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wahoo
2008-04-29, 22:39
Hopefully, everyone has seen this movie by now. Directed by Sean Penn, this movie tells the story of Christopher McCandless and his journey to Alaska.

From IMDB:
"After graduating from Emory University, top student and athlete Christopher McCandless abandons his possessions, gives his entire $24,000 savings account to charity and hitchhikes to Alaska to live in the wilderness. Along the way, Christopher encounters a series of characters that shape his life."

lucky luke
2008-04-30, 01:02
Hopefully, everyone has seen this movie by now. ....

hi,

why? what makes it so special that its worth wasting (spending?) money (app 10 US$ here in germany) and time ( app. 2.5 hrs getting there and back plus movie)? i´ld rather spend 2 hrs outdoors with my dog or son.

greets
lucky luke

Geo.
2008-04-30, 18:40
hi,

why? what makes it so special that its worth wasting (spending?) money (app 10 US$ here in germany) and time ( app. 2.5 hrs getting there and back plus movie)?

S'pose you could look at it as a graphic example of a training film on how not to prepare for a stay in the wilderness! ;)
Geo.

lucky luke
2008-05-01, 06:05
S'pose you could look at it as a graphic example of a training film on how not to prepare for a stay in the wilderness! ;)
Geo.

hi geo,

neither jon krakauer nor hollywood are examples i want to learn from. guess i´ld rather book a class of wilderness survival or something on edible plants instead.

however my ex-wife enjoyed the movie....

happy trails
lucky luke

JRiker
2008-05-01, 07:47
everyone posting seems to not get this movie. i was originally dissapointed by this movie because it's not about hiking and camping like i thought. it's about a guy that decides to become a bum (basically).

all that aside, if you look at the movie as an inspirational and about a guy who had a messed up life, and not as a survival/hiking movie, i'd say it's pretty good.


at the very least, it should remind all people who watch it to be wary of what wild foods they eat.

wahoo
2008-05-01, 15:38
Geez, it's just a decent movie. No need to over analyze it there, Geo.
Go on outside and play with your son and dog.
It's got some great Alaskan scenery, however. Sure, Christoper McCandless has a lot of problems and took his journey to the extreme, but most of us that hike and spend time outdoors are looking for an escape as well on some level.

I guess you can go up to that schoolbus that he spent all that time in too. That'd be sorta creepy...

Geo.
2008-05-01, 18:51
Geez, it's just a decent movie. No need to over analyze it there, Geo.
Go on outside and play with your son and dog.


Hi Wahoo,
Didn't think I was over analyzing - and I don't have a dog - could this be mistaken ID! ;)

Regardless of what I think about McCandless's preparation, I agree that it was a decent movie entertainment-wise. My one gripe (saying as this was a 'true' story) was that the scene that depicted him shooting those rapids never actually happened - he did paddle some of that river, but put in below the rapids. But I guess that's Hollywood.

Nearly Normal
2008-05-01, 22:46
Just re-read the book.
Difficult to see such a waste.
I've heard the movie has a slant, but I thought the book did also.
The author goes out his way to rationalize crazy actions like not carrying a map. Hero worship maybe.
Had he lived, he would have learned, even if the hard way.

wahoo
2008-05-02, 09:45
Whoops, my bad Geo. I meant the post by Lucky Luke. Apologies..!

Yea, It was a sensationalized movie, like most Hollywood productions. There's no way he could have took on that whitewater.

Here's a link to some dudes who went out to the bus:
http://liventhedreaminalaska.blogspot.com/2007/11/taken-trip-out-to-magic-bus.html

Turk
2008-05-02, 19:14
I enjoyed both the film and the book. Particularly riding the trains, and the over -the-top romanticized hobo lifestyle. There are only a small handfull of rail systems left here in canada where one can actually ride an open box car legally. Having done so many times myself, both legally and otherwise, over great distances, I enjoyed that aspect of the film. Of course I have a much skewed and biased view of that lifestyle, as I am gainfully employed, and have a wonderful life and family, and only get to escape into my fantasy hobo alter ego a few times per year.

Still ... every time I am jammed in late afternoon traffic at a rail crossing, I can't help but scan every box car that goes by for the telltale signs and symbols of real hobos, and pseudo-part-timers like myself, and sigh wistfully.

When my daughter is off to college, my wife has agreed to travel together on the rails into the northern wilderness as a pair of psuedo-hobos... even if only for a few months. Having better equipment, and ample money helps maintain the romantic fantasy of it.


also. the soundtrack to the film by Eddie Vedder is imho brilliant and deeply moving.

flemdawg1
2008-05-08, 15:47
Mildly disappointed. Chris' character seemed too emotionally stunted. And his journey seemed too much of a collection of experiences w/out any real emotional growth until the end. The original Outside article was more moving than the movie to me.

DBTfan
2008-06-16, 01:21
I enjoyed the movie more than the book but the book seemed to give a better status of the mind of Chris McCandless. The actor did a fine job with the role of CM. Read the book first & then see the movie.

lucky luke
2008-08-26, 14:53
Whoops, my bad Geo. I meant the post by Lucky Luke. Apologies..!

Yea, It was a sensationalized movie, like most Hollywood productions. There's no way he could have took on that whitewater.

Here's a link to some dudes who went out to the bus:
http://liventhedreaminalaska.blogspot.com/2007/11/taken-trip-out-to-magic-bus.html

hi,

well i got to watch the movie on a rainy night at my girlfriends home...

i must say it was much better than i expected it to be. not a movie to learn the outdoors, but a pretty good study of what may have driven alexander supertramp to find his edge and walk it for a while. pretty good i admit, no waste of time at all - after all.

one question. are all those naked people in the us-version? i guess its x-rated then:biggrin:

happy trails
lucky luke

Ice Age
2008-08-26, 15:04
Chris McCandless' life doesn't deserve the attention a book and movie have given it. Whoop-de-doo, he was a bum that made it so far "Into The Wild" that there was a BUS already there, not my picture of a wilderness, but there you go. And then he died because he was a moron.

See, I just wrapped up his life in 2 sentences, no book or movie necessary.

Tipi Walter
2008-08-26, 20:46
My biggest problem with the movie? HE NEVER WORE HIS BACKPACK WITH THE HIPBELT CONNECTED!! I guess Sean Penn never used a technical adviser for the movie. And the pack itself? Was it an old Jansport model? And they cleverly blocked out the brand tag sewn on the back of the pack in the beginning, another mistake.

But the rest of the movie really hit home for me and for several of my hitchhiking, dumpster-diving, homeless-but-living-out-of-a-pack friends. Our stories are bumhood stories similar to his, adventure sagas about tents and tarps, rainbow hippies and leaky thermarests. He tried to live on nearly nothing and be happy doing it, sort of like the admonition to think not of the 'morrow and to not worry about where we'll sleep or what we'll eat. Something called Faith. We loved the freedom and partly justified it with scriptures from the Bible.

In India they have wandering sadhus and swamis who beg for food and sleep under trees, owning nothing. And here we have a tradition of the christian renunciate giving up everything, even money, and following Jesus. We were close to the ideal and even tried to meditate daily, but like Chris we carried decent gear for the rain and the winter snows.

What INTO THE WILD brings up for me is how someone trying to live the christian ideal, at least partially, of giving up everything, can be so quickly labeled a loser and a bum. But then again, if we look at our country's materialism and consumerism and how it relates to the christian ideals of poverty and celibacy. it's no wonder there's a disconnect and software glitch in the old motherboard.

D'Artagnan
2008-08-26, 23:37
I enjoyed the treatment in Outside, the book, and the film. I felt a connection to Alex/Chris and empathized with this state of mind. He probably lived more in those couple of years than most sheeple do in a lifetime. It's disappointing to me so few seem to recognize his journey is one we all take but most to a much lesser degree. I mourn his passing but celebrate his message.

camojack
2008-08-27, 07:50
...he died because he was a moron.
See, I just wrapped up his life in 2 sentences, no book or movie necessary.
I'd say your sentence in bold was summary enough... :hmmmm:

Lone Wolf
2008-08-27, 08:53
Hopefully, everyone has seen this movie by now.


why? what's so friggin great about it? :boring:

Ice Age
2008-08-27, 10:16
Yeah, I've done the broke wanderer gig, it ain't all it's cracked up to be. Most of the time you are standing outside of a restaurant thinking "I wish I had $3 to buy some soup."

Please enlighten me on the "message" Mr. Supertramp provided us. Was it "go completely unprepared into an unfamiliar environment and die"? Because that's what I get.

camojack
2008-08-27, 10:34
Please enlighten me on the "message" Mr. Supertramp provided us. Was it "go completely unprepared into an unfamiliar environment and die"?
That's pretty much it... :vollkomme

BigJohn
2008-08-27, 13:02
I've done the broke wanderer gig, it ain't all it's cracked up to be. Most of the time you are standing outside of a restaurant thinking "I wish I had $3 to buy some soup."

I think this is the REAL point of the movie. I didn't come away from the movie feeling it was meant to glorify his lifestyle, but rather it was an admonition.

Most people initially went to go see the movie because they themselves have already sensationalized the "outdoorsman lifestyle." The movie didn't really have to sensationalize anything because the popular perception is already there.

What the movie really tries to show is that this kind of lifestyle is unrealistic in our current understanding of the world. Like Turk said, he's got a family, a job, and a career. That is the only way he can support his "pseudo hobo" part-time fantasies. Otherwise he's just a bum in a boxcar.

As westerners, we are all far removed from our hunting and gathering ancestors. That's why we carry shelter, food, fire, light etc. on our backs because we essentially don't have the skills (I don't care who you are or what knowledge you claim to have. Hunting and gathering tribes currently living in Papua New Guinea regularly collect more than 187 distinct species of plants in their environment, and they know how to use them. That number probably doesn't include all of the plants that they actually know (see Jared Diamond's book Guns, Germs, and Steel) That knowledge rivals any botanist with a P.h.d.) And I'm pretty damn sure that H&G Native Americans would have been little interested in traipsing aimlessly around the globe. They were just trying to survive.

We, outside of our normal 9 to 5 jobs, caring for children, making house and car payments, going to school, living within an artificial state apparatus, living as consumers in a capitalist nation, and living within a region that discourages living out from the rest of society, just don't have the time or the resources to possess that essential knowledge of correctly living as true "outdoorsmen." Maybe one hundred and fifty years ago, this may have been possible.

Therefore, in this context, the movie is an excellent warning against being trapped by an unhealthy romanticism.

Ice Age
2008-08-27, 13:19
You make some good points there Big John.

I do still think the book should have been called "Into the Bus", though :D

Jager
2008-08-27, 19:46
Unfortunately, this kid, and the movie romanticizing him will probably cost more lives at some point:



Alaskan Park Ranger Peter Christian wrote: “I am exposed continually to what I will call the ‘McCandless Phenomenon.’ People, nearly always young men, come to Alaska to challenge themselves against an unforgiving wilderness landscape where convenience of access and possibility of rescue are practically nonexistent […] When you consider McCandless from my perspective, you quickly see that what he did wasn’t even particularly daring, just stupid, tragic, and inconsiderate. First off, he spent very little time learning how to actually live in the wild. He arrived at the Stampede Trail without even a map of the area. If he [had] had a good map he could have walked out of his predicament […] Essentially, Chris McCandless committed suicide.”[18]

-From Wikipedia entry for Chris McCandless


Regards,
J.

Tipi Walter
2008-08-27, 22:05
Unfortunately, this kid, and the movie romanticizing him will probably cost more lives at some point:




-From Wikipedia entry for Chris McCandless


Regards,
J.

I'm sure all the dead mountain climbers could be classified as participating in the "McCandless Phenomenon". Mostly young men wanting to challenge themselves in a tough landscape. Didn't just 10 or 11 die on K2? And didn't more die in Europe? I'd say BigJohn has it right when he says most of us are currently living within an artificial state apparatus. More of a reason for a disgruntled few to pack it in and hit the woods.

But really, the movie is not about survival techniques or hunting and gathering or hobo rail-riding or hitchhiking or hippie dumpster-divers or Alaskan backpackers. Like most movies, it's a story about characters and people. The Hal Holbrook character in particular and his interaction with Chris was in my mind the climax of the movie. If I wanted a movie to inspire me to backpack and camp it sure wouldn't be INTO THE WILD. I'd pull out JEREMIAH JOHNSON before a big winter trip and be greasing my boots down as Redford says, "Del, I've been to a town."

BigJohn
2008-08-27, 22:20
Like most movies, it's a story about characters and people. The Hal Holbrook character in particular and his interaction with Chris was in my mind the climax of the movie.

Exactly, chasing a ideology at the expense of human interaction. He sacrifices everyone (as well as himself) for an ideal. That's why its a warning.

Jager
2008-08-27, 23:34
I'm sure all the dead mountain climbers could be classified as participating in the "McCandless Phenomenon". Mostly young men wanting to challenge themselves in a tough landscape. Didn't just 10 or 11 die on K2?

Nope. Those guys are prepared, trained, and experienced. The nature of their extreme (and to my mind, stupid ) sport leads to the deaths. The phenomenon the ranger is commenting on is an entirely different thing. That of ill-prepared idealists trying to 'find themselves' in the wilderness by emulating McCandless...


Regards,
J.

Tipi Walter
2008-08-28, 01:05
Nope. Those guys are prepared, trained, and experienced. The nature of their extreme (and to my mind, stupid ) sport leads to the deaths. The phenomenon the ranger is commenting on is an entirely different thing. That of ill-prepared idealists trying to 'find themselves' in the wilderness by emulating McCandless...


Regards,
J.

Prepared, trained and experienced? I think a rereading of INTO THIN AIR should be done. There were many people who didn't belong on that mountain that day in May. And the really experienced and prepared mountaineers know when to call it quits and shut off the voice of summit fever. But whether it's a McCandless type or a Messner wannabe, it all still results in Forest Rangers pulling out dead bodies. And until some Tent Police put up boundary markers reading KEEP OUT EVERYONE, the outdoors and wilderness will always offer risk and the opportunity to die. This is one of the attributes of wilderness.

Some 20 year olds drink and drive and die. Some go out on hunting trips and get accidentally shot. Some make a mistake and catch a disease and die. And like a car wreck, the McCandless debacle was an accident waiting to happen: No map, the river became impassable, the wild edibles not really edible. A series of mistakes, like driving too fast and flying off the road and killing all on board. The only difference between his accident and a car wreck is that it happened where some of us hike and backpack, it happened in the great outdoors, and we think he was stump stupid to let such a thing happen.

But anyone who spends enough time outdoors will encounter close calls, mini-epics and full blown survival mishaps. And in the final analysis, Nature is gonna kill all of us, whether from a lightning strike or a falling tree or a blood clot or a tumor or a heart attack. McCandless crossed a creek that later could not be easily recrossed. He didn't have a map, etc, but who among us hasn't been lost in the woods or nearly stepped on a rattlesnake or almost fell off a cliff or had a nearby tree almost hit our tent? Who hasn't gotten hypothermia in the winter when it's raining and you're trying to set up a tent? Who hasn't barely made it across a swollen river? Or got stung by a bunch of yellow jackets and luckily our throats didn't swell shut? Even the best of the outdoor types get snuffed.

Jager
2008-08-28, 09:58
Prepared, trained and experienced? I think a rereading of INTO THIN AIR should be done. There were many people who didn't belong on that mountain that day in May.

Absolutely. Shamefully, they were (and are) aided by people who should know better, but let the money talk. Again, though, a different case than McCandless.


we think he was stump stupid to let such a thing happen.

Agreed!


But anyone who spends enough time outdoors will encounter close calls, mini-epics and full blown survival mishaps.

Again, I agree.


And in the final analysis, Nature is gonna kill all of us,
Even the best of the outdoor types get snuffed.

Possibly, bad luck happens to everyone. But the difference between you and me, and some McCandless/Jeremiah Johnson wannabe is that we have the experience to avoid getting into that sort of situation in the first place, and the tools to give us better odds when luck does turn bad. I just think the romanticization of his story is a bad example.

Regards,
J.

JRiker
2008-09-04, 12:02
good flick if you like hippies (sorry if that offends anyone)
bad flick if you think it can teach you something about the outdoors.

don't eat food you're not sure of! (That was probably the first sentence in that book of his)

and yes, "into the bus" would have been a good title.

chumpchange
2011-12-08, 15:31
revival!

just finished the book.

the favorite part for me was the author's own 'devil's thumb' story.

the rest was sort of depressing.

SunnyWalker
2011-12-13, 00:41
Yep, I thought it was just a depressing book. The entire thing, from page 1 and the movie also-depressing. It almost seemed he and his story were exploited.

JAK
2011-12-14, 20:10
The abandoned school bus proved to be a fatal attraction I think. That's the Catch22. Modern society is nuts, but if you leave it you will more than likely go nuts, and if you manage to take some people with you to stay sane, you might end up serving them all purple coolaid.

chumpchange
2011-12-14, 21:43
does the movie reveal if he crashed the nearby cabins or does it even mention them?

JAK
2011-12-14, 22:37
I don't remember the cabins in the movie.

SGT Rock
2011-12-14, 22:38
I haven't seen the movie or the book. My life doesn't feel like it has missed anything.

chumpchange
2011-12-14, 23:01
c'mon rock, the book only weighs 0.78 oz.

SGT Rock
2011-12-14, 23:06
I did see Grizzly Man. But by the end I was rootin' for the bear to hurry up and eat the fucker.

chumpchange
2011-12-14, 23:15
that bear prolly got sugar diabetes from eating him.

gummy bear (http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=GCi4QgPoHZE)

SGT Rock
2011-12-14, 23:19
That guy was so stupid he gave dumb-asses a bad name.

Law Dawg (ret)
2011-12-14, 23:25
I did see Grizzly Man. But by the end I was rootin' for the bear to hurry up and eat the fucker.

Oh my, think I may have sprained something laughing at that. :hahaha: I read the Into The Wild book and felt like slapping him far too many times. Just another spoiled flatlander who killed himself outdoors by being recklessly stupid. Causing yet more work load and danger for S&R teams. Maybe we should dig him up and slap him anyway.

There's a reason they call it dope. My opinion of his life fuel...:bebored:

JAK
2011-12-15, 00:28
I`m thinking about having a book written about my recent trip up to the arctic by balloon to live with the polar bear`s on melting ice caps. Sort of the best of Survivorman all rolled into one episode. Couldn`t get the chick to go with me though. Dang. They already have the movie out...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QUojf73CfU

writing this from a Polar Bear`s large intestine, somewhere in the arctic ocean, y`all.

Crikey
2011-12-15, 10:19
I did see Grizzly Man. But by the end I was rootin' for the bear to hurry up and eat the fucker.

A fool and his life are soon parted.