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kayak karl
2008-07-01, 14:31
With the holiday coming up i thought this info might be nice to know:


Have you ever wondered what happened
to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.
Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.
What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
Eleven were merchants,
nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
men of means, well educated.
But they signed the Declaration of Independence
knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader,
saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy.
He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding.
His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,Walton,
Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson Jr, noted that the BritishGeneral Cornwallis
had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters.
He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire.
The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
Their 13 children fled for their lives.
His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste.
For more than a year he lived in forests and caves,
returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.
A few weeks later he died from exhaustion and a broken heart.
Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution.
These were not wild-eyed, rabble-rousing ruffians.
They were soft-spoken men of means and education.
They had security, but they valued liberty more.
Standing tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged:
"For the support of this declaration, with firm reliance
on the protection of the divine providence,
we mutually pledge to each other,
our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor."

They gave you and me a free and independent America.
The history books never told you a lot about what happened in the Revolutionary War.
We didn't fight just the British.
We were British subjects at that time and we fought our own government!
Some of us take these liberties so much for granted, but we shouldn't.
So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday
and silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.
Remember: freedom is never free!
It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a sin,
and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games.

enviro
2008-07-01, 14:38
With the holiday coming up i thought this info might be nice to know:


Have you ever wondered what happened
to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.
Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.
What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
Eleven were merchants,
nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
men of means, well educated.
But they signed the Declaration of Independence
knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader,
saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy.
He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding.
His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,Walton,
Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson Jr, noted that the BritishGeneral Cornwallis
had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters.
He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire.
The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
Their 13 children fled for their lives.
His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste.
For more than a year he lived in forests and caves,
returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.
A few weeks later he died from exhaustion and a broken heart.
Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution.
These were not wild-eyed, rabble-rousing ruffians.
They were soft-spoken men of means and education.
They had security, but they valued liberty more.
Standing tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged:
"For the support of this declaration, with firm reliance
on the protection of the divine providence,
we mutually pledge to each other,
our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor."

They gave you and me a free and independent America.
The history books never told you a lot about what happened in the Revolutionary War.
We didn't fight just the British.
We were British subjects at that time and we fought our own government!
Some of us take these liberties so much for granted, but we shouldn't.
So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday
and silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.
Remember: freedom is never free!
It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a sin,
and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games.



Thanks for sharing that Karl.

blueridgetreks
2008-07-01, 22:10
Karl - Thanks for the reminder. Just finished the John Adams mini-series that had been on HBO and these men truly did put their lives on the line. I am a Naturalized U.S. citizen (born in Scotland) and as such had to take an Oath of Allegiance in 1984 not unlike the oath of our Founding Fathers. It is a shame that Natural born U.S. citizens don't take a similar Oath unless they are being sworn into the military. Here is the Oath I took back in 1984 in Norfolk VA:

"I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God."

Wise Old Owl
2008-07-01, 22:13
ooowch thanks K Karl oh my I had no idea.

kayak karl
2008-07-02, 19:52
ooowch thanks K Karl oh my I had no idea.
neither did i. i now know why "In God we Trust" is on our money. these men had to have great faith.

don't hesitate to copy text and e-mail. thats how i got it.

JAK
2008-07-02, 23:00
Below is from wikipedia. It's a sort of critique of the Declaration of Independance, which I think is really quite lame. It make some points, but overall it is absurd to claim that a nation needs to achieve some higher standard BEFORE declaring independance. What I think makes the Declaration of Independance great, was that it was a statement of what these men, and all men, were aspiring to be, not what they were claiming to be. Some would argue that documents such as the Declaration of Independance and U.S. Constitution are flawed, because of the flaws that existed in society at the time they were written. I don't think that is so. They are only flawed if we ourselves are flawed. If we can't draw inspiration and guidance from these men, to continue to aspire to progress our societies forward as they did, that is our flaw, not theirs.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Declaration_of_Independence
The first edition of the Declaration of Independence was reprinted at London in the August 1776 issue of The Gentleman's Magazine. The Gentleman's Magazine had been following American issues for many years, and its editors (Edward Cave and, subsequently, David Henry) were close to Benjamin Franklin in particular, publishing several of his writings on electricity. The Declaration itself was followed in the September issue by "Thoughts on the late Declaration of the American Congress", signed only "An Englishman". The author identified certain absurdities (as he saw them) contained in the now famous words of the preamble. Most notably, he pointed out the document's inconsistency with the fact that slavery and government was still being practiced in America (emphasized in the following excerpt):

We hold (they say) these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created equal. In what are they created equal? Is it in size, understanding, figure, moral or civil accomplishments, or situation of life? Every plough-man knows that they are not created equal in any of these....That every man hath an unalienable right to liberty; and here the words, as it happens, are not nonsense, but they are not true: slaves there are in America, and where there are slaves, there liberty is alienated. If the Creator hath endowed man with an unalienable right to liberty, no reason in the world will justify the abridgement of that liberty, and a man hath a right to do everything that he thinks proper without controul or restraint; and upon the same principle, there can be no such things as servants, subjects, or government of any kind whatsoever. In a word, every law that hath been in the world since the formation of Adam, gives the lie to this self-evident truth, (as they are pleased to term it) ; because every law, divine or human, that is or hath been in the world, is an abridgement of man's liberty. (The Gentleman's Magazine, vol. 46, pp. 403–404)

p.s. It's telling that whoever this Englishman was, he didn't even have the balls to sign his name. I guess cheap rhetoric is nothing new.

CaSteve
2008-07-03, 03:08
Below is from wikipedia. It's a sort of critique of the Declaration of Independance, which I think is really quite lame. It make some points, but overall it is absurd to claim that a nation needs to achieve some higher standard BEFORE declaring independance.

...

p.s. It's telling that whoever this Englishman was, he didn't even have the balls to sign his name. I guess cheap rhetoric is nothing new.

Stereotypical pompous British BS. They didn't get it at the time. That's why we had to fight the Revolution.

We have some current US politicians that don't get it either.

JAK
2008-07-03, 10:18
Yeah. Thank goodness we don't have any people like that here in Canada. :rolleyes:

jimtanker
2008-07-03, 17:49
So whats everyone doing for the 4th?

I just got done making a few pepsi can stoves to try out.

Have my new sexy Nicaraguan girlfriend coming over this weekend. And she loves the woods and backpacking!!!!

Amigi
2008-07-03, 18:26
Liberty is NOT synonomous with freedom, at all. Just as republicanism ( small R ) has nothing to do with democracry ( small D ).

GGS
2008-07-04, 04:22
So whats everyone doing for the 4th?

Well I was about an hour into my drive towards an extended weekend of camping and backpacking with the pups when my car died.

So now I'm back home. Thank goodness for AAA+ roadside assistance.

My best guess at this point - and my greatest hope - is I broke a timing belt. If that ain't it then I am seriously screwed because the whole engine is turning over like it has no compression.

JAK
2008-07-04, 09:33
Canada Day was on a tuesday this year, and the fireworks was cancelled because of fog. We found a nice spot to pull into where there was some natural gas equipment, overlooking the Harbour and the Harbour Bridge, and still be able to make a quick getway when it was done. It was still fun camping out in the back of the van with the family waiting for the fireworks and watching the people and cars and stuff. There was some city worker in a street sweeping truck figured it would be a good night to do the Saint John Harbour Bridge. Clever guy. Little noisy for the rest of us, and I thought maybe the dust might make the fog worse. My 8 year old daughter said, "maybe he has his kid with him, that would make it all right." Very proud moment for me. As it turned out, watching the truck was the best entertainment of the night. It was a great night, even without the fireworks.

Anyhow, I'm still up for celebrating tonight it being on a Friday and all. Maybe not a drive down to Calais Maine, but maybe a hotdog and marshmallow roast for the kids with the neighbours. Happy 4th. How old are you guys now anyway? 232? Still young.

:birthday:

Tin Man
2008-07-04, 10:55
Just dropping in to pay my respects and wish everyone a Happy 4th of July!

Enjoy!

---

This just came into my email and thought I would share it...

Bumper sticker of the year:
'If you can read this, thank a teacher - and, since it's in English, thank a soldier'

---

Thanks to all who have served or who are currently serving. Pray for those who have lost a loved one or are currently in harms way.

Wise Old Owl
2008-07-04, 12:08
ahhh just another quiet day in front of the laptop... then bang goes the fireworks...

JAK
2008-07-04, 16:16
Fireworks are on for tonight. I'll be thinking of you guys.

dixicritter
2008-07-04, 16:44
I just got off work... I plan on spending the rest of the day relaxing!!!!

peter_pan
2008-07-04, 18:17
To those who have paid some price of sacrifice for freedoms sake....thank you.....

For everyone else have a nice day and thank a VET.

Pan

JAK
2008-07-04, 18:37
When the Mountain Icon turns icy blue
the easy drink taste of Coors Light
is as ice cold as we meant it to be.

Cheers.

Mutinousdoug
2008-07-04, 22:01
When the Mountain Icon turns icy blue
the easy drink taste of Coors Light
is as ice cold as we meant it to be.

Cheers.

JAK;

Step away from the beercan. The beercan is not actually talking to you. (It's those Molson guys!)

JAK
2008-07-05, 09:57
Thanks for that, I was looking for some deep inner meaning.

sheepdog
2011-07-04, 15:13
http://youtu.be/Q65KZIqay4E
Q65KZIqay4E

Footslogger
2011-07-04, 15:23
I caught a nice small mouth bass in the lake at our campground. Too hot/humid for fishin so the dog and meandered back up to the camper where "Old Glory" was flappin in the breeze off the front of our little rv. Sure proud and glad to be an American ...

'Slogger

SGT Rock
2011-07-04, 15:48
Happy fourth y'all. Heading out to the Smokies to watch the natural fireworks.

Tin Man
2011-07-04, 17:26
Happy fourth y'all. Heading out to the Smokies to watch the natural fireworks.

outstanding!

Crikey
2011-07-04, 21:16
We (me and the wife) are spending the 4th packing to go to Africa Thursday.

The plan is to be on top of Kilimanjaro on the 15th.

Happy 4th to everybody, safe hiking. If you're interested I'll post some pics.

Nearly Normal
2011-07-04, 21:56
Parris Island should be getting ready to have the fireworks show...Marine Corps Band will be warmed up with a few tunes by then to get the crowd fired up.
Fireworks, patriotic songs...makes you feel great.
Great fireworks event.

Rockhound
2011-07-04, 23:26
wikipedia. Don't really get it. As the world continues to get stupider we continually change our history to reflect that? Is that wikipedia. A recent change of note. Paul Revere was not a blacksmith who warned the minutemen that the British were coming. He was a courier who was warning the British about the minutemen. What I do not understand is the whole "one if by land and two if by sea" thing. If Paul Revere was warning the British, wouldn't the British already know how they were arriving?

Nearly Normal
2011-07-04, 23:45
well.....there's plenty out there in print. Some you take as true, some you take a drink over and think about it, then there's the sea stories.
Don't mean nothing.......then thse pesky news shows that never end.....turn that shit off.

We ain';t getting dumber, we's just ain't got to think/

Weary
2011-07-04, 23:45
My wife and I just got baCK from the fireworks set off from a barge in the middle of the Kennebec River in the city six miles north of our home. The pick 'em yourself strawberry season is in full swing. I spent the morning making nine pints of strawberry jam, and freezing another 8 or 10 quarts. My wife was working selling strawberry shortcakes as a volunteer for a club she is associated with. This is about the 50th year of the shortcake sale. It's part of the city's annual Heritage Days.

Thanks for the reminder about the signers of the DEclaration of Independence. We need to be reminded about such matters from time to time. A poll last week found that 26 percent of Americans don't know which country we gained independence from.

I'm not surprised. When my wife worked as a census taker last year, she repeatedly faced folks who insisted taking a census is unconstitutional.

Skidsteer
2011-07-05, 07:23
wikipedia. Don't really get it. As the world continues to get stupider we continually change our history to reflect that? Is that wikipedia. A recent change of note. Paul Revere was not a blacksmith who warned the minutemen that the British were coming. He was a courier who was warning the British about the minutemen. What I do not understand is the whole "one if by land and two if by sea" thing. If Paul Revere was warning the British, wouldn't the British already know how they were arriving?

Paul Revere was a silversmith, not a blacksmith.

Superman
2011-07-05, 07:32
wikipedia. Don't really get it. As the world continues to get stupider we continually change our history to reflect that? Is that wikipedia. A recent change of note. Paul Revere was not a blacksmith who warned the minutemen that the British were coming. He was a courier who was warning the British about the minutemen. What I do not understand is the whole "one if by land and two if by sea" thing. If Paul Revere was warning the British, wouldn't the British already know how they were arriving?

History is being re-written soooo fast it's hard for them to keep track of it. "1984" was nothing compared to 2011. It's rude of you to mention it though.:beer:

woodsy
2011-07-05, 08:04
History is being re-written soooo fast it's hard for them to keep track of it.

I know, now they are saying that christopher columbus wasn't the 1st to discover our beloved america. :captain:

Wonder
2011-07-05, 09:05
I guess I did my 4th celebrating on the 2nd. Good time too! I spend my 4th selling my wares on Main Street in Brevard, NC......and my evening sitting at Gung Ho and Roots dining room table watching X-files and making a wedding bracelet order that is due today. I always end up with the jobs where I work on Holidays!

Weary
2011-07-05, 10:35
I know, now they are saying that christopher columbus wasn't the 1st to discover our beloved america. :captain:
Some of us have long believed that it was Asians crossing on the ice into what it is now Alaska and working their way south. Of course, those Norwegian types rowed west 400 years before Columbus was born. They even left their signatures on a rock found on one of our land trust preserves, and left foundations of houses not too far from where Jak lives.

I never did trust those Portugese and Spansih sailors anyway. What were true Americans thinking when they let them in?

Ray
2011-07-05, 10:42
Paul Revere was a silversmith, not a blacksmith.So that's why he charged so much for shoeing horses.

Weary
2011-07-05, 10:55
wikipedia. ....A recent change of note. Paul Revere was not a blacksmith who warned the minutemen that the British were coming. He was a courier who was warning the British about the minutemen. What I do not understand is the whole "one if by land and two if by sea" thing. If Paul Revere was warning the British, wouldn't the British already know how they were arriving?
Sorry, that's just a rumor being spread by someone from Alaska. I'm trying to forget her name. Sarah something or other. BTW Paul was not a blacksmith, but a silversmith. I knew him well back then. Or at least I read a poem about him once. I think the poem was written by a Bowdoin College professor. If so the author must have lived not far from the Kennebec River -- you know that river that hikers love to talk about wading across, after taking the canoe ferry.

Rockhound
2011-07-05, 12:27
Paul Revere was a silversmith, not a blacksmith.

Give it time. Wikipedia will change that.

Ray
2011-07-05, 12:30
... I knew him well back then.....Yeah but that's when Paul was just a little kid.

Weary
2011-07-05, 12:32
So that's why he charged so much for shoeing horses.
In his old age Paul made church bells. One of them hangs in the city hall of the nearest town. It's cracked so it doesn't get used much.

Tin Man
2011-07-05, 14:19
I never did trust those Portugese and Spansih sailors anyway. What were true Americans thinking when they let them in?

Crazy Horse: "hmm, white man have big gun, we have shitty arrows. what we do?"

Sitting Bull: "run to mtns and wait for general custer. then we show 'em"

SGT Rock
2011-07-05, 14:47
Great night out on a bald in the Smokies. I got to see a lot of the fireworks in Bryson City and Cherokee without having to be too close to it.

SGT Rock
2011-07-05, 15:54
Nice pictures. Of course they don't do it justice

SGT Rock
2011-07-05, 16:02
More pictures

SGT Rock
2011-07-05, 16:02
Last one

Bearpaw
2011-07-05, 20:24
Andrews Bald is the first bald I ever hiked, back in 1986 with my scout troop. It was a natural spot to visit, with it only being a couple of miles from the Clingman's Dome parking lot.

General
2011-07-05, 23:14
nice pics. looks like you had some good weather.

i got turbo drunk for four days. 2 days at the lake, and 2 days on the river. today, not so pleasant.

john pickett
2011-07-06, 14:36
Rock, don't suppose you have any pictures of the fireworks?
Here in San Antonio we're under a fireworks ban due to the drought. And my wife and I are usually in bed around 9. (=^(

SGT Rock
2011-07-06, 16:11
Nope, too far away for anything to have come out well.

ki0eh
2011-07-07, 22:44
Somebody in Emory was shooting off more and better fireworks on the 2nd than I remember seeing at some official fireworks shows where I grew up. We had great seats from the roof of the dorm at the ATC biennial meeting.

Hikerhead
2011-07-07, 23:28
Somebody in Emory was shooting off more and better fireworks on the 2nd than I remember seeing at some official fireworks shows where I grew up. We had great seats from the roof of the dorm at the ATC biennial meeting.

Shucks, I forgot all about that and it was just down the road from me.

ki0eh
2011-07-08, 08:50
Shucks, I forgot all about that and it was just down the road from me.

You're awful young for that crowd...