PDA

View Full Version : What is your shelter of choice and why?



Frolicking Dino
2008-03-14, 08:29
We Dinos have gone ultralight and now use Antigravity Gear's 10' Brawny tarptent (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=AGTTTP10) (the old Brawny tarp with a floor). The tent plus pole and stakes weighs 23 ozs, 42" peak height and has 38.25 sq ft plus 18 sq ft in the vestibule. We use one of our silnylon ponchos (http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=999634) (our rain gear and pack cover - 9.5 ozs) instead of the provided vestibule to save 3.1 ozs (weight saving included in weight mentioned) Pack size is 6" x 9" plus three 14" tent pole sections.

Our reasons for going this route - weight savings obviously, but also gives us enough space to keep gear inside and has room to cook on the covered porch (vestibule deployed as a porch) in the rain. It is enclosed enough that he-dino feels safe (he just has to have an enclosed area to sleep). The design is such that she-dino doesn't get claustrophobia inside - a real problem with some of the ultralight options. In really rainy weather we also carry a large silnylon tarp (10' x 12' - 19 ozs) That is not an ultralight option, but it is certainly really nice to have tons of dry space in a rainstorm and to have a dry place out of the wind for rest stops - lunch.

We have tried a lot of options - hammocks, tarp plus bivy, regular tents - and this combo seems to fit our needs.

So, what are you folks using these days?

Lone Wolf
2008-03-14, 08:45
oh. thought this was about AT shelters. they all suck.

i use a 1 man northface canyonlands tent

dixicritter
2008-03-14, 09:10
I haven't actually settled on which shelter I'm satisfied with yet honestly, but I know it will be a hammock of some type.

So far I've tried the Hennesey Desert Rat, which I thought slept just fine. The only problem I had was I felt claustrophobic in it. Nothing against the hammock itself really just my own problem. LOL.

I have now made a top loader that I'm mostly satisfied with. I'll just have to figure out how to use bug netting with it during the bug season. Minor issue. :)

The JRB guys sent me one of their Bridge hammocks to test out. I'm excited about trying this one. Even though it will weigh a little more than my homemade one I think that I might just like the fact that it won't close in around me like the traditional hammocks do. They tend to put my body in positions that don't allow me to get a whole lot of sleep. (I swear I'm going to get that hammock set up soon guys. Thanks again!!! Y'all are the greatest!!!)

So in answer to your question FD... I'm undecided at the moment other than to say a hammock of some variety... but I'm thinking it may end up being the JRB Bridge when all is said and done. :)

JAK
2008-03-14, 10:38
I use an old green nylon rain poncho/tarp I've had for awhile, usually just pegged down at two bottom corners and tied up at two top corners (the long way) to a single big spruce or pine tree stradling the trunk. Then my gortex bivy with a wide blue foam pad underneath. If it's not going to rain I skip the rain poncho/tarp. Some day I am going to try that idea of sandwiching wet clothes between two blue foam pads if I can find two 1/4" thick ones wide enough. Perhaps I could just fold one under at the top, with my damp sweater and boots and pad making a pillow and shoulder rest at the trunk end, and my JAM2 pack and dry stuff providing a ground pad for the rest of my legs. Needs some work.

Frolicking Dino
2008-03-14, 11:00
i use a 1 man northface canyonlands tenthttp://www.outdoorreview.com/Channels/OutdoorReview/images/products/product_79950.jpg
Neat tent - looks like a double wall version of Shires Rainbow

JAK
2008-03-14, 12:28
I am looking for one of those for summer, when hiking with Margaret. We now use her 6'x3' Ozark Trail kid's tent, but I am 6'1", and the rain fly was inspired by Brazilian swim wear.

warraghiyagey
2008-03-14, 12:46
Eureka Solitaire.
Great full lentgh top screen for great moonlight and stars.

dixicritter
2008-03-14, 12:51
Looks like I get all the trees to myself so far.:dancing2:

JAK
2008-03-14, 13:12
Looks like I get all the trees to myself so far.:dancing2:I'm working on that. :)
Hey, I do use one tree, but typically not a good hammock tree.

Come to think of it that makes me wonder what hammocks might be like up here as we have a somewhat different forest in many places. Next time I hike the footpath I will keep an eye out for good hammock spots. There are some spots where they would be ideal I think, from Rock's description of hammocking on hillsides and so forth, and other where they would be great for getting off soggy ground and wet snow in spring, though you might have to clear some dead branches when hammocking in a spruce grove.

I should take up hammocking for that reason alone, for the same reason I want to take up snaring rabbits and shooting squirrels for a while, just to gain a whole new perspective on the same old woods I never get tired of rediscovering.

enviro
2008-03-14, 13:59
I've used/use a number of different shelters, but like stoves I haven't settled on THE ONE. I tend to switch around based upon conditions, etc.

I have purchased a Hennesey Hammock (ultralight Explorer) and set it up at home a few times and played in it. I need to see how it will work for a night's sleeping, but it sure is comfortable to nap in. I'm a side sleeper and I toss and turn a bit, so the jury is still out. By the end of the summer I'll either be a convert or have it for sale. I do not anticipate using it during winter camping. I like to get on the solid ground with strong winds and cold.

I have a Go-lite Hut 1 single wall sylnylon shelter. I am not real happy with it due to the condensation, it leaked in a few places in heavy rain. The inside during cold rain was so wet that it was almost dripping and due to the shape of the shelter it was very difficult to not hit the walls with my down bag.

I really like sleeping under a tarp and all of the options available to pitch it. I have a 10x10 campmor nylon tarp and intend to get a 8x10 silnylon tarp to save weight.

I have a REI minimalist bivy that I set-up using my poncho to cover the face area and provide a dry place for gear storage and cooking etc. I like this set-up, but again condensation inside the bivy is an issue. I need to work on the best way to vent it and prevent some of that.

I have an SD Lightning tent. A very nice shelter. Easy set-up and a double wall tent really has some comfort advantages. Downside is that the weight is about 4lb 3 oz. But for a short weekend type trip that is not really very much.

I also have a 4 season SD tent that I rarely ever use due to the 9 lb weight. Great tent for 2, bombproof, roomy. I use only when extreme weather is likely.

So I'm not sure that I've found my favorite shelter. But, when I put together these lists I realize what a gear junkie I am. I like the look of that tarp tent FD mentioned, cause of the floor and netting.

Tipi Walter
2008-03-14, 23:08
http://www.outdoorreview.com/Channels/OutdoorReview/images/products/product_79950.jpg
Neat tent - looks like a double wall version of Shires Rainbow

The Canyonlands is a single pole hoop tent and there are others out there like the MSR Hubba which is close to the same. I had a friend who camped in the Slickrock with one:

enviro
2008-03-14, 23:10
Tipi is that photo taken on "the Bob"?

Nightwalker
2008-03-14, 23:16
This time of year I use a Sierra Designs Light Year CD. It's heavier than my Six Moon's Lunar Solo E, but it takes the wind and rain much better.

Hammock in the Summer, baby!

Tipi Walter
2008-03-14, 23:48
Tipi is that photo taken on "the Bob"?

Yes, it was on the Bob and belonged to Capn who was with Radar.

My favorite tent was an old North Face A-frame called the Tuolumne and I have only two old faded fotogs of the thing. The first one isn't too good. Notice the old tunnel snow door and the top vent. Single pole in the back, A frame in the front. Got it in '78 and used it until '89. Discontinued by North Face of course and replaced with the Westwind.

Tipi Walter
2008-03-15, 00:03
The Westwind was a great tent made by North Face and I lived in the thing for years. What happens when a company finds a product people like and use? They discontinue it. The Westwind's a 3 pole hoop tent with a full length fly with vestibule, etc. A great tent. The second fotog was in a national forest in SC and the last was on the AT by Laurel Falls(Hampton TN).

pure_mahem
2008-03-15, 00:10
Shelter of choice is no shelter, under God's sky enjoying the heavens! When driven by the weather a Speer winter tarp, LOL!

Frolicking Dino
2008-03-15, 00:26
Yes, it was on the Bob and belonged to Capn who was with Radar.

My favorite tent was an old North Face A-frame called the Tuolumne and I have only two old faded fotogs of the thing. The first one isn't too good. Notice the old tunnel snow door and the top vent. Single pole in the back, A frame in the front. Got it in '78 and used it until '89. Discontinued by North Face of course and replaced with the Westwind.I remember the Tuolumne - that was a great tent. I modified the first photo a bit to be able to see the tent better

warraghiyagey
2008-03-15, 04:39
I remember the Tuolumne - that was a great tent. I modified the first photo a bit to be able to see the tent better


And the candidate for worst FD photoshop ever goes to . . .

. . . "Spider Web Distracting from Bisected Klan Member!!!!"



Woohooooooo!!!!!!

dropkick
2008-03-15, 07:17
http://www.outdoorreview.com/Channels/OutdoorReview/images/products/product_79950.jpg
Neat tent - looks like a double wall version of Shires Rainbow
Back when I was sewing tents for myself I designed one that looked almost identical to that.

One support bent in a bow, held up by the 4 stakes in the corners of the tent.
Mine had doors in both sides.

Never built it though. I decided that my design wouldn't be very stable and I'd also have trouble keeping the rain out without an overhead tarp (my design was single wall). I went with a Baker tent instead.

Later I transfered to a homemade bivy bag (usually left open and used only as a ground cloth) and an overhead tarp.

Now I use a homemade hammock with an overhead 8x10 nylon tarp.

If I have a base camp I use canvas wall tent as it has lots of room and is easy to get around in. However it's heavy - I never take it far from a vehicle or a boat.

If I need to go to ground while hiking I could still take along my bivy, or even my baker tent.

But overall for shelter of choice I'll stick with my hammock for comfort, weight, comfort, ease of set up, and comfort.

vonfrick
2008-03-15, 21:30
BA Seedhouse SL1, it's snuggy. :sleep:

Take-a-knee
2008-03-16, 02:19
Yes, it was on the Bob and belonged to Capn who was with Radar.

My favorite tent was an old North Face A-frame called the Tuolumne and I have only two old faded fotogs of the thing. The first one isn't too good. Notice the old tunnel snow door and the top vent. Single pole in the back, A frame in the front. Got it in '78 and used it until '89. Discontinued by North Face of course and replaced with the Westwind.


I had a North Face Tuolumne I bought at Clem's Backpacking Sports in Fairbanks. I spent as much time as the army would allow in Denali Park and that tent never let me down and never leaked a drop. That tunnel door was a pain but zippers weren't reliable back then all serious tents had a tunnel opening then. I sold the tent to put tires on my truck at Ft Benning.

Rifleman
2008-03-16, 04:30
Shelter of choice is an 8x10 silnylon from Backcountry.com. Excellent coverage for my HH. Am considering going with a Jacks 8x8. Unfortunately it looks as if the Jacks have lost their host.
http://www.jacksrbetter.com/ "Bad Request (Invalid Hostname)"
R.

SowthEfrikan
2008-03-16, 10:50
Lately, my house, but when I am out on the trail it's usually my Tarptent, sometimes my Hennessy Hammock (if going out to the mountains to play) and occassionally my REI Roadster. REI discontinued the Roadster, a real shame.

Tipi Walter
2008-03-16, 23:45
My third tent and a new favorite was a Mountain Hardwear Muil Trail frog style a-frame. I got away from North Face after finding their best stuff to be whimsically discontinued for no apparent reason, but it turns out Mt Hardwear does the same dang thing as the Muir Trail is now in the history bin. This tent got me thru some mean blizzards and high winds.

GGS
2008-03-17, 00:21
I'm a newbie to backpacking and camping, relatively speaking, so most of what I have is store-bought low/medium cost solutions.

My favorite backpacking shelter is the Hennessy Hammock Expedition A-Sym. I'll use this when I expect weather to be 40 degrees or above. I'm totally comfy, and in areas with trees there is never a shortage of camping places. I tether the dogs to one of the tie-out trees, each has a small blue foam square to sleep on for ground insulation.
http://www.hennessyhammock.com/specs-expeditionasym.html

My favorite backpacking ground solution is an Eureka Zeus 2 Classic. (I need a 2 person tent to fit the dogs, equipment, and myself) Quick setup & includes a vestibule.
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat20075-cat20103&id=0045521517610a&navCount=5&podId=0045521&parentId=cat20103&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat20103&hasJS=true

For unheated winter camping I have a Cabela's Expedition XPG 4 Season tent. Heavy for its size and bulky to carry, it's more suitable for pulking or car camping.
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat20075-cat20103&rid=&indexId=cat20103&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=3&parentType=index&parentId=cat20103&id=0055294

For a heated shelter I have a Cabela's Alaknak II tent with woodburning stove. Easy for one person to set up. Way too heavy to backpack with, not sure if I'd even consider pulking that sucker, but great for car camping in cold weather
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=&rid=&indexId=cat550002&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=7&parentType=index&parentId=cat550002&id=0005884

My dream solution would be:
-Stick with my Hennessy for warm season backpacking
-Get a Kifaru Tipi with titanium stove (or similar solution big enough for myself and two dogs) for cold season pulk sledding

Tipi Walter
2008-03-17, 06:35
[QUOTE=GGS;24094]

For a heated shelter I have a Cabela's Alaknak II tent with woodburning stove. Easy for one person to set up. Way too heavy to backpack with, not sure if I'd even consider pulking that sucker, but great for car camping in cold weather
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=&rid=&indexId=cat550002&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=7&parentType=index&parentId=cat550002&id=0005884

It's funny you should mention the Alaknak as my current basecamp tent(where I sleep when I'm not out backpacking), is a Cabelas XTW Xtreme Weather Outfitter tent in the sama category as the Alaknak. Though not used with a woodstove (as there's not a flue vent), I have a propane Mr Heater stove which cuts the cold enough.

I'd like to try the Alaknak with a titanium stove from Four Dogs Stove but I wonder, what's the size of the flue hole in the Alaknak? And is the single wall on the Alaknak pretty durable and waterproof?

enviro
2008-03-17, 12:23
Hey Tipi Walter, that Westwind must be an old tent, there doesn't seem to be nearly as much grey in the hair or beard. Was that tent made of canvas? LOL:biggrin:

Tipi Walter
2008-03-17, 13:39
Hey Tipi Walter, that Westwind must be an old tent, there doesn't seem to be nearly as much grey in the hair or beard. Was that tent made of canvas? LOL:biggrin:

That picture was taken back in the 1830s when every tent was made from brain-tanned buffalo hide--heavy as heck but durable. Considering I've been camping since before the Civil War, I think I'm still looking pretty good.

warraghiyagey
2008-03-17, 13:44
I would actually love to find a nice lightweight tepee tent.

enviro
2008-03-17, 13:47
That picture was taken back in the 1830s when every tent was made from brain-tanned buffalo hide--heavy as heck but durable. Considering I've been camping since before the Civil War, I think I'm still looking pretty good.

Yeah considering all of that I think you are holding up very well. Bet it was harder to find those quite camp spots during the Civil War.

enviro
2008-03-17, 13:47
I would actually love to find a nice lightweight tepee tent.

Black Diamond Mega Light would be close to a tepee. Is there a difference in a wiki-up and a tepee?

Tipi Walter do you ever put together a sweat lodge?

GGS
2008-03-17, 16:19
I'd like to try the Alaknak with a titanium stove from Four Dogs Stove but I wonder, what's the size of the flue hole in the Alaknak? And is the single wall on the Alaknak pretty durable and waterproof?

It has a 5" stovepipe jack. Yes, material is very durable and waterproof IMO.

JRiker
2008-03-17, 16:40
i use an SD clip flashlight. nice and roomy. can fit two if we're really friendly (i.e. me and my wife) weights not too bad at 4 pounds. (i know that's a lot for you ULers but it's fine for me) sometimes when it's just me i'll take the fly for the tent with a bivy and use the stays from my pack to prop up the fly in a sort of A frame figuration.

Tipi Walter
2008-03-17, 16:56
Black Diamond Mega Light would be close to a tepee. Is there a difference in a wiki-up and a tepee?

Tipi Walter do you ever put together a sweat lodge?

I always considered a wikiup/wigwam to be as pictured, showing an ancient Indian villiage reproduction(Hillsborough, NC). Looks like a huge sweatlodge with bent saplings, "waddle" construction, etc.

In 2002-2003 I lived in a similar shelter made from saplings in a 14 foot diameter circle. Covered in canvas with a stove pipe flue out the side. I called it a Witu and it was at my Chickasaw Creek camp before the big Cabelas tent.

grannyhiker
2008-03-17, 19:17
Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo. It is just the right size for me, my pack and my dog. 26.0 oz. including seam sealing and stakes. It is built with the canopy well out away from the mesh lower walls, so there's no chance of rain splashing in or the netting getting pushed out into the wet as there is with a Tarptent. The mesh goes up high enough on the walls that it's basically impossible to brush against the possibly damp canopy walls in your sleep. I've had no condensation problems, even camping on the Olympic Peninsula coast.

I considered a hammock, but there are several problems. First, out here in the Pacific Northwest we have a lot of enormous trees, so a lot of rope is needed as well as more than one person to reach around some of the trees. Second, I do a lot of camping at or above timberline. Third, I wouldn't even want to contemplate trying to get my 80 lb. dog into a hammock! He's part of my sleep system, so putting him elsewhere is not an option.

GGS
2008-03-17, 22:01
It has a 5" stovepipe jack. Yes, material is very durable and waterproof IMO.

Alaknak II pictures

warraghiyagey
2008-03-17, 23:40
Black Diamond Mega Light would be close to a tepee. Is there a difference in a wiki-up and a tepee?

Tipi Walter do you ever put together a sweat lodge?

Thanks, I'm gonna look that up. Not sure of the differences yet of tepees but I'm working on it.
I'm definitely going to be building an authentic tipi and seat lodge when I get my little place in the Adirondacks.

Tipi Walter
2008-03-17, 23:52
Alaknak II pictures

Great fotogs! Who needs a house when you've got that baby! I think we found the solution to the mortage crisis. BTW, is that stove one from the Cabelas catalog? If the tent was set up permanently than any heavy cast iron stove would work, but being mobile I think would require something like you have. Foldable?

At my tipi I had a big heavy 140 pound iron Atlanta Stove Works stove, perfect once hauled up the one mile trail(actually, ROLLED UP the trail).

My Cabelas XTW tent has been set up for the last 3 years and it still hasn't sprung a leak or even has a mouse chew-hole, of course, I don't leave food laying around either. I've got a in-tent dog photo too, along with a buffalo skull altar . . .

Rifleman
2008-03-18, 00:27
JrB's back up. New home page too.
R.

Tipi Walter
2008-03-18, 00:40
Thanks, I'm gonna look that up. Not sure of the differences yet of tepees but I'm working on it.
I'm definitely going to be building an authentic tipi and seat lodge when I get my little place in the Adirondacks.


Not to get too involved, tipis generally use around 15-18 poles(pine usually), with 3 tied together as a base tripod(some are 4 poled tripods), with the others layed into the circle. The Lakota ceremonial lodges had 28 poles, a sacred number. A real tipi is a tilted cone, hard to figure but easy to see in action. One side is steeper than the other, the back is steeper and the front is longer and more gradual. Small point.

In the old days tipis were made from sewn together buffalo hides and they were smaller before the days of canvas. The typical canvas tipi of today is around 16 feet in diameter, a pretty good size and keeps the poles small enough to transport on a car roof.

Some tipi lovers want a large hourglass effect, with the exposed poles reaching high above the canvas to the sky. Other people don't care just as long as the lodge gets set up right with the smoke hole working.

A tipi must be used with a canvas liner attached to the inside poles. This offers a chimney effect for the outside air to come up and pull the woodsmoke out thru the top smoke hole. Smoke flaps on the outside of the hole direct the wind away from the smoke exit.

Nomadics Tipis are probably the best known commercial lodges, but there are many others like Reese and individual makers like Darry Wood, etc. His lodges were at one time considered the best. The first fotog shows a Darry Wood tipi set up in NC.

GGS
2008-03-18, 00:58
Thanks, I'm gonna look that up. Not sure of the differences yet of tepees but I'm working on it.
I'm definitely going to be building an authentic tipi and seat lodge when I get my little place in the Adirondacks.

Might want to check out the GoLite Shangri-La (Formerly the Go-Lite Hex 3) as well

http://www.golite.com/Product/proddetail.aspx?p=SH6125&s=1

warraghiyagey
2008-03-18, 00:58
Not to get too involved, tipis generally use around 15-18 poles(pine usually), with 3 tied together as a base tripod(some are 4 poled tripods), with the others layed into the circle. The Lakota ceremonial lodges had 28 poles, a sacred number. A real tipi is a tilted cone, hard to figure but easy to see in action. One side is steeper than the other, the back is steeper and the front is longer and more gradual. Small point.

In the old days tipis were made from sewn together buffalo hides and they were smaller before the days of canvas.


TW- thanks so much for that really good info. I think that gives me enough to go on and your description of the Lakota Tipi is word perfect to the desctription Mary Crow Dog gave in her autobiography 'Lakota Girl.'
Any good sweat lodge descriptions off the top of your head??
Thanks again.
:beer:

warraghiyagey
2008-03-18, 00:59
Might want to check out the GoLite Shangri-La (Formerly the Go-Lite Hex 3) as well

http://www.golite.com/Product/proddetail.aspx?p=SH6125&s=1

Thanks GGS.

GGS
2008-03-18, 02:12
Great fotogs! Who needs a house when you've got that baby! I think we found the solution to the mortage crisis. BTW, is that stove one from the Cabelas catalog? If the tent was set up permanently than any heavy cast iron stove would work, but being mobile I think would require something like you have. Foldable?

Yes it is, it is the Outfitter stove kit. See first picture below. At the time I bought the tent this stove, stovepipe, damper, and spark arrestor could be had for an additional $49. The stove is not foldable (the legs will fold against the stove but that's it) and is pretty cheaply built. The door doesn't close well, the sliding draft jams once the stove is heated, smoke rolls out of the front when you open to stoke the fire, and it is not airtight. But hey for $49 it works. It also has a bottom grate and ash pan so you don't have to line the bottom with sand which is nice.

I also own a Sheepherder Packer stove (smallest stove in the pic on the right) which I really like. Airtight and well designed draft. This is the most lightweight although note the smaller 8x10x23 firebox can limit your heat output when using less than ideal wood and you need the wood split to the proper size for best useage. I've used it in single digit temps and had to push the stove (glowing spots) to warm the tent to t-shirt & shorts temps. I love it for 20 degree and up temps. A better stove IMO is the Sheepherder Alaskan stove, same excellent design and the 12x12x24 firebox will accept smaller split cordwood with ease and throw out more heat. These two stoves have folding legs but otherwise are not foldable.

Of course if you're talking about using a cast iron stove you're in a category all to yourself... :adore:

Another thought. I have the smallest Alaknak (9.5'x9.5') which has 3' sidewalls. If you're looking at a stove that stands taller than the Sheepherder Alaskan stove you're going to be mighty close to the top of the tent, a concern with a bigger stove that throws out more heat. Better to use such a stove in the 12x12 Alaknak (4' sidewalls) or the 12x20 Alaknak (5' sidewalls)

GGS
2008-03-18, 02:14
Duh, let's include the pics. Outfitter on left, Sheepherder series on right

GGS2
2008-03-18, 02:56
Tipi, what's with all the plains stuff? You come from out there, or just like that vibe? Tipis were mobile homes. I imagine the local guys used something a bit more permanent. Lodges of some sort. I've known the people around here, onyata:aka, to use tipis for temporary ceremonies, but they sure didn't use them back in the day. Then they built long house lodges covered in bark. Ever tried one of those?

Tipi Walter
2008-03-18, 09:28
Tipi, what's with all the plains stuff? You come from out there, or just like that vibe? Tipis were mobile homes. I imagine the local guys used something a bit more permanent. Lodges of some sort. I've known the people around here, onyata:aka, to use tipis for temporary ceremonies, but they sure didn't use them back in the day. Then they built long house lodges covered in bark. Ever tried one of those?

I was raised in Oklahoma but my heart's with the northern plains and the tipi Indians like the Lakota Sioux, Blackfeet, Crow and Cheyenne. A person can make a canvas tipi into a permanent home and there's quality canvas now on the market that will last past the usual accepted 5 year mark. Eustace Conway, Johnny B and others have lived in canvas tipis for years so it can be done.

I configured my ridgetop tipi in NC to be near permanent but altered the usual design by using 20 locust poles and 20 poplar poles for strength and longevity. I capped off the top hole with canvas and ran the stovepipe out the enlarged door. I lived in this tipi or one like it for about 21 years.

Since I was on top of a windy high mountain ridge, I built a leaf berm around the circumference of the lodge using chicken wire and dead leaves. Good insulation and an excellent wind block. The outside poles weighed down the tarps and kept things from blowing away.

GGS2
2008-03-18, 16:58
I was raised in Oklahoma but my heart's with the northern plains and the tipi Indians like the Lakota Sioux, Blackfeet, Crow and Cheyenne.

Cool. That explains it, alright. Kinda a mixture of everything. Back to the homeland, too. Nice pix, too.

warraghiyagey
2008-03-18, 22:15
Tipi, what's with all the plains stuff? You come from out there, or just like that vibe? Tipis were mobile homes. I imagine the local guys used something a bit more permanent. Lodges of some sort. I've known the people around here, onyata:aka, to use tipis for temporary ceremonies, but they sure didn't use them back in the day. Then they built long house lodges covered in bark. Ever tried one of those?

Additionally, through the ages the plains indians (local guys) did use more permanent dwellings to some degree, (mostly lodges - longhouses weren't so poplular outside the Iroquois region), mostly in there winter settings. But they also taveled with and lived in their tipis the majority of the year and set up their tipis around their longhouses and lodges when they wintered.
They were all regionally nomadic, only in the sense that they traveled for seasonal food and hunts and then hunkered down in areas that they had learned to survive the winter.

enviro
2008-03-18, 22:36
Tipi Waler I asked about the sweat lodge,because I have only had the opportinity to participate in 1. It felt to me a magical/mystical experience. Very hard to type into words. Seems the type of thing that you have to be in the right frame of mind to appreciate.

Mine was during the winter with snow on the ground. When we finished the lodge we were able to go out of the lodge and rub with snow.

Something that I would certainly like to experience again. I'm up for helping to build another and I have a couple of good friends that took me to the 1 that I was allowed to participate in.

Is this a possibility that you would be interested in? Warrghey when will you be in the NC/TN area. That would be a nice break Huh?

warraghiyagey
2008-03-19, 01:40
Tipi Waler I asked about the sweat lodge,because I have only had the opportinity to participate in 1. It felt to me a magical/mystical experience. Very hard to type into words. Seems the type of thing that you have to be in the right frame of mind to appreciate.

Mine was during the winter with snow on the ground. When we finished the lodge we were able to go out of the lodge and rub with snow.

Something that I would certainly like to experience again. I'm up for helping to build another and I have a couple of good friends that took me to the 1 that I was allowed to participate in.

Is this a possibility that you would be interested in? Warrghey when will you be in the NC/TN area. That would be a nice break Huh?

I had a friend this summer that had a sweat lodge experience and echoed nearly verbatim along iwth other friends I've heard from your sentiments about the sweat lodge experience. For sure I will build one when I find find myself in that space.
I'm thinking I'll be in the NC/TN area in the middle of October, and you bet, it will be a great break. Somewhere between here, WB and my trailjournals we'll make a good few days of it!
Peace E.D. (:biggrin: )
Thanks.

Seeker
2008-03-19, 22:29
my shelter of choice is a Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym. i like it for a couple reasons.

comfort is probably the top one. my back is old, and gets grouchy if i sleep on anything hard. it takes about 3'' of mattress to be soft enough. that means a lot of weight, and i've never found a comfortable portable mattress/sleeping pad, even double-stacked thermarests. with the hammock, i sleep like a rock with a minimum of tossing or turning. fall asleep, wake up 8 hours later. very nice.

the 2nd reason is "weather-proofness', if that's a word. i've accidentally camped in low spots while in a tent or under a tarp, and been flooded out. doesn't matter how hard it rains, i'm going to be safe and dry.

the 3rd reason is weight. by the time you add the sleeping pad i'd need and any tent, the hammock comes off at least dead even with it, if not lighter. and that leads to:

the 4th reason is convenience. tie it up at one end, tie it up at the other end, unroll the snakeskins, and you are under shelter. a little more fiddling and the 2 corners are tied out and you have even more room. you don't need to find a level spot, or an open clearing. any place with trees will do. i can literally camp in a swamp, climbing up into cypress trees from a boat, sling my hammock, and sleep dry and warm (just make sure to tie that boat up REAL tight.)

i have 2 tarps that i use, going back to weatherproofness. one is the stock diamond, which i love for its convenience and light weight (7oz). the other is a homemade 8 x 10 that wieghs about 18oz or so. when i know it's going to pour, or if i'm going with company, i bring the big one. if i'm solo and know that there's only 'light rain' in the forecast, i'll bring the stock tarp. i've slept out in some real downpours using the stock tarp, and it works fine. but the issue is more the next morning... it's nice to have a slightly larger workspace to cook and pack up in, or to lounge under if you're in one place for a couple days.

Swingo
2008-03-20, 00:01
One thing about hammocks: your camp is just a hammock. With a tent you have a little house, a real sense of a "camp". You just don't get that sense with a hammock. At least I don't. Really love that Alanak II, wish it wasn't so expensive!

dropkick
2008-03-20, 00:52
But the second thing about hammocks is that when you wake up well rested in the morning you feel good. Unlike many ground sleepers who hobble around in the morning grunting and groaning looking like a 150 year old with back problems.

I'll take that trade over having a traditional looking campsite (and why worry what it looks like if it's for just overnight?)

If I'm going to be in an area for more than one night I'm going to set up a more involved campsite. Tarp over my eating area, etc.

Frolicking Dino
2008-03-20, 16:11
Good point, Dropkick. The size of a hammock tarp gives you a lot of daytime options.

dropkick
2008-03-20, 23:51
I actually also carry 2 plastic painters tarps (and some string for guy lines), to use as extra rain tarps.
They're lightweight, take up very little room, and cover a fairly large area when unfolded.
The only problem I have with them is that they aren't real strong, and a good wind can rip them lose from the guy lines.
But they also cost very little, so it's a trade off.

enviro
2008-03-21, 00:08
Unless the wind is really strong, it's raining very hard and the tarps break loose. That's a bad trade off at that point.

I realize most of us have budget considerations, but the most important factors (life threatning) is to stay dry and warm, especially dry. Spend your money according to that. Make sure you have dry shelter, good raingear, your belongings in your pack are dry. Weight is secondary.

If you have the expertise and/or money to do both, go for it. But don't sacrifice security for weight.

Iceman
2008-03-22, 12:22
Definitely a tent. Out here in the rainforest, I find the need to have space to "hang out in" if the weather gets rainy... Also for the ability to lay on the tent floor while cooking in a vestibule if wet...

I have a bunch of tents, for various group sizes and situations. Love Eureka tents...

Tipi Walter
2008-03-23, 15:12
My girlfriend Little Mitten and I used a couple of larger tents for our backpacking trips. The first was a yellow Iron Mountain dome/wedge which I used with her and also set up as a basecamp tent before building my Witu canvas lodge.

The other tent we used was a Mt Hardwear Hammerhead 3 tent, a fine large shelter for two. The last fotog shows the Hammerhead in the background at a favorite Pisgah backpacking destination: Upper Creek by the Mountains to Sea and Greentown trails.

FireFighter56
2008-03-24, 00:05
i'v had many tents over the years some of my favs i had were hand-me-downs...had this old canvas tent could sleep 8 ppl used it for car camping...after years of use she died :P
and my old side wall OD green i had since i was a kid...has a few duct tap patcheson it...but still kicking....my buddy uses it now...i gave it to him ...and he loves it....i now have a Ozark trail tent...an older one...and 2 storage areas u can get to from the inside or the outside...and never leaked not once....and it's bin in the ....u know what of rain storms...as for backpacking i was using a Byer hammock and a nylon tarp.....but since running into srg rocks WP and reading up on HH i just got my first HH the explorer a-syn....played around with it in the yard...this week hope to test it out over night.....got a few ideas for keeping my butt warm....so if the frist idea don't work onto the next....so far i really like the HH ....i'll let ya know this week how i slept lol

Tipi Walter
2008-03-26, 16:04
Here are a few other tents I used before I got into the Hilleberg line of shelters. The first two show a single-wall Mt Hardwear Mountain Jet wedge tent set up in Bald River wilderness and atop Whiggs Meadow.

The next two show another Mt Hardwear tent, this time the Light Wedge 2, a fine 3 season w/ mesh wedge tent, carried often until one of the poles broke(and fixed with the poles from my old yellow Iron Mountain tent).

FireFighter56
2008-03-27, 02:17
looks like a great tent.....but i'll stick with the HH....

peter_pan
2008-03-27, 18:11
Shelter of choice is an 8x10 silnylon from Backcountry.com. Excellent coverage for my HH. Am considering going with a Jacks 8x8. Unfortunately it looks as if the Jacks have lost their host.
http://www.jacksrbetter.com/ "Bad Request (Invalid Hostname)"
R.

Rifleman,

BTW, there is a killer sale going on on that 8x8 tarp at present... $ 50.

Pan

Frolicking Dino
2008-03-27, 19:08
We Dinos have gone ultralight and now use Antigravity Gear's 10' Brawny tarptent (http://www.antigravitygear.com/proddetail.php?prod=AGTTTP10) (the old Brawny tarp with a floor). The tent plus pole and stakes weighs 23 ozs, 42" peak height and has 38.25 sq ft plus 18 sq ft in the vestibule. We use one of our silnylon ponchos (http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=999634) (our rain gear and pack cover - 9.5 ozs) instead of the provided vestibule to save 3.1 ozs (weight saving included in weight mentioned) Pack size is 6" x 9" plus three 14" tent pole sections.

Our reasons for going this route - weight savings obviously, but also gives us enough space to keep gear inside and has room to cook on the covered porch (vestibule deployed as a porch) in the rain. It is enclosed enough that he-dino feels safe (he just has to have an enclosed area to sleep). The design is such that she-dino doesn't get claustrophobia inside - a real problem with some of the ultralight options. In really rainy weather we also carry a large silnylon tarp (10' x 12' - 19 ozs) That is not an ultralight option, but it is certainly really nice to have tons of dry space in a rainstorm and to have a dry place out of the wind for rest stops - lunch.

We have tried a lot of options - hammocks, tarp plus bivy, regular tents - and this combo seems to fit our needs.The dinos just returned from a backpacking trip and Brawny will be going on sell soon. It fell down on the Dinos three times in one night -- we ended up using the 10' x 12' tarp the whole time - massive amount of space for two Dinos and gear. He-Dino may be converted to tarps after all.

dixicritter
2008-03-27, 20:30
The dinos just returned from a backpacking trip and Brawny will be going on sell soon. It fell down on the Dinos three times in one night -- we ended up using the 10' x 12' tarp the whole time - massive amount of space for two Dinos and gear. He-Dino may be converted to tarps after all.

Oh no! Another good reason to hammock camp. ;):ahhhhh:

Frolicking Dino
2008-03-27, 23:41
It was even better than it just fell on us - Imagine a fluffy dino wrapped in an Exped Wallcreeper that barely fits the fluffy dino these days and tangled in the bugnet because the top half of the BA pad slid completely out of the slippery silnylon tent - and then the dino takes out the pole trying to get out of wallcreeper and bugnet..... and then she gets the tent back up and pulls two stakes loose trying to get back in while wearing the wallcreeper so she won't knock the tent down when the pad slides out from under her as she tries to get back in the bag and then she takes out the pole again when she sits up to get the stakes back in place....

10' x 12' tarps are a beautiful thing - the stakes stay put... I tied the ridge line support to a tree (no pole or bugnet in the doorway - A door large enough not to require you be a skinny contortionist to enter. Held up all night long in serious wind (10 to 20 continuous with gust up to 30 MPH) and kept the wind off the dinos.

enviro
2008-03-28, 02:26
LOL, just note I'm laughing with you not at you.:laugh:

Turk
2008-04-02, 01:40
One thing about hammocks: your camp is just a hammock. With a tent you have a little house, a real sense of a "camp". You just don't get that sense with a hammock. At least I don't. Really love that Alanak II, wish it wasn't so expensive!

I beg to differ. My winter hammock, IS a house.
http://www.ehko.info/gear_rev_jrbht.html

We added a large addition off the front during my Feb hike. Seen
in my recent vid. here:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=YKisOFOgn-E

warraghiyagey
2008-04-02, 01:57
Dino's are weird.

:ahhhhh:

Frolicking Dino
2008-04-03, 00:24
I saw where it has been proven that Warraghies don't exist. :bootyshak

warraghiyagey
2008-04-03, 00:42
Not yet proven. I'm just lagging (badly) in the polls.

:bike:

mark o. david
2008-04-16, 00:22
I haven't actually settled on which shelter I'm satisfied with yet honestly, but I know it will be a hammock of some type.

So far I've tried the Hennesey Desert Rat, which I thought slept just fine. The only problem I had was I felt claustrophobic in it. Nothing against the hammock itself really just my own problem. LOL.

I have now made a top loader that I'm mostly satisfied with. I'll just have to figure out how to use bug netting with it during the bug season. Minor issue. :)

The JRB guys sent me one of their Bridge hammocks to test out. I'm excited about trying this one. Even though it will weigh a little more than my homemade one I think that I might just like the fact that it won't close in around me like the traditional hammocks do. They tend to put my body in positions that don't allow me to get a whole lot of sleep. (I swear I'm going to get that hammock set up soon guys. Thanks again!!! Y'all are the greatest!!!)

So in answer to your question FD... I'm undecided at the moment other than to say a hammock of some variety... but I'm thinking it may end up being the JRB Bridge when all is said and done. :) Take a look at the "Kayaker" www.deckhandman.com this is a utility hammock with a rain/sun cover option,tell me what you think/Mark

dixicritter
2008-04-16, 08:00
Take a look at the "Kayaker" www.deckhandman.com this is a utility hammock with a rain/sun cover option,tell me what you think/Mark

Well this is what the Hennesy Desert Rat looks like. It comes complete with tarp, bug netting and it weighs in at 2 lbs 10 ozs according to the site...

http://www.hennessyhammock.com/images/Desert%20tan.jpg

This is a JRB Bridge hammock and weighs in at around 33 ozs according to their site. This one does not include a tarp however it does come with the bug netting and spreader bars...

http://www.jacksrbetter.com/index_files/DSC00256%20-%20Bear%20Mountain%20Bridge%20Hammock%20-%20web%20sm.JPG

For the price I probably wouldn't purchase the one you pointed to, as it wouldn't fit my needs. I just don't see myself staying warm in that honestly, and I have to stay warm or my joints are not happy with me.

Here's a picture of the Kayaker...

http://www.deckhandman.com/images/kayaker_250.jpg

CaSteve
2008-04-16, 23:11
Here's a picture of the Kayaker...

http://www.deckhandman.com/images/kayaker_250.jpg

Wow, that looks like a real mattress in that hammock. What's the weight on that?

Tipi Walter
2008-04-17, 09:59
My current shelter obsession revolves around the Hilleberg line of tents, specifically the Nammatj 3 and the dome Staika. I always wanted to live in a tunnel tent so I got the Nammatj which accompanied me on several backpacking trips.

Later I got a 3 pole dome Staika which is my most favorite tent of all time and has been with me on over a hundred nights of camping.

Nammatj in Bald River Wilderness.
Nammatj at Iron Camp, South Fork Citico.
Staika on South Fork Citico.
Staika at Naked Ground, Slickrock.

innermountain
2008-04-22, 13:07
I wanted to throw in a quick, lightweight shelter option for winter camping and mountaineering that is absolutely awesome. We use it in Yellowstone and the Rockies (http://www.wildlandtrekking.com). We use a Black Diamond Megamid (for 3 people) or a Betamid (for 2 people). We dig down into the snow pack about 2 feet deep, 8 feet wide, and 7 feet long. The shelters are lightweight tarps that we set up on ski poles joined together. It's also roomy and super cozy. Not good above treeline.

Let me know if anyone wants to know more about it.

Cheers,

Scott