

I guess it all depends on what does/doesn't gross you out. Probably the most, um, interesting use of a cooking pot came from a team hiking to the north pole. Following the "dual use" philosophy one member would use his cooking pot as a toilet, first lining it with a plastic bag. Not surprisingly his partner was none too fond of that adaptation of their cookware...

pure_mahem
2007-10-21, 21:30
...the visions....get out of my head....the visions...."come on already I'm hungry"....GRRRUNNNNT....."come on I'm starvin already"........"are you done yet?"..........."when's dinner gonna be ready"......."UMMMMM, Never mind".....LMFAO!!!!

jldraper
2007-11-06, 23:10
As tasteless as it is, I pour some boiling water into my bowl, slosh it around and get the big pieces dislodged and then drink it. It is easy (or not so easy depending on your perspective) to get more hot fluids into your system if you're cold and get your bowl clean at the same time. I'm a novice a long-distance hiking but it doesn't seem to use up too much additonal fuel.
Ciao for now.
jldraper

Iceman
2007-11-10, 10:16
Just got back from a 8 day trip. Rinsed my steel bowl with extra water after each use. Then next meal time, I heated a tiny bit of water to boiling in bowl, sloshed around to kill any clingons, and then went to boil my next meal. If I get anything resembling a "salad shooter" in the next few days, I will let you know.... :biggrin: