PDA

View Full Version : Cockroaches!!!



Mutinousdoug
2008-01-05, 00:30
There's a bunch of them!

rubble_double
2008-01-05, 03:18
Try stomping on them..lol...or try using a cockroach repellant spray.

sailingsoul
2008-01-05, 17:54
I say, Spammers are Vermin. Once in the Dominican Republic, I anchored to close to the shore and I had a rat swim out to my boat and climbed up my anchor line. What was he thinking? A new life on a yacht, sweet. Rats cause a lot of damage. They have to constantly chew on things to keep there teeth from growing too long, since there teeth continually grow. If I was to have a choice, I'd take roaches over the damage rats can do. I didn't throw that rat off my boat. I made that rat regret his move. Sgt Rock treats spammers, like I did my rat. He doesn't just delete them, He makes them regret there move. They sign up to a forum never to learn and/or contribute, as regular users. They sign up only to spam, leaches they are. If not for the chance to make a buck they would have never joined. I have no problem with users who contribute to the forum having a link in there signature line. Like rubble_double, here. I take great notice of members who give a link and never contribute anything of real value, ones who replies just to get there link up again. I do go to there site and go through it. I will never spend money until they prove they are not a spammer. Sgt Rock leaves spammer links up so we all know who does not deserve our business. I hope rubble_double is a contributor and not a spammer. If he is a spammer I know his site and will not spend my money there. Time will tell. SS :captain:

Amigi
2008-01-05, 20:41
Well, campinggear...com doesnt have a single thing for sale, just the "Bookmark Us!" ( and let us put a tracking cookie on your PC ). I went through every letter and nothing. Also, Coupon sites are notorious adware and malware generators. That's how the old "nail.exe" or Gator started out in its malware infancy.

pure_mahem
2008-01-05, 20:42
Looks like a spammer to me the input I've seen from him looks like he skims the previous post for a key word and then posts of topically on it. Talking about hamburger helper and he posts he likes hamburgers, someone posts a new recipe that they developed on there own and say he loves it he's had it 3-4 times and its delicious, then he posts in a spammer post about spammers all just to get his signature link up. SPAMMER I SAY!

oops56
2008-01-05, 21:57
Yep talking about spam i am getting a little low must get more:beer:

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d52/oops62/th_spram.jpg (http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d52/oops62/spram.jpg)

dropkick
2008-01-06, 01:08
Back to cockroaches.
When I was at Ft. Gordon, Georgia I had a house a few miles off base and I had cockroaches.
I bombed the house.
I sprinkles powders along the walls, in the corners, and under the counters.
I bleached my cupboards and put all my food in plastic containers.
I still had cockroaches.
I gave up and just started ignoring them.


Actually that's kind of like spammers....

pure_mahem
2008-01-06, 01:51
sure fire cure burn the little buggers! but it's got to be a sneak attack so the don't have a chance to get away. come home from work with a bag of marshmellows after leaving the kitchen curtains in the toaster. whoosh problem solved! Hey you said you wanted to get rid of the roaches not keep the house too!

Iceman
2008-01-06, 20:34
Sorry, I have never seen a cockroach. Either we do not have them out here in the Pacific Northwest, or I keep a clean home.... One or the other, maybe both....

pure_mahem
2008-01-06, 21:29
The only time I ever actually saw one in person was on the school bus when I was in highschool. This girl, not noted for being the cleanest person and her family later being evicte from their home for condemnation, opened her book bag and it scurried out! Needless to say she sat by herself A LOT!

dropkick
2008-01-07, 04:03
Sorry, I have never seen a cockroach. Either we do not have them out here in the Pacific Northwest, or I keep a clean home.... One or the other, maybe both....
Never seen one here in Montana either.
Supposedly they're every where though.

In the Ft. Gordon/Augusta GA. area they were all over the place.

One night while I was there the M.P.s had pulled the fire alarm to get us outside.
-They did this so they could run drug dogs through the barracks (they did it at night every few months - usually just before inspection - never found anything, just ruined our floors).

Anyway, we had a want-a-be geek in my company.
He strolled over to where the women in our company were huddled together talking. As he was standing there with them every once in a while he would pick something out of one hand and eat it. All the sudden the group of girls broke apart with a bunch of squeals. They'd seen what he was eating - cockroaches.

The point I wanted to make though was that he collected these cockroaches at the barracks. And those of you with Army background know that those barracks were clean.
We still had cockroaches.

-Oddly while I was working in Atlanta a few years ago I never saw any there. You would think what with being in the same state and the city being further south there would be some though.

jimtanker
2008-01-07, 10:59
No cockroaches Iceman? What about Earwigs? They are the cockroaches of the NW.

sailingsoul
2008-01-07, 18:49
Life is too freaky sometimes. Would you all believe, for a few months now, that I have been wanting to do a website on cockroaches? Go figure! It would be my first site ever. I will ask SGT if it's OK to add a link on a signature line, if it ever gets put up. This thread should be lame by then but who knows?
Dropkick, you are right. Roaches can set up "house keeping" and be a problem in the cleanest of homes. Whether they stay, is a matter of what happens when they're spotted. SS :captain:

Iceman
2008-01-07, 22:47
No cockroaches Iceman? What about Earwigs? They are the cockroaches of the NW.

Never heard of them..... Did somebody say something? .....

Hey Jimtanker, those earwigs are pretty cool little devils arent they! You are one of the more worldly dudes here, are earwigs found in other areas too?

Has anyone ever slipped on a ten inch banana slug and reached out only to grab "devils club" with your bare hands?

john pickett
2008-01-08, 18:30
Iceman,
Maybe the reason you haven't seen them is:
You have nothing they want!
After all, roaches and lawyers both have standards.:aetsch:
John Pickett

MalTheElder
2008-01-08, 21:57
Roach Rules:

#1. The further south you are, the bigger the roaches. Up North y'all have roaches; in Florida we have Palmetto bugs (super-sized); on St. Croix we had Mahogany Birds (think of the mythical Roc, or a C-5). Sailingsoul may have met some of these down home this past year.

#2. They love humans. We provide 'em such nice places to live, with room service.

#3. You can't kill 'em all. They're reportedly found fat and happy outside the total destruction areas of nuke tests---right after the test! Best you can do is knock 'em down to an occasional nuisance and try to keep them there.

#4. A handful makes a meal. Roast 'em, pull off the legs and such, add hot sauce. Um-yum.

Mucho gusto! :eating:
Chuck

Iceman
2008-01-08, 23:10
John Picket, you are probably right, I have no money, and I lick my plate clean. :ahhhhh:

deadeye
2008-01-09, 00:05
Never heard of them..... Did somebody say something? .....

Hey Jimtanker, those earwigs are pretty cool little devils arent they! You are one of the more worldly dudes here, are earwigs found in other areas too?

Has anyone ever slipped on a ten inch banana slug and reached out only to grab "devils club" with your bare hands?


Sure, we got earwigs in New England. Come spring, we'll frequently have one of the cirtters in the bathtub in the a.m. My wife has a certain "earwig scream" that lets me know they've arrived (it's definitely different from the spider scream).

But we got nothing like those banana slugs... yuk!

dropkick
2008-01-10, 00:33
Earwigs inside the house are normally a warning sign.
If you find them you should look for leaking pipes and rotting wood.
Earwigs only thrive in damp places.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/Earwig_on_white_background.jpg/240px-Earwig_on_white_background.jpg

pure_mahem
2008-01-10, 12:48
I've seen those before around rotting wood like you said whe doing demo work in the summer when I was going to school. They look like a cross between a grass hopper and a cockroach. any body know if there pincher looking tail has a function or thats just the way they are made?

JAK
2008-01-10, 13:43
We have earwigs, in the garden mostly.
I understand they are a type of cockroach.

dropkick
2008-01-11, 03:49
I've seen those before around rotting wood like you said whe doing demo work in the summer when I was going to school. They look like a cross between a grass hopper and a cockroach. any body know if there pincher looking tail has a function or thats just the way they are made?

I think the pincer on it's tail is supposed to confuse or scare predators.
As far as I know they can't actually do anything with it.

JAK
2008-01-11, 08:50
I think the pincer on it's tail is supposed to confuse or scare predators.
As far as I know they can't actually do anything with it.I've heard they can dig from one ear to the other and lay eggs along the way. :afraid:

4eyedbuzzard
2008-01-11, 14:29
They crawl in one ear, eat through your brain, then crawl out the other ear.:afraid:

They actually just like damp decaying matter mostly, and also eat aphids mites, etc. but unlike roaches they usually breed outside and only come in to forage - unless you've got a really damp messy basement that is a breeding ground for stuff they eat. Then sometimes they'll set up camp.

My wife agrees though with others who call them the roach of the north country.

saimyoji
2008-01-11, 15:12
Give this a read

http://web.mit.edu/activities/voodoo/is742/roaches.html

Rick
2008-01-11, 21:49
Wow.. something i can actually contribute to. Spent the better part of 30 years as a pest control operator (exterminator) and many, many hours in jails, prisons, factories, food processing plants, restaurants, bars, colleges & dorms, warehouses, distribution centers and truck transfer stations
In the Northern states there is an issue with German Cockroaches (http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/housingandclothing/DK1003.html), which are much smaller than the southern American roaches (Palmetto bugs) and tend to stay indoors as opposed to the Brown-banded roach and the oriental Roach, which are found in the mid-south to south.

I have too many bad memories of walking into housing projects to do clean-outs, where the apartments were 110 degrees, with the oven running at full bake and the windows were opened to cool the house if it got too hot. Bacon grease everywhere - sink, counters, floor, stove top.. Smell of rancid everywhere.
You would start to spray the baseboards first - form a perimeter so that nothing escapes, then you move the fridge 4 inches from the wall and that solid thick black coat of paint on the wall would come alive with thousands of roaches running everywhere. We would hit them with a fan spray of Piperonyl butoxide mixed in a light oil. knock them dead in seconds (aways die on their backs) They would run up the wall and on the ceiling and dozens would drop on you clicking on your hard hat as they fell. You would look over and see three or four crawling up your arm or shoulder. 4-5 on your pant leg.
We used to tuck pants into socks and button shirt sleeves. There were more than a few times after a job that you undress to your skivvies and shake you clothes out before getting into the truck. nothing like having a female dragging an egg case crawl out of your pants cuff and let loose with that egg case under your driver seat. 2 days later you would have a roach jungle in your vehicles.
Sorry for that graphics, but when you deal with a lot of ignorant careless filthy people in ghetto's and housing projects, you come in contact with more disease carrying filth than most people can care to stomach. there not all bad. The inner city ones managed by city or counties always seemed to be worse than smaller private ones managed by others. (although slumlords took the cake.)

Skidsteer
2008-01-11, 22:28
Pretty inventive avatar! Lol. :biggrin:

GGS
2008-01-12, 01:29
The key in exterminating cockroaches is to remember they seek food just like any other creature. Even a thorough spraying by an exterminator will leave a few roaches alive somewhere in the cracks and walls. If you eliminate the food source the few left will be unable to thrive and eventually they will leave/die and you will be rid of the problem.

Roaches thrive on unclean kitchens, especially splattered cooking grease. As Rick mentioned in his post, when he went in to exterminate he found bacon grease everywhere. Examine your cooking range and the area around it, the floor around/under, and the wall behind. Scrape your fingernails in these areas. If you can carve up grease then you have what it takes to farm roaches. No effort required! All it takes is one egg bearing roach wandering through to find your waiting smorgasborg...

My first duplex purchase inherited a welfare family with most of a year's lease left. Unbenownst to me this family had a habit of frying food in pans with no lid and not bothering to clean up the splatter. I moved in upstairs, they lived downstairs. I had the place exterminated for roaches. 30 days later roaches back. I exterminated every month and we still had roaches. I was told all the myths - once you had roaches you could never get rid of them, etc. etc.

Finally family moves out. Being a night owl I went in to clean up at nighttime. Scene exactly as described by Rick - swarms of roaches everywhere, scurrying into cracks every time a light was turned on or a door was opened, falling off the ceiling into my hair, down the back of my neck. Gross! The grease around the stove was so thick you could scrape it up with a shovel.

I junked the stove without even trying to clean it. $450 for a new range. Major cleanup included replacing floor tiles around the stove, repainting all surfaces, and refinishing nearby cupboards. Then I had the place exterminated one more time.

Roaches gone. I lived there for another two years so if there was ANY comeback I would have noticed. Not a one.

Now for barracks. I have no doubt barracks are scrubbed clean. However in barracks food preparation takes place most of the day, using food quantities to feed large groups. Large scale food prep = large scale splattered grease, dropped food choppings, flour, etc. that would be exposed for several hours throughout the day. Second, barracks are not newly constructed million dollar homes. Many are old buildings that have settled over the years and may contain gaps, cracks, etc. in the walls, floorboards, tiles, molding, etc. These gaps and cracks not only trap food and grease, they provide hiding places for roaches. So there is always roaches and always food for them to multiply. Because the barracks are cleaned so well there is never a huge infestation of roaches. But there will always be some.

The ultimate roach removal formula:
COMPLETE cleanup of all food particles especially cooking grease
EXTERMINATE
Repeat if necessary

wanderer42460
2008-01-12, 06:26
Sorry, I have never seen a cockroach. Either we do not have them out here in the Pacific Northwest, or I keep a clean home.... One or the other, maybe both....

You got 'em in the Pacific Northwest. Seattle is overrun with them, been there, seen that...........:angel:

wanderer42460
2008-01-12, 06:32
And when I was living in Jackson Hole back in the 80's cockroaches were one of the main wildlife scenes...........

dropkick
2008-01-12, 23:50
The key in exterminating cockroaches is to remember they seek food just like any other creature. Even a thorough spraying by an exterminator will leave a few roaches alive somewhere in the cracks and walls. If you eliminate the food source the few left will be unable to thrive and eventually they will leave/die and you will be rid of the problem.

Now for barracks. I have no doubt barracks are scrubbed clean. However in barracks food preparation takes place most of the day, using food quantities to feed large groups. Large scale food prep = large scale splattered grease, dropped food choppings, flour, etc. that would be exposed for several hours throughout the day. Second, barracks are not newly constructed million dollar homes. Many are old buildings that have settled over the years and may contain gaps, cracks, etc. in the walls, floorboards, tiles, molding, etc. These gaps and cracks not only trap food and grease, they provide hiding places for roaches. So there is always roaches and always food for them to multiply. Because the barracks are cleaned so well there is never a huge infestation of roaches. But there will always be some.

The ultimate roach removal formula:
COMPLETE cleanup of all food particles especially cooking grease
EXTERMINATE
Repeat if necessary

Barracks have no food preparation.
Barracks are sleeping quarters.
Food preparation and eating are done in a separate building - the mess hall.

I have no idea where you got the idea that military buildings are in disrepair. Any gaps or cracks that may develop from settling are in most instances patched and painted over as soon as they occur.

Also my home in Augusta wasn't a pig sty. I don't live in filth. I wash my dishes daily and keep my kitchen and home clean.
It was a newly built home in a new development (Hepzibah, GA).

If you read my post you might have noticed that I also tried putting all my food in plastic containers after cleaning the cupboards out and sterilizing them. Thereby eliminating any food source.
IT DIDN'T WORK.

I'm glad it worked for you, but your single encounter with cockroaches doesn't make you an expert.

GGS
2008-01-13, 01:58
Barracks have no food preparation.
Barracks are sleeping quarters.
Food preparation and eating are done in a separate building - the mess hall.

I have no idea where you got the idea that military buildings are in disrepair. Any gaps or cracks that may develop from settling are in most instances patched and painted over as soon as they occur.

Also my home in Augusta wasn't a pig sty. I don't live in filth. I wash my dishes daily and keep my kitchen and home clean.
It was a newly built home in a new development (Hepzibah, GA).

If you read my post you might have noticed that I also tried putting all my food in plastic containers after cleaning the cupboards out and sterilizing them. Thereby eliminating any food source. IT DIDN'T WORK.

I'm glad it worked for you, but your single encounter with cockroaches doesn't make you an expert.

DK, sorry, my post wasn't meant to insult, just relay my experience. No I am not an expert. But we did have a horrible roach problem and it was eliminated after more than a year of trial and error, and this is what I've learned from that ordeal. Perhaps that is worth something to someone?

In re-reading your post I caught one thing I didn't remember before. I did try various over-the-counter roach bombs, roach sprays, roach powders, etc. I succeeded in killing a few roaches. I did not make much of a dent on our roach problem. It wasn't until I hired a _professional exterminator_ to come in and spray that I could mark up some overwhelming campaign victories. The pros have license to use chemicals that aren't available at your local supermarket. Once I finally cleaned up the food source a final spraying was all that was needed, and problem gone.

The other thing to remember is the source of food may be something other than you, or your kitchen. _My_ kitchen was clean, yet I still had a roach problem. The roach farm turned out to be my neighbors. This would be the more likely case in, say, an apartment than a house. If your neighbor, say, is a beekeeper it would be rational to expect you'd find more than an average number of bees in your yard, even if you dig up all your flowers.

Again, in my experience, the ultimate roach removal formula:
1. COMPLETE cleanup of all food particles especially cooking grease
2. EXTERMINATE [utilizing a professional exterminator]
Repeat if necessary

And good grief, if you already keep a clean house don't take offense to #1! I'm just being thorough here.

Rick
2008-01-13, 13:38
Wow, I think you are both correct in a sense....
While there is a greater propensity for roaches to propagate in areas that have less stress on the roach. Bathrooms, kitchens, food processing machinery.... they can survive in other areas or use the plumbing or electrical system to migrate.
As I was leaving the industry, we were under assail from enviro groups about the use of insecticides and we started cleaning ourselves up a bit and moved to Integrated Pest management (IPM) rather than being baseboard jockeys with a spray-can. This meant we could charge more, but we would now offer services like caulking cracks, finding leaks in kitchens under appliances, using bait stations an glue-boards as monitoring devices....

It doesn't matter how clean you are, anyone can get roaches. It matters how clean you are, if the roaches are going to survive. I used to have a couple of prisons and though I would spend hours in them, there were always roaches. We got smart and started investigating the pallets that the food came in on and found that the cracks in the pallets were always infested and each week, new deliveries meant new roaches.
So now we try to stress the environment - remove food, water and shelter. it is difficult, since roaches will really try anything - feces, insect carcasses, insulation, glue, urine (sugar),dead skin (In bedding where it sloughs off in your sleep.
It has always been and industry joke, but the toughest places are the cleanest places, because it is so hard to find infestations. Including removing all electrical outlets and dusting conduits, removing faucet and toilet face plates, drain covers for sanitary and sewer drains and bolt caps off toilets, getting underneath sink cabinets and checking the internal ledges of the cabinets (small mirrors come in handy). As soon as you see the antennae moving so slightly, feeling the air, you know you found them.
we have even found them nesting inside hollow internal doors. You see the evidence of them before you see them. They tend to have a lot of droppings wherever they are nesting/laying over. It is the scent of these droppings (Pheromones perhaps) that allows them to quickly find their home. after a while you could start to smell them yourself. :beer: