PDA

View Full Version : HomeMade backpacking Tipi



MRH
2008-07-23, 14:47
I'm new to this site, so I hope I get the pic's in... I've been wanting to make my own tipi for a few years, so while its been hot, I'm almost done with it. I still need to sew in some fiberglass cloth for a wood burning stove. This is my 1st sewing project... Its made out of 1.1 oz SilNylon blue/gray. The tipi wt 2lbs 4oz, center pole is 14oz and 8 alum. stakes are 5oz, totals 3lbs 7oz. The tipi is 7'4" tall and has a 12' octagon base. The screen netting clips in and is 10oz if needed. I thought I would take the zipper to the top cap so if needed I could unzip from top to release any heat or condensation I hope. here are a few pic's...

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/tipi/100_1088.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/tipi/100_1089.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/tipi/100_1090.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/tipi/100_1100.jpg
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/tipi/100_1115.jpg

This is a TarpTent I cut out but had a friend sew it for me a few years ago.

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm38/skindive_11/tipi/100_1109.jpg

Bearpaw
2008-07-23, 14:58
That's a fantastic MYOG project. It looks great. How much did the whole thing cost?

MRH
2008-07-23, 15:13
I bought the fabric from Outdoors Wildness Fabrics. I bought 2nd's for 3.83 yd. then I went to Sears and bought a Kenmore $99. sewing machine on sale. so I have $90. in Fabric with extras and $100. in sewing maching... thanks for comment.

Frolicking Dino
2008-07-23, 16:04
Very nice. I may have to make one of these for the Dinos.

CaSteve
2008-07-23, 22:02
Impressive work. I think you've inspired me to try sewing.

SGT Rock
2008-07-23, 22:06
It would be cool seems like Matthewski was using something similar on the AT this year.

Frolicking Dino
2008-07-23, 22:27
Matty was using a MegaMid (http://www.bdel.com/gear/mega_light.php) which is similar. However, the octagonal design of MRH's model plus the long zipper make the design much better IMO. My hat is off to you, MRH for this design.

MRH
2008-07-24, 11:06
Thanks for the great comments. I plan to try it out next weekend. I had bought enough fabric to build two, just incase I messed the 1st one up... I was going to make a 10" Eyebrow cover over the top zipper so I could vent the tipi while raining. still thinking on that one...
I have 16 stake loops sewn in bottom, but I use 8 stakes on the primary seams. if its a bad storm I can use sticks for the other 8 stake loops and I also sewn in small loops about 2' from bottom to attach string for extra support.

GGS
2008-07-24, 13:49
Awesome! You beat me to the punch, I too want to make a backpacking tipi.

I plan on adding a stove jack to mine for use with one of those Kifaru type stoves for winter camping and pulking.

What did you use for a center pole? Does it come apart in sections?

MRH
2008-07-24, 14:26
I saved all my past tents aluminum poles. so I cut 4 of them 20" long, they slide into one another, than at the bottom, I have a smaller dia pole that slides in, to adjust pole ht. I bought my fiberglass cloth for the stove jack from: http://www.beckelcanvas.com/products_view.php?products_id=27
$30.00 for a 3'x5' section or they custom make u one.
I've been looking at the Kifaru stoves,,, but I like titaniumgoat stove also... still undecided.

JAK
2008-07-25, 10:31
Way cool. I really like the bug screen. I've been thinking of making a rain cape that doubles as a bivy. Now I'm thinking of being able to pitch is as a teepee, not for sleeping under but maybe for squatting under, for eating or resting. Might dry out better than just wearing it as a cape. I am not sure if it is possible to have something like that large enough to sit under but still small enough to wear as a cape. I'll need to think some more on this just to get it half baked.

Frolicking Dino
2008-07-25, 11:55
Way cool. I really like the bug screen. I've been thinking of making a rain cape that doubles as a bivy. Now I'm thinking of being able to pitch is as a teepee, not for sleeping under but maybe for squatting under, for eating or resting. Might dry out better than just wearing it as a cape. I am not sure if it is possible to have something like that large enough to sit under but still small enough to wear as a cape. I'll need to think some more on this just to get it half baked.I made something like this a few years ago - it had snaps that folded in the extra material when it was being used as poncho / cape. It worked pretty well, but got torn in a fall and I never made another one.

You can also deploy this as a sleeping shelter by staking it in a rectangular shape an adding a loop behind the hood - just tie a rope from tree to tree and pass the rope thru the loop to hold up the structure - this eliminates the need for a center pole and makes the structure suitable for sleeping.

jmayo33021
2008-07-25, 12:39
That is awesome!!! Did you design it yourself or did you use a pattern?

MRH
2008-07-25, 14:37
I designed this one myself. Kifaru has something similar, their tipi's are oval with 2 doors and wider at base with a little more wt. They have a great design. I'm 6'1, so I wanted a backpacking tipi I could stand up in and while its raining, be comfortable in with the least wt possible. My tipi is octagon shape with one door that zips to the top and has a smaller base to save wt. It can sleep 4 maybe 5 if needed, but most of the time I’ll be alone. It takes less than 5 minutes to set up.

SGT Rock
2008-07-25, 15:35
You developed a wood stove for it yet ;)

MRH
2008-07-25, 16:20
Not yet,,, I'm really looking at the titaniumgoat stove because of the wt and heat transfer,,, but I really would like to make one... still researching that one.
SGT Rock, I see you backpacked the Eagle Rock Loop. I have a cabin about 20 miles from there,,, I go there all the time... I really want to do the AT. just got to find the time...

jmayo33021
2008-07-26, 13:01
I designed this one myself. Kifaru has something similar, their tipi's are oval with 2 doors and wider at base with a little more wt. They have a great design. I'm 6'1, so I wanted a backpacking tipi I could stand up in and while its raining, be comfortable in with the least wt possible. My tipi is octagon shape with one door that zips to the top and has a smaller base to save wt. It can sleep 4 maybe 5 if needed, but most of the time Iíll be alone. It takes less than 5 minutes to set up.

What were the dimensions of the panels before you sewed them together?

JAK
2008-07-26, 14:31
Not yet,,, I'm really looking at the titaniumgoat stove because of the wt and heat transfer,,, but I really would like to make one... still researching that one.
SGT Rock, I see you backpacked the Eagle Rock Loop. I have a cabin about 20 miles from there,,, I go there all the time... I really want to do the AT. just got to find the time...I think for a smaller teepee or pyramid tent you need to go even smaller than the ultralight wood stoves, so building your own is a good option. Most of the weight is in the stovepipe once you go small enough. I saw a design, in a library book I think, for a small wood stove actually made of stovepipe. Sort of a like a cleanout trap you would see in plumbing, but all put together with tin snippers of course. With a smaller stove you can go to smaller diameter stove pipe. I've thought of using a 1.5" diameter titanium tube as a hiking stick / tentpole / stove pipe. 'just another idea less than half baked idea. I think once your far enough out of the stove you could switch to aluminum tubing, which would be cheaper, but the stove itself would need to be something else. Insulating the stove pipe from the tent isn't as hard as it seems, and if its small enough keeping the whole think from burning wouldn't be too hard either, but its always a good idea to wear wool underwear when playing with fire in a tent.

MRH
2008-07-26, 18:33
JMAY033021
The pattern dimension I made equals 4’7” at bottom, length is 9’1/2”. The results would be 9’ long x 4.5’ at bottom. I recommend you make one out of paper 1st. Use 1” = 1’, so the results would be on paper 4.5”wide at bottom and 9” long. Tape all eight panels together.

JAK
The only reason for a wood burning stove is to heat the tipi in very cold weather. I can also cook on it since I’m taking it… I think I would go with a larger stove just because the burn time would be longer. A small stove may get from 30min to 1 hr burn time. A larger stove may get 2 or 3 times that… maybe… I have an outfitters tent with a 4-dog-stove model and I only have to refill once in middle of night… The small titanium goat stove has a 3” opening and wt is 2lbs, 8.5oz. The large has a 3.5” opening and wt is 3lbs, 7oz, so for 1lb I can put more wood in it and close the damper for a very slow burn… but their stoves are very pricey. I would like to make one out of titanium, still researching…

JAK
2008-07-27, 10:23
The longer burn time is a good idea in theory, but in practice I think you might get driven out of the tent for an hour, then back in just fine for a couple, and still wake up in the morning cold. Maybe it makes sense to go with a somewhat bigger tent to go with the stove. Not sure. Hot rocks work but they can be hard to come by in winter. Hot water bottles work also, but more that 2 starts to get impractical unless you are carrying food and stuff in them when packed. I wonder also if you could mind the stove in such a way to make charcoal and then use charcoal for a long burn, with proper ventilation of course. Kifaru has good information on good tent/stove combinations. They all seem to involve firing up the stove in the morning though. Turk made himself a pretty nice setup. Being able to dry clothes inside is a nice option. I think you want to be able to open it up at the top when you do that. Your setup with the screen looks like it would work very well, and when opened up like that would work well with one of those stoves I think. Maybe close that in at night after the drying is done. Mid winter some of those small stoves would be worth their weight in food even without a tent though. Pretty slick.

Turks setup:
http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?t=2496&highlight=turk+woodstove

rbd
2008-07-27, 10:44
There's a variation of the tipi design that may interest you. I've only seen it once being used by a Skolti (sp) Lapp in northern Finland. He was using an open tipi (basically a multi-sided lean-to) with additional fabric sewn from the sides of the tipi about 1/3 to 1/2 of the way to the top. This fabric created a tent inside the tipi lean-to that it could be pushed back when not being used. His was supported with poles on the sides and protected the open fire he used for cooking. The poles on the windward side were longer in order for the tipi to protect the fire. It was very simple and quite functional. Provided a bug-free area when sleeping.

JAK
2008-07-27, 11:02
That sounds interesting. I think I get your description.

Kind of reminds me in a way of Alexander Graham Bell's Tetrahedral Shelter. It was made of wood, but it as basically a three sided pyramid open on one, but with another side on the inside at the back which made a space for storing stuff and sitting up against. More sides might be better, but similar idea of teepee within a teepee. I think for solo operations you need to stretch out one or two corners much as Kifaru does with the paratarp.

Where I am there are lots of trees, so I would like something that could take advantage of the trees without burning them down or having the snow drip or fall down on me. Some make great shelters all by themselves as this one last winter. I think I might have burnt the roots a little so I want to make a platform of some kind.

My bivouac next morning from angle showing 'wigwam'.
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p243/JAK_45/WinterCamping/LongIsland2008_7.jpg

Jarhead
2008-07-27, 15:12
Hey that is very nice. I really like that tarp tent!

MRH
2008-07-28, 01:02
JAK
I’ve seen a different Thread Turk had on the stove and he did a great write up on it. What data I would like to see and what I want to do is: Fire the stove up, cook on it, and Yes,,, your right, it will get hot, so I’ll just have to open the panels or unzip from the top and open alittle. After there are a bed of hot ambers, load the stove up with large dia wood and close the stove down to where it puts out just a little heat, maybe even be able to do a quick touch on the stove. Make the tipi 15 to 20 deg warmer, than in the morning fire it back up. It would be nice to have when it’s 15 deg and the wind is gusting 20+mph. I like the pic of your tree house…

RBD
I’m wondering how much his tipi weighed with the extra fabric inside and did he bring the poles or use what he could find…

JarHead
Thanks, the tarptent I used for several years and did great. Wt is 14oz . 10’long, 8x11 wide with a 3.25” catenary curve on top. I thought about making a clip in front and back panels for it during very cold weather, but I made a tipi instead…

Greentick
2008-07-28, 02:44
That tipi is outstanding. Great work.

rbd
2008-07-28, 09:20
MRH - It must have weighed a ton. It was made of canvas and well used. This was in the mid-60's, so I don't recall very well. He could have brought in the poles or cut them on location. He was panning a creek for gold with water shussess made from lumber. Must have brought in his mining equipment. Don't know how - no roads there - probably packed in with a work reindeer that someone else took home. I expect that he intended to be there for the summer - work the whole creek - takes a while to collect much gold dust up there.
The extra material on the inside of the fabric created something like a "pup tent" inside the tipi. That part may have just been made of a cotton sheet, which will also create a warm sleeping area. The fire was only for cooking. Main food was dried reindeer.
In your situation, you may want a small sleeping area made of netting for bug protection in the summer. Anyhow, his setup was the best I've ever seen - simple, functional and eligant. Just thought you may be interested....

Frolicking Dino
2008-07-28, 10:09
I've used the breathable pup tent inside a non-breathable larger structure in the winter -- it is very effective for maintaining warmth.

::: Dino is in awe at display of knowledge of stoves inside tents on this forum :::

Turk
2008-07-30, 00:28
Wow. Been meaning to post in this thread since I saw it.
Replied to your questions best I could.

Once again. Amazing project :adore::adore::adore:

You have hit on so many design issues that are commonly discussed
on other forums in terms of tipi flaws and performance issues.

I absolutely have to agree with going with a large wood stove with
a controlled choke on both combustion air and exhaust. For kicks I looked
at the kifaru tipi charts based on using say a Kifaru medium or ti-goat large
stove... with the height and square footage of your octagonal base, I
wouldn't be surprised if you managed an indoor temperature increase of > 120 deg F
on full burner. I can't wait to see some testing data.

If I was a ground dweller .... I would totally want your tipi design.
I think it is an awesome compromise of several design elements, and I
think the finished product looks fantastic and comes in at lavish dimensions
for its weight. Well done!!!!!!!!!!!

Finally will have someone else to discuss heated shelters and improvements with.
Not that there isn't info and people out there.. but it makes all the difference when its someone
with lightweight backpacking goals driving the innovation. Been waiting all year for GGS to get
his :) Can also get some threads going on pulking and snowshoe hikes.


p.s. - little inspiration to spur on your excellent DIY skills


http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/1/3/7/dsc00581.jpg
http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/1/3/7/dsc00577.jpg
http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/1/3/7/dsc00543.jpg

MRH
2008-07-30, 01:13
Turk, thanks for the comments. I think ur video is awesome... I'm going to call Titaniumgoat and talk to them about their air intake holes below the door. I would like to have one made for me and decreased the holes from 9 to 3, or maybe even have no holes at all and use the door to contol the air input. The stove may preform a longer burn with lower btu's... just my opinion.

Tipi Walter
2008-07-30, 22:39
Ya gotta love the old tipi design, it's been around for 50,000 years and it still calls out to people. You did an amazing job considering each panel looks high and tight. I really like the extra stake out points on the perimeter.

In the old days people threw up some poles in a tripod, threw some animals skins over it, left a hole in the top for a fire, and put a ring of rocks around the outside to hold the skins down in the wind. Modern humans have been finding these mysterious circles of rocks for centuries, last vestiges of the ancient tipi shelters.

I spent a winter in a Chouinard Pyramid(like the Megamid)and have some user bewares: The center pole always seems to interfere with sleeping but it's not too much of a problem. The worst problem I had was using it on a high open bald in the winter with strong 60 mph winds and wind-blown snow. I spent many nights awake and holding down the leading edge from pulling up from the ground and blowing the whole thing away. Something to consider in harsh conditions. Plus, wind-blown snow will cover everything inside unless it is set up in a deep snow and using it for what Yvon Chouinard intended it to be used: As a snow shelter partially buried in snow, with all the outside perimeter edges buried in snow.

incognito
2008-08-01, 00:16
Nice shelter, I like the ability to stand up in it. I wanted to make a full sized 16' dia. one but I'll have to settle for something small. Good winter project.

Thanks for the inspiration!!!!