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CoyoteWhips
2007-10-24, 20:50
I've been looking at cabin tents. If I went car camping here in New England, I'd want a big comfy tent; maybe one with could set up with a small wood stove. It would have to stand up to getting a foot or two of snow dumped on it. I haven't seen anything that really stands out.

Mutinousdoug
2007-10-24, 23:46
No canvas tent you can fit in your SUV will withstand 2 ft of snow in overnight. A practical remedy is one of those blue plastic tarps thrown over the ridge of the tent to shed snow. I have a 10x14 with galvanized, tubular frame and stove jack that makes a good hunting tent for 4 guys, max. Stove is plenty nice when snow is falling. Mine was locally sewn but of pretty standard design: peak vents, sod cloth, Fastex buckles. I can put it up by myself when it's dry but the fabric itself weighs about 80 lbs when dry.

Iceman
2007-10-25, 09:57
I winter camp in a Eureka Equinox, it is free standing, sheds snow, and has a high enough ceiling to stand up in. I also have spent two weeks a year in this tent as a hunting tent and have not ruined it yet. Very good quality. I have wondered about a stove hookup, but may not be enough room.....floor size is only 87 square feet.

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=21420620&memberId=12500226&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1

SGT Rock
2007-10-25, 11:08
The only tents I have any experience getting that much snow in were canvas Army tents - and they don't do so good. But you can put a stove in them.

Take-a-knee
2007-10-25, 13:37
Check out teepees by Kifaru and Titanium Goat. They look like the ticket for cold weather. Woodswalker, a poster here has one and uses it in the winter alot. The four-man Kifaru won an award from Backpacker magazine several years ago. Kifaru's website has a lot of articles on teepees and winter camping, hunting, rifles and ballistics, land navigation, good stuff. Patrick Smith, the owner, used to own Mountainsmith Inc. All the stuff he sells is US made by contractors for him, mostly from people he's known a long time.

dropkick
2007-10-26, 01:52
I second Take-a-knee's recommendation.

While I don't have personal experience with the Kifaru, I've read about many people using them in the winter and doing well. Also my own experience says that a steep walled tee pee style tent would be a good choice for snow camping.

I do have quite a bit of experience at using canvas wall tents during the winter, as I used them in hunting camp and occasionally when ice fishing.

A canvas wall tent weighs quite a bit (I recommend getting a sled or some form of cart to move your tent around if you're taking it more than 20 feet from your vehicle).

If there is going to be heavy snows you also have to get up and clear the roof occasionally or put an angled tarp overhead to shed the snow (we often used a canvas hay tarp - this was pre poly tarps). You don't want to wake up with the tent on top of you. In my youth I actually heard of people dying when this happened (very rare).

You also have to have somewhere you can completely dry the tent before storing it or it will mold and you will destroy it. (I hung it from the rafters in the garage).

I still use my wall tents as they are the most comfortable of camping tents.
However I usually only use them from spring to fall and stay in the back of my truck or sleep on the ground under a tarp during the winter.

-I have a nice plywood bed I built in my topper. There's no heat, but I just live with the cold mornings.

Iceman
2007-10-26, 10:26
Relying on a heat source while winter camping is generally not a good idea, IMHO. When we winter camp, we have no heat source. No stove, no heater, nothing. If the clothing you have chosen will not keep you alive and warm, then you are too close to the edge. All it takes is one failure to ruin your trip.

Remember, part of the fun of winter camping is the experience. If you need a stove to make it memorable, so be it, but you might be able to have just as much fun at the ski lodge in front of the fireplace.

I have found that our winter trips into snow country are fun when below freezing as long as we are all warm with the clothing we have chosen. Snow stays frozen even on our clothing, to be swept away dry. If we had a heat source, putting a thaw on things, I feel that campers would get wet, and then cold. Frozen and dry is the way to go fo me....we are 98.6 on the inside...

CoyoteWhips
2007-10-26, 15:16
I have found that our winter trips into snow country are fun when below freezing as long as we are all warm with the clothing we have chosen. Snow stays frozen even on our clothing, to be swept away dry. If we had a heat source, putting a thaw on things, I feel that campers would get wet, and then cold. Frozen and dry is the way to go fo me....we are 98.6 on the inside...

How do you fry your fish?

GGS
2007-10-27, 00:40
I purchased a Cabela's Alaknak II tent a couple of months ago for car camping and I love it. I got the 9x9 size. There is a 12x12 size and a 12x20 size as well. Check out the details here http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat20075-cat550002_TGP&rid=&indexId=cat550002&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=1&parentType=index&parentId=cat550002&id=0005884 Note you can also get an add on vestibule, great for throwing boots, wood, and extra gear to give you more room in the tent itself. The tent is a center pole design with additional poles and lines for the walls. I can set it up by myself in 30 minutes. I haven't tried it in snow yet but with the XTC fabric and steep pyramid style roof snow should slide off easily, if not by itself then with a good shake of the center pole.

Mine came included with the Outfitter stove assembly for an extra $49. The stove is a 13"x13"x24" and it included 80" of collapsible 5" stovepipe, a damper, and spark arrestor (all also from Cabela's). The stove is not the best made IMO - I had to take a Dremel tool to it to get the door latch to close - but for $49 you can't go wrong.

This is definitely a CAR CAMPING tent. All the poles and stakes are heavy steel, this tent in bag weighs almost 60# and I have the SMALL one.

GGS
2007-10-27, 00:43
Hey curious, how does Woods Walker and others get pictures to show inline with the message text? I can't do it.

GGS
2007-10-27, 00:59
Adding to my post here. This [Alaknak] setup cost around $550. This is cheaper than some of the canvas wall tent designs I saw, at least those that are listed at Cabela's. Of course the larger sized Alaknak tents would cost more. I went with this tent because I do car camping with a group of people where this tent would be the best choice, plus it's easy for me to set up by myself if I want to.

My dream goal would be to backpack or pulk with a tipi style tent and woodstove like the Kifaru. http://www.kifaru.net/ However the cost of this tent and stove is over a grand, which is out of my reach at this time. If you HAVE this money to spend then this would be my recommendation. You can car camp, backpack, pulk sled, do it all with this tipi/stove combination.

I'm brainstorming a home brew version of a tipi tent and stove which I hope will give me this ability and save me $$ at the same time. Stay tuned...

dropkick
2007-10-27, 01:04
Hey curious, how does Woods Walker and others get pictures to show inline with the message text? I can't do it.

You have to join one of the online photo sharing sites, post your pic there, and then link to the photo at the photo site (use the post card looking icon up top when posting "insert image").

GGS
2007-10-27, 01:36
You have to join one of the online photo sharing sites, post your pic there, and then link to the photo at the photo site (use the post card looking icon up top when posting "insert image").

Aha! Thanks Dropkick!

POWERSTAND
2007-10-29, 00:50
How about a Kifaru Tipi and stove. Look @ www.kifaru.com
This is mostly some high-end military / hunting equipment manufacturing company. But they build quality gear and the owner used to own Mountainsmith.

Tipi Walter
2008-01-11, 21:13
I purchased a Cabela's Alaknak II tent a couple of months ago for car camping and I love it. I got the 9x9 size. There is a 12x12 size and a 12x20 size as well. Check out the details here http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat20075-cat550002_TGP&rid=&indexId=cat550002&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=1&parentType=index&parentId=cat550002&id=0005884 Note you can also get an add on vestibule, great for throwing boots, wood, and extra gear to give you more room in the tent itself. The tent is a center pole design with additional poles and lines for the walls. I can set it up by myself in 30 minutes. I haven't tried it in snow yet but with the XTC fabric and steep pyramid style roof snow should slide off easily, if not by itself then with a good shake of the center pole.

Mine came included with the Outfitter stove assembly for an extra $49. The stove is a 13"x13"x24" and it included 80" of collapsible 5" stovepipe, a damper, and spark arrestor (all also from Cabela's). The stove is not the best made IMO - I had to take a Dremel tool to it to get the door latch to close - but for $49 you can't go wrong.

This is definitely a CAR CAMPING tent. All the poles and stakes are heavy steel, this tent in bag weighs almost 60# and I have the SMALL one.

Great post and great fotogs, GGS. For the last 6 years I have been living in a Cabelas 12x12 extreme weather outfitter tent and use a propane Buddy heater for warmth in the winter. I almost went with the Alaknak but just wasn't sure about the single wall of that tent and how it would work over the long haul.

Anyone serious about using a wood stove in their tent should check out the Four Dog Stove company:

www.fourdog.com/page2.html

As far as I can tell they make the best small woodstoves on the planet, and the titanium tho expensive might be good for hauling(8 pounds). Not for backpacking, but for setting up a decent basecamp using either a canvas tipi, a wall tent, a Alaknak style or whatever.

Here's some fotogs of my current setup:

fiddlehead
2008-01-11, 22:16
2 thoughts come to my mind while reading this thread:

1/ the tepee idea is a good one. Shed's snow easily and has lots of room. I have a Black Diamond Mega-Mid which is plenty big for 2 people, a little crowded for 3 or 4.

2/ Years ago, on 2 of my thru hikes, i used a tent that i designed and built myself that is perfect for winter camping. Especially if you have a fire.

we called it the "wedge". Basically you take a line (rope) tied between two trees about breast height. Then you sew or clip a tarp to the line and stake the back down like a lean to. we then cut sides and sewed them on (triangles) that could be clipped on just like the front is clipped to the rope.

You can put a stick inside to hold give more headroom. YOu can make the tent as big as you like depending on the size of your tarp.

We then added a bug net (not necessary in winter of course) flap, and then also a rip stop nylon flap in case of bad weather that could close off the front and staked down also.

I used this tent for a thru of the AT in '95 and also a thru of the PCT in '96.
It was a nice, big, comfortable tent that many envied cause we had a view, could have heat from a nice fire in front, and lots of room for cooking or whatever.

I only wish i had a picture of it.

I also made a 5 person one out of heavy blue tarps for canoe camping. It got pretty heavy though but was great in a rainstorm.

good luck designing your own. Lots of fun and i must say, for winter camping, a fire, and view is important. The nights are too long to be cooped up in a box with your book or whatever. Better to spend your time cooking or drinking or fussing with your fire or enjoying the view if possible.

thanks for the site Rock. I hope whiteblaze is back soon but this is just as good, aye?

GGS
2008-01-12, 00:22
Fiddlehead, your design looks interesting. If you don't have pictures could you post a diagram of it?

Turk
2008-01-12, 19:16
Not yet available to the public, but proving an invaluable luxury piece of equipment, check out the Jacks R Better Hammock Tent.

My gear-test/review is a work in progress on my website:
http://www.ehko.info

I will have a more robust review and write-up by mid Feb. This is one of the rigs I will be using on a snowshoe and pulk trip I will be taking into Nunavut in just a couple more weeks.

CaSteve
2008-10-17, 01:26
I've been thinking about a winter car camping tent. Does anyone have experience with Cabela's Alaskan Guide (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?id=0043361&navCount=0&parentId=cat550002&masterpathid=&navAction=push&cmCat=0808_outfittercamp-catfeatcamp&parentType=index&indexId=cat550002&rid=) tents?

BTW, Cabela's is selling tipis (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0058862518615a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntt=teepee&Ntk=Products_liberal&sort=all&Go.y=0&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&_D%3Asort=+&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form1&Go.x=0&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1) now.

Tipi Walter
2008-10-17, 17:19
Relying on a heat source while winter camping is generally not a good idea, IMHO. When we winter camp, we have no heat source. No stove, no heater, nothing. If the clothing you have chosen will not keep you alive and warm, then you are too close to the edge. All it takes is one failure to ruin your trip.

Many people have spent long-term time living in tents/tipis while using wood heat, either an open firepit or a woodstove. It's actually a great idea and is about the only way to survive harsh winters when staying out for months or years at a time. One of the shelters-of-choice 10,000 years ago in North America was the simple tripod tipi shell covered in animal hides with a circle of stones outside to hold down the skins and a top hole for the fire smoke to escape. These ancient small rock circles have been found thruout the continent by the European immigrants and are remnants of earlier habitation.


I've been thinking about a winter car camping tent. Does anyone have experience with Cabela's Alaskan Guide (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?id=0043361&navCount=0&parentId=cat550002&masterpathid=&navAction=push&cmCat=0808_outfittercamp-catfeatcamp&parentType=index&indexId=cat550002&rid=) tents?

BTW, Cabela's is selling tipis (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0058862518615a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntt=teepee&Ntk=Products_liberal&sort=all&Go.y=0&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&_D%3Asort=+&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form1&Go.x=0&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1) now.

I think the Alaskan Guide tent would be a perfect basecamp/winter tent, especially the 12x12 model with the aluminum poles. On the other hand, you could consider the much beefier Outfitter Xtreme dome tent at a $100 more(and much heavier, from 31 lbs for the Guide to 72 for the Xtreme).

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=0808_outfittercamp-catfeatcamp-cat20103_TGP&id=0024840516306a&navCount=3&podId=0024840&parentId=cat20103&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat20103&hasJS=true

I have used the Outfitter 12x12 tent for the last 4 years as a basecamp tent in all seasons and it has served me well with no blowouts or leaks:

MRH
2008-10-17, 21:23
I've got the Cabelas Big Horn II tent and bought a 4-dog-sove several years ago... the most snow I had on it was about 1 foot and the coldest was -8 and with the stove it stayed 65 to 70 deg. Only had to fill it 1 time durning the night. The bighorn II has several vents in it and I had to close off a few due to the wind blowing though the vents. I've had this tent for 5 years and its been great...

I'll try to get some pics up...

MRH
2008-10-17, 21:45
A few pic's of my Cabelas Big Horn II and 4-dog-stove.

Camping at the lake..

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/Backpacking/100_0304.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/Backpacking/100_0306.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/Backpacking/100_0307.jpg

4-Dog-Stove Pics

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/4-dog-stove/100_1139.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/4-dog-stove/100_1145.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/4-dog-stove/100_1146.jpg

CaSteve
2008-10-17, 22:20
I think the Alaskan Guide tent would be a perfect basecamp/winter tent, especially the 12x12 model with the aluminum poles. On the other hand, you could consider the much beefier Outfitter Xtreme dome tent at a $100 more(and much heavier, from 31 lbs for the Guide to 72 for the Xtreme).

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=0808_outfittercamp-catfeatcamp-cat20103_TGP&id=0024840516306a&navCount=3&podId=0024840&parentId=cat20103&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat20103&hasJS=true

I have used the Outfitter 12x12 tent for the last 4 years as a basecamp tent in all seasons and it has served me well with no blowouts or leaks:

Tipi Walter,

What is the setup time/effort on your Outfitter Xtreme tent?

-Steve

MRH
2008-10-17, 22:28
What the best way to Attach Thumbnails... I only know how to post pic's through Photobucket...

CaSteve
2008-10-17, 22:45
What the best way to Attach Thumbnails... I only know how to post pic's through Photobucket...

Under 'Additional Options' there is 'Attach Files'. I think that's how you do it.

Tipi Walter
2008-10-18, 01:06
I've got the Cabelas Big Horn II tent and bought a 4-dog-sove several years ago... the most snow I had on it was about 1 foot and the coldest was -8 and with the stove it stayed 65 to 70 deg. Only had to feel 1 time durning the night. The bighorn II has several vents in it and I had to close off a few due to the wind blowing though the vents. I've had this tent for 5 years and its been great...

I'll try to get some pics up...

I like your setup, especially the Four Dog stove, probably the best camping stove ever made. I almost went with one of the big Cabelas stove-type tents, but was concerned that maybe the single wall would leak over time. Does your tent have any small leaks in a hard rain?? Especially around the lower side seams by the floor?


Tipi Walter,

What is the setup time/effort on your Outfitter Xtreme tent?

-Steve

It's a four-pole config with a top hub with a hook to hold up the hanging inner tent body. With proper stake placement(beefy long steel stakes)and with all the guylines pegged(about 16), not to mention tent and fly bottom stakes, the whole procedure takes about 45 minutes. Like the Big Horn II tent, the Xtreme Outfitter has many black rope guylines running from the side and these help enormously to keep the tent stable in high winds. Getting the fly over the frame and tent body is a bit tricky but can be done alone using a long stick or pole. I set up my tent about 4 years ago and it's never been taken down, just used nightly to get my all-important bag nights.

MRH
2008-10-18, 01:41
[QUOTE=Tipi Walter;47423]I like your setup, especially the Four Dog stove, probably the best camping stove ever made. I almost went with one of the big Cabelas stove-type tents, but was concerned that maybe the single wall would leak over time. Does your tent have any small leaks in a hard rain?? Especially around the lower side seams by the floor?

Tipi Walter, I look really hard at the XWT like u have and was going to buy one, But I just wanted a stove in my tent... What I liked about the Big Horn II was the slopped and how it was made... I can put it up myself in 20 to 30 min., but I do leave the ropes attached when I take it down. I've had it rain 4 solid days,,, somtimes very hard, and I can say this tent never leaked and handles the winds very well. I've had it for 5 years now and I'm very impressed with it. I will buy another one if ever needed... I agree with u about the 4-dog-stove. IMO its the best stove out there. I really like the baffle and its very air tight. I've never had to use the spark arrester plus the baffle keeps the box hotter to cook on. I only have to refill the stove one time durning the night, usually around 4am. I have a damper on it but the air input adjustment does a great job controlling the burn time.



CASteve,,, Thanks for the info...

CaSteve
2008-10-18, 02:15
Mike,

Do the legs detach from the Four Dog stove for transport?

-Steve

MRH
2008-10-18, 02:51
Steve,,, Yes, they slide in and out of a slot... everything fits in the box for transport.

generoll
2008-10-18, 09:14
In a moment of temporary insanity I purchased the Kifaru 6 man tipi and stove. It will hold 3-4 people plus gear and the stove or 6 people if you leave all your gear outside. I broke mine down into 3 easily managed loads and backpacked with it. I have a roll of 4' Tyvek which I used to make ground cloths.

Pros:

Light weight, extra tie downs for high winds, very warm when stove is lit. Standing headroom at center.

Cons:

Large footprint (14' +/-), circular pattern leaves some wasted space, unknown durability of silnylon. Center pole limits interior usage.

Neutral:

Small stove heats well, but size limits the wood it can handle. About the thickness of your wrist and 8-10" in length. Plan on either staying up to restoke it during the night or keeping what you need to make a new fire in the morning before you get out of the bag. The stove pipe will literally turn red from the heat when the stove is burning well so hands off! Guess it's good that you have the center pole when you're using the stove as it helps keep you away from the pipe. My daughter managed to burn a hole in her new pants by getting too close to the stove.

kayak karl
2008-10-19, 21:05
anyone hear from CoyoteWhips? he was a character :)

AMPEX799
2008-10-31, 17:53
http://www.kifaru.net/TIPI.HTM The bigger stoves are pretty interesting, the tipis have been mentioned